PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-731 PUBLISHED August 05, 2014
Markets for Sensors for the Smart Grid: 2014-2021
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY
    NanoMarkets has been providing coverage of the market for smart grid sensors for almost five years now and has acquired an insider’s knowledge of both the dynamics of this market and how sensors are currently being deployed in the smart grid. In this new report, we reexamine the market for grid sensors in what we believe are fundamentally new conditions. 
     
    First, we consider how the shift to the Internet-of-Things (IoT) will impact the smart grid market.  In past, grid sensors were either standalone devices or deployed in small networks that were not connected to each other.  In the near-term future we expect to see these sensors start to talk to other devices, not just in the grid, but also in lighting and HVAC systems as well as in a new generation of building automation systems.  The leap in functionality that the next generation of grid sensors will provide will both help to grow the market and lead to new requirements for such sensors
     
    This report includes an analysis of how various players up and down the smart grid supply chain – firms such as electrical equipment manufacturers, electrical companies and the sensor makers themselves -- will be able to make money out of smart grid sensor business.  In addition, as with previous studies we have included a forecast of the grid sensor market with breakouts by applications, types of sensor, etc.  We also identify the key firms in this market and analyze their strategies.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 How Sensing and Monitoring Alleviates 21st Century Grid Management Challenges
    E.1.1 How the Internet of Things is Driving the Market for Sensors in the Smart Grid
    E.2 Opportunity Analysis
    E.2.1 Sensor Manufacturers
    E.2.2 Electrical Equipment and Meter Companies
    E.2.2 Power and Telephone Companies
    E.3 Key Players in the Grid Sensor Market to Watch
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts                     
                                       
    Chapter One Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of the Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two:  Applications for Sensors in the Smart Grid
    2.1 Current and Future Roles for Sensors in SCADA Networks
    2.2 Sensors in the Advanced Metering Infrastructure
    2.2.1 Impact of the IoT
    2.3 Sensors Requirements for Grid Management
    2.3.1 Outage Management System  
    2.3.2 Peak Load Management          
    2.3.3 Demand Response       
    2.3.4 Power Quality Management
    2.3.5 Phasor Measurement Units      
    2.3.6 Other Grid Management Applications
    2.4 Sensors in Energy Storage          
    2.4.1 Electric Vehicles and Charging Infrastructure:  Sensor Requirements
    2.4.2 Energy Storage, Sensors and Capacity Firming          
    2.5 Generation-Related Applications for Grid Sensors                     
    2.5.1 Sensor Requirements for Renewable Energy Integration
    2.5.2 Sensors and Supply Response from Generation side
    2.5.3 Other Facilities Automation Applications for Sensor Management
    2.6 Sensor Requirements for Microgrids
    2.7 Key Points from this Chapter
               
    Chapter 3: Products and Technology Opportunities for Sensors in Realizing the Smart Grid         
    3.1 Sensors for Grid Maintenance:  Voltage, Current, Capacitance, Inductance and Phase Measurement           
    3.2 Time Synchronization Sensors    
    3.3 Chemical/Gas Sensors in the Smart Grid
    3.3.1 Humidity and Moisture Sensors
    3.3.2 Air Quality Sensors
    3.3.3 Chemical/Gas Sensors for Safety                   
    3.4 Temperature Sensing and Monitoring in the Smart Grid
    3.5 Sensors for Energy Conservation Sensors         
    3.6 Equipment Monitoring Units (EMUs)       
    3.7 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four:  Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Grid Sensors
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology
    4.1.1 Data Sources
    4.1.3 General Economic Assumptions
    4.1.4 Forecasting Approach
    4.1.5 Alternative Scenarios
    4.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Grid Sensors
    4.2.1 Sensors in SCADA Networks by Type of Sensor
    4.2.2 Sensors in the Advanced Metering Infrastructure by Type of Sensor
    4.2.3 Sensors in Grid Management by Type of Application and Type of Sensor
    4.2.4 Sensors for Energy Storage by Type of Application and Type of Sensor
    4.2.5 Sensors for Renewable Energy Generation by Type of Sensor
    4.2.6 Other Grid-Related Sensor Applications at Generators
    4.2.7 Sensors for Microgrids
    4.3 Summary of Eight-Year Grid Sensor Forecasts by Application
    4.4 Summary of Eight-Year Grid Sensor Forecasts by Sensor Type
    4.5 Summary of Eight-Year Grid Sensor Forecast by Country/Geographic Region
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-733 PUBLISHED July 31, 2014
Materials for Next-Generation Photovoltaics – 2014-2021
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY
    The PV boom and bust has rebooted efforts to commercialize the next generation of materials platforms for solar panels.  There has recently been a resurgence of the solar panel industry but many of the surviving firms are Chinese companies making conventional crystalline silicon (c-Si) panels.  Also surviving is First Solar with its stable and ongoing production of CdTe.
     
    With the solar panel industry now back on track, however, the search is on once more for materials platforms that improve the conversion efficiency of solar panels, both now and in the future.  Some of these are close at hand – novel approaches to doping silicon panels are a good example here.  Meanwhile, the thin-film PV sector is looking for its next success after CdTe.  This could be CIGS, but there are also several other complex materials that are being developed for next generation thin-film solar and which are now beginning to receive serious commercial attention. 
     
    We are also seeing the solar industry beginning to think out of the box with a slew of entirely new nanomaterials such as quantum dots, nanowires, nanotubes and graphene.  The commercialization of these materials for solar applications lies a few years off. But eventually they will offer radical new ways to boost the performance of the absorber, photoactive and electrode layers in next-generation solar panels.
     
    In this report NanoMarkets develops a roadmap for next-generation solar materials and analyzes their revenue potential over the next eight years.  The report includes a granular eight-year forecast of quantities shipped of these materials and revenues generated.  The report also examines the commercialization strategies of the suppliers already actively involved in this space as well as the opportunities emerging for start-ups.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Key Technology Trends in Solar Panels
    E.1.1 Rethinking Cell Structures
    E.1.2 New Directions in Absorber and Photoactive Materials
    E.1.3 Materials Trends in Solar Panel Electrodes
    E.2 Opportunities for Solar Panel Makers
    E.2.1 The Start-Up Potential for Next-Generation Solar
    E.3 Opportunities for Materials Firms and the Specialty Chemical Industry
    E.4 How New Materials Could Expand the Addressable Market for Solar Panels  
    E.5 Six Firms to Watch
    E.6 Summary of Eight-Year Forecast of Next-Generation PV Materials
     
    Chapter One Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.2 Scope and Objectives for this Report
    1.3 Methodology for this Report
    1.3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two Emerging Opportunities in Silicon Photovoltaics
    2.1 New Dopants and n-Type Substrates for Crystalline Silicon PV
    2.2 Is there Hope for Thin-Film Silicon PV?
    2.3 Whatever happened to Nanosilicon for Solar?
    2.3.1 Nanocoatings for c-Si
    2.3.2 Silicon filaments for light management
    2.3.3 Nanocrystalline silicon panels
    2.4 Key Suppliers of Nanosilicon and Other New Materials for Silicon PV
    2.5 Notable Manufacturing Trends
    2.5.1 Diamond Wire for Slicing Panels
    2.5.2 Laser Processing
    2.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Novel Silicon Materials for PV
    2.6.1 Timeframe for New Silicon-based PV Materials
    2.7 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three Next-Generation Thin-Film PV
    3.1 CIGS Resurgent?
    3.2 CZTS and its Variants:  The New Thin-Film Wonder Material?
    3.3 Other New Thin-Film Materials
    3.3.1 CdMgTe
    3.3.2 Pyrite
    3.4 Improving CdTe
    3.5 Key Suppliers of Novel Thin-Film PV Materials
    3.6 Improving Manufacturing Options for Thin-Film PV
    3.7 Eight-Year Forecast of Novel Thin-Film Materials for PV
    3.8 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four OPV and DSC:  The Next Generation
    4.1 The Future of OPV
    4.1.1 OPV Materials Trends
    4.2 Perovskites:  Next-Generation DSC?
    4.3 Key Suppliers of Next-Generation OPV and DSC Materials
    4.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Materials for Next-Generation OPV and DSC
    4.5 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Five Nanomaterials for Next Generation PV
    5.1 Quantum Dot PV:  How Far in the Future?
    5.1.1 Promising Materials for QD PV
    5.1.2 Key Suppliers of Materials and Panels for QD PV
    5.2 Carbon Nanotubes in Next-Generation PV
    5.2.1 Absorber and Photoactive Layer
    5.2.2 Transparent Conductor
    5.3 Graphene
    5.3.1 Absorber and Photoactive Layer
    5.3.2 Transparent Conductor
    5.4 Silver Nanowires/Metal Meshes for Transparent Conductors in Next-Generation PV
    5.5 Possible Uses for Semiconductor Nanowires in Next-Generation PV
    5.6 Suppliers of Nanomaterials for Next-Generation PV
    5.7 Eight-Year Forecast of Nanomaterials for Next-Generation PV
    5.8 Key Points Made in this Chapter
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $2,495.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $3,495.00  
REPORT # Nano-728 PUBLISHED July 29, 2014
The Markets for Smart Lighting Drivers, Controllers and Sensor Chips – 2014
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    This report analyzes the market for LED drivers, MCUs, sensors and other chips used in smart lighting.  It is the latest in NanoMarkets ongoing series of reports on smart lighting, which covers both the lighting itself and important components and chips used in smart lighting systems.  In this report we explicitly discuss smart lighting components in the context of the emerging Internet-of-Things.  

    The report focuses on analysis for the chips that will be used in the newer kinds of smart lighting -- color tuning (mood lighting) and visible light communications (VLC) -- as well as more traditional smart lighting aimed primarily at increasing lighting efficiency.  Coverage includes innovative devices such as intelligent LED drivers with embedded sensors and the latest wireless standards for smart lighting such as Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE).

    In addition, the report also covers the needs of all the major end-user segments of the market.  We take these to be commercial and industrial, residential, government and public buildings. We have also discussed the available markets for smart lighting in transportation and outdoor lighting.  Detailed eight-year market projections of seven major smart lighting chip types in both revenue and volume terms are presented. Additional breakouts are provided by (1) the part of the lighting system in which the chips are used and (2) the technology generation of the system itself and (3) the type of building, vehicle or location in which the smart lighting systems will be used. 

    The report is designed for semiconductor industry executives that want to better understand the opportunities in smart lighting electronics.  It is also intended to provide guidance to firms in the LED and smart lighting systems sectors who need to better understand where smart-lighting electronics trends will take their businesses. 

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

    • Objective and Scope of this Report 
    • Methodology of this Report
    • Plan of this Report
    • The Four Generations of Smart Lighting
    • The Smart Lighting Opportunity for Chip Makers:  Some Definitions
    • Changes in the Market Since the 2013 NanoMarkets Smart Lighting Electronics Report
    • Impact of the “Internet-of-Things” and IPv6 on Smart Lighting Electronics
    • LED Driver Opportunities for Next-Generation Smart Lighting 
    • MCUs and the Future of Smart Lighting
    • Sensor Opportunities in Smart Lighting
    • Chips and Li-Fi
    • Impact of OLED Lighting Trends on Smart Lighting Electronics 
    • The IMOLA Project
    • Some Thoughts on Smart Ballasts
    • Ten Firms to Watch in the Smart Lighting System Electronics Space
    • Marvell:  Smart Lighting Strategies
    • NXP:  Smart Lighting Strategies
    • Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecast for Smart Lighting Chips:  By Type of Chip
    • Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecast for Smart Lighting Chips:  By Type of System
    • Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecast for Smart Lighting Chips:  By Component of Smart Lighting System

    CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

    • Background to Report
    • Chip Opportunities for a Light-Tuned World
    • Smart Lighting:  What’s Next for LED Driver Makers?
    • Smart Lighting: A New Market for MCUs
    • Sensing Opportunities:  New Materials, ZigBee, Bluetooth Low Energy, and EnOcean

    CHAPTER TWO: SMART LIGHTING EVOLUTION AND LED DRIVERS

    • LED Drivers for Smart Lighting
    • Required Capabilities and Threats for Smart Lighting LED Drivers
    • Opportunities for LED Drivers in Smart Lighting Systems
    • IC Requirements for Smart LED Drivers
    • Smart Lighting as a Pioneer Market for High-Performance LED Drivers
    • Impact of Declining Chip Prices and Costs:  the Smart Lighting Perspective 
    • Dimming and LED Drivers in Smart Lighting Markets
    • Color Tuning and the Need for Dynamic Mood and Health Lighting 
    • Color Tuning Chips:  Opportunities for the Semiconductor Industry
    • AC LEDs in Smart Lighting: A Possible Negative for the Smart Lighting Driver Market 
    • Improved Binning – an Unintended Opportunity for Smart Lighting Driver Makers
    • Voltage/Current Control and Power Load Design as Competitive Issue for Smart LED Drivers 
    • Standards for Smart Lighting LED Drivers
    • Driver Suppliers and the Opportunities for New Entrants
    • Eight-Year Forecasts of LED Drivers for Smart Lighting Electronics
    • Key Points Made in this Chapter

    CHAPTER THREE: MCUs AND THE FUTURE OF SMART LIGHTING 

    • MCUs and Other Control Chips for Smart Lighting
    • MCUs for Gateways and Controller Boxes in Smart Lighting 
    • The Rise of Central Controllers in the Smart Lighting Systems Market: Their Use of MCUs
    • Central Controllers as Early Competitive Battlefield for Smart Lighting
    • The Possible Disappearance of Gateways as a Threat to MCU Makers
    • Eight-Year Forecasts of MCUs and Other Control Chips for Smart Lighting Electronics
    • Key Points Made in this Chapter

    CHAPTER FOUR: SMART LIGHTING SENSORS

    • Sensors for Smart Lighting 
    • Creating Value-Added Sensing Devices for Smart Lighting Applications: Integration 
    • Creating Value-Added Sensing Devices for Smart Lighting Applications: New Materials
    • ZigBee and Smart Lighting 
    • Bluetooth and Smart Lighting
    • EnOcean and Smart Lighting
    • Other Protocols that may Create Opportunities for Smart Lighting Makers
    • Eight-Year Forecasts of Sensors for Smart Lighting Electronics
    • Key Points Made in this Chapter

    CHAPTER FIVE: CHIP REQUIREMENTS FOR VISIBLE LIGHT COMMUNICATIONS 

    • Evolution of Li-Fi Technology and its Markets
    • Limitations of VLC/Li-Fi
    • VLC/Li-Fi Players and Silicon Requirements
    • Eight-Year Forecasts of VLC/Li-Fi Chips  
    • Key Points Made in this Chapter
    • CHAPTER SIX: END-USER MARKET ANALYSIS AND EIGHT-YEAR FORECAST
    • Forecasting Methodology
    • Addressable Markets
    • Assumptions about Market Size and Penetration
    • Residential Smart Lighting Markets 
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Electronics for Residential Smart Lighting:  By Chip Type
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Electronics for Residential Smart Lighting:  By System Type
    • Drivers for Smart Lighting in Commercial/Industrial Buildings
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Electronics for Commercial/Industrial Smart Lighting:  By Chip Type 
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Electronics for Commercial/Industrial Smart Lighting:  By System Type
    • Drivers for Smart Lighting in Government/Public Buildings
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics in Government/Public Buildings:  By Chip Type 
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics in Government/Public Buildings:  By System Type 
    • Smart Lighting in Street Lighting and Other Outdoor Environments
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Outdoor/Street Lighting:  By Chip Type 
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Outdoor/Street Lighting:  By System Type
    • Smart Lighting in Automotive and other Transportation Environments
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Auto/Transportation Lighting:  By Chip Type 
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Auto/Transportation Lighting:  By System Type
    • Niche Applications for Smart Lighting
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Other Applications:  By Chip Type 
    • Eight-year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Other Applications:  By System Type
    • Other Market and Technology Scenarios and their Impact on Smart Lighting Electronics
    • Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Acronyms
    About the Author

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-729 PUBLISHED July 17, 2014
BIPV Markets Analysis and Forecasts 2014-2021
CATEGORIES :
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY

    In this latest report on the BIPV markets NanoMarkets is updating is quantitative and qualitative assessments and outlooks for the building integrated photovoltaic market.  We have been covering the BIPV market since 2007.  In this latest report we examine the latest important technological and market developments as well as the various region specific factors shaping the market.  While the last few years have been far from robust for the solar market there are reasons for companies and investors to view BIPV with some optimism.

    The report addresses BIPV glass, roofing and siding and assesses the prospects for the competing underlying technologies including thin-film, OPV, DSC and c-Si.  We include forecasts broken out by product, application, technology and region expressed in MW and units.  The report also provides commentaries of the various leading key suppliers and industry influencers. 

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary

    • Objectives and Scope of this Report 
    • Methodology and Information Sources
    • Plan of this Report 
    • Major changes from the previous report 
    • Developments in the non-glass BIPV market
    • Trends in the BIPV material mix
    • Upcoming trends in the non-glass BIPV Products
    • Upcoming trends in the non-glass BIPV Products – Flexible roofing
    • Trends and opportunities for BIPV glass by product type
    • Opportunities for BIPV in the end-user market
    • Companies to watch in the non-glass BIPV market
    • Companies to watch in the BIPV glass market
    • Opportunities for BIPV glass market by region/country
    • Summary of forecasting

    Chapter One: Introduction

    • Opportunities for BIPV
    • PV Market— From a demand-constrained to supply-led environment
    • BIPV market seen as promising
    • Defining BIPV 
    • Introduction of Multi-functional BIPV
    • Search for novel solutions
    • Trends in the evolution of BIPV products
    • Emerging developments in the non-glass BIPV space
    • Trends in the BIPV glass markets   
    • BIPV future scenarios

    Chapter Two: Product Segments and Emerging Trends

    • Roofing overlay and rigid roofing
    • Flexible roofing
    • Roofing
    • Monolithically integrated roofing
    • Wall-attached PV 
    • Emerging technology trends and their impact on BIPV glass
    • Key points from Chapter Two

    Chapter Three: Key Market Segments and Regional Markets 

    • End-user market segments
    • Prestige commercial, government and multi-tenant residential buildings
    • Ongoing and recently completed prestige commercial, government and multi-tenant residential buildings
    • Other commercial and government buildings
    • Residential buildings
    • Industrial buildings
    • Applications and opportunities
    • Major trends observed in the BIPV segment in 2013-2014
    • Important trends in BIPV roofing: New encapsulants
    • Enabling factors for BIPV façades despite higher costs
    • Cost vs. multi-functionality of BIPV systems
    • Why would a customer buy BIPV: A comparison between rooftops and BIPV
    • Supply chain issues in BIPV market
    • BIPV Siding
    • Markets by region and country: A discussion of market developments and subsidies
    • Key points from Chapter Three

     
    Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts of BIPV Markets

    • Forecasting assumptions
    • Forecast of non-glass BIPV roofing markets (shipment volumes, market value and materials used)
    • Forecast of non-glass BIPV wall markets (shipment volumes, market value and materials used)
    • BIPV glass (forecast by type of PV technology used, area, revenues, type of product)
    • Forecast of BIPV revenues by type of building and type of BIPV products used
    • Forecasts by Region:  By type of BIPV product
    • Forecast of materials/technology
    • Forecast of BIPV by retrofit versus new construction
    • Encapsulation materials for BIPV panels
    • Summary of forecasting
    • About the analyst
       

    Tables:

    • Summary of forecasting
    • Forecasting assumptions
    • Overall PV shipments and share of BIPV products
    • Non-glass BIPV products pricing
    • Pricing for rigid BIPV
    • Pricing for flexible BIPV
    • Percent share of roofing products in overall roofing market
    • Forecast of non-glass BIPV roofing markets
    • Material mix efficiency
    • BIPV roofing overlay market by type of PV technology used
    • BIPV roofing overlay market revenue by type of PV technology used
    • Rigid BIPV roofing market by type of PV technology used
    • Rigid BIPV roofing market revenue by type of PV technology used
    • Flexible BIPV roofing market by type of PV technology used
    • Flexible BIPV roofing market revenue by type of PV technology used
    • Monolithically integrated BIPV roofing market by type of PV technology used
    • Monolithically integrated BIPV roofing market revenue by type of PV technology used
    • Total roofing market revenue by product types
    • Forecast of non-glass BIPV wall markets
    • Share of entire BIPV walling market
    • WAPV material shipments by type of PV technology used
    • WAPV material shipments revenues by type of PV technology used 
    • Repurposed BIPV roofing material shipments by type of PV technology used
    • Repurposed BIPV roofing material shipments revenue by type of PV technology used in $ Millions
    • BIPV siding by type of PV technology used
    • BIPV siding revenue by type of PV technology used in $ Millions
    • Total walling market revenue by product types
    • BIPV glass (forecast by type of PV technology used, area, revenues, type of product)
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by area shipped (Million sq. meter)
    • Eight-year forecast of worldwide construction glass by type of building
    • Penetration of BIPV glass (%)
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by area shipped (Million sq. meter)
    • Eight-year forecast of efficiency of PV panels
    • BIPV glass by MW shipped by type of building
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by MW shipped (MW)
    • Pricing forecasts for BIPV glass by type of PV material
    • Average cost per watt by type of PV materials ($) 
    • BIPV glass by type of product
    • Flexible BIPV roofing market by type of PV technology used
    • Revenue forecast of BIPV glass by type of product
    • Type of products share in MW (%)
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by type of product ($ Millions)
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by area shipped (Million sq. meter)
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by MW shipped (MW)
    • Forecast of BIPV glass by type of material
    • Technology/material share in MW (%)
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by MW shipped (MW)
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass revenue by type of material ($ Millions)
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by area shipped (Million sq. meters)
    • BIPV market share by end-user segments
    • Forecast of non-glass BIPV market
    • BIPV roofing market by end-user segments in $ Millions
    • BIPV walling market by end-user segments in $ Millions
    • Forecast of BIPV glass market
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by type of building ($ Millions)
    • BIPV market by country/region
    • Forecasts by region:  By type of BIPV product
    • BIPV roofing market by country/region in $ Millions
    • BIPV walling market by country/region in $ Millions
    • Eight-year forecast of BIPV glass by country/region ($ Millions)
    • Forecast of materials/technology
    • Crystalline Si in BIPV market by product segment ($ Millions)
    • Thin-film Si in BIPV market by product segment ($ Millions)
    • CIGS in BIPV market by product segment ($ Millions)
    • CDTE in BIPV market by product segment ($ Millions)
    • OPV/DSC in BIPV market by product segment ($ Millions)
    • Worldwide building markets for BIPV by retrofit/new construction ($ Million)
    • Total BIPV substrate and encapsulation revenue by BIPV module type
    • Summary of BIPV market by product segment ($ Millions)
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-727 PUBLISHED June 23, 2014
Silver Inks and Pastes Markets: 2014-2021
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    This is the latest in NanoMarkets’ ongoing series of industry analysis reports on silver inks and pastes.  In this report we analyze how the changes within the applications for silver inks and pastes have impacted the business and what this means over the coming years.

    On the positive side, the solar panel industry is reviving and is much more oriented toward crystalline silicon (c-Si) panels than before the great solar crash.  This is good news for the silver pastes business, because c-Si panels are major consumes of silver.  Silver inks and pastes suppliers also have some reason to be hopeful about the likelihood of large OLED lighting and displays panels finally being commercialized, since silver undoubtedly has a role to play in OLED electrodes.

    The negatives for the silver inks and pastes business include the fact that plasma televisions and membrane switches, both which have consumed a considerable amount of silver pastes are phasing out and printed electronics is gradually being abandoned as a viable application by many suppliers.

    This report also examines the commercial implications for silver inks and paste markets.  In this year’s report, we place a special emphasis on the replacement of silver by copper in critical applications such as solar panels. We also re-examine the future of silver inks and pastes in the light of the rising Internet-of-Things meme and address whether or not there will there be demand for printed silver used within all those sensors and smart objects.  Finally, we take one more look to see if nanosilver inks will ever make it out of the “research material” category.

    In this evolving market environment, this report identifies which market opportunities for silver inks and pastes are likely to be the most important over the next decade.  And as with other NanoMarkets reports, we also include detailed eight-year forecasts in both volume and value terms, with breakouts by application, type of material and type of printing process used.  The report also contains an assessment of the product/market strategies of leading silver inks and pastes firms – both the traditional and the new suppliers that appearing from China and India.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 The Silver Inks and Pastes Market:  Luck Still Holding
    E.2 Thick Film: Signs of Life
    E.3 Solar Panel Prospects:  Silver Inks and Pastes Opportunities
    E.3.1 Using Less Silver per Panel
    E.3.2 Silver and the Future of Thin-Film PV
    E.4 Future Revenue Generation for Silver Inks/Pastes from Lighting, Displays, and Sensors
    E.5 Key Firms to Watch in the Silver Inks and Pastes Business
    E.5.1 Traditional Suppliers: DuPont, Henkel, and Heraeus
    E.5.2 Competition from Around the World
    E.6 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for Silver Inks and Pastes
    E.6.1 Impact of Silver Prices

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Changes Since the Last Report
    1.1.2 Continuing Prospects for Silver Inks and Pastes
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.3.1 Data Sources
    1.3.2 Forecasting Methodology
    1.3.3 Pricing Assumptions and Pricing Trends for Silver Inks and Pastes
    1.3.4 General Economic and Policy Assumptions
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Silver Inks and Pastes – Materials, Processes and Suppliers
    2.1 Legacy Materials: Thick-Film Pastes and Thin-Film Inks
    2.2 Opportunities for Nanosilver Beyond R&D
    2.3 Competing Materials
    2.3.1 Copper as a Potential Threat
    2.3.2 Carbon-based Conductive Inks
    2.4 Shifts in Processing and Printing Methods to Meet the Demand of Different Applications
    2.4.1 Alternative Printing Methods Hold Onto Niches
    2.4.2 Screen Printing Broadens Its Reach
    2.5 Key Suppliers of Silver Inks and Pastes
    2.5.1 Traditional Silver Materials Suppliers Focus on PV
    2.5.2 Offerings from PCB Materials Suppliers
    2.5.3 Nanosilver Suppliers Address Challenges
    2.5.4 Competition from China and India
    2.6 How Changes in Silver Prices Affect the Market for Silver Inks and Pastes
    2.7 Key Points from This Chapter

    Chapter Three: Photovoltaic Panels: Opportunities and Challenges for Silver Inks and Pastes
    3.1 Growth in Crystalline Si Helps Silver Paste Market
    3.2 Efforts to Reduce the Amount of Silver in Panels
    3.3 How Efforts to Improve Solar Cell Efficiency Affect Silver Paste Suppliers
    3.3.1 Changes in Printing Methods
    3.3.2 New Solar Cell Designs
    3.4 Competing PV Technologies a Potential Threat
    3.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Silver Inks/Pastes for PV– by PV Type and Usage
    3.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Silver Inks/Pastes for PV – by Type of Materials and Type of Printing Process
    3.7 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Four: Displays and Lighting as Markets for Silver Inks and Pastes
    4.1 Plasma TVs – a Dying Breed
    4.2 Opportunities for Silver in Growing Display Markets
    4.2.1 Liquid Crystal Displays
    4.2.2 Silver in Touch Displays
    4.2.3 What about OLED displays?
    4.3 Will OLED Lighting Provide a New Opportunity for Silver Inks and Pastes?
    4.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks/ Pastes for Displays – by Display Type and Type of Ink/Paste
    4.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Silver Inks/Pastes for Displays – by Type of Printing Process
    4.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks/ Pastes for OLED Lighting – by Type of Ink/Paste
    4.7 Eight-Year Forecast of Silver Inks/Pastes for OLED Lighting – by Type of Printing Process
    4.8 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Five:  Opportunities for Silver Inks/Pastes in Sensors
    5.1 Will the IoT be Good for Silver?
    5.1.1 Printed Silver in Sensors
    5.1.2 Opportunities in RFIDs
    5.2 RFID and Sensor Antennas:  Eight-Year Forecast by Type of Ink/Paste
    5.3 RFID and Sensor Applications: Eight-Year Forecast by Type of Ink/Paste
    5.4 Silver Inks/Pastes for RFID and Sensors by Type of Printing Process
    5.5 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Six:  Ongoing Opportunities for Silver Pastes in Thick-Film Electronics
    6.1 Thick-Film Opportunities:  Back to the Future
    6.2 Trends in Membrane Switches
    6.3 Trends in Silver for PCBs
    6.4 Other Thick-Film Applications
    6.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Silver Inks and Pastes Usage in Thick Film Applications
    6.6 Key Points from this Chapter
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibit

    Exhibit E-1: Silver Inks and Pastes:  Business Environment and Strategies    
    Exhibit E-2: Summary of the Market for Silver Inks and Pastes, by Application 2014-2021    
    Exhibit E-3: GRAND TOTAL Summary of the Market for Silver Inks and Pastes, by Ink/Paste Composition and Type 2014-2021    
    Exhibit E-4: Summary of the Market for Silver Inks and Pastes, by Printing Method 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 2-1: Use of High-Fire and Low-Temperature Silver Pastes, by Application    
    Exhibit 2-2: Advantages and Disadvantages of Nanosilver Compared to Conventional Printed Silver    
    Exhibit 2-3: Competing Materials to Silver, by Application    
    Exhibit 2-4: Silver Ink and Paste Suppliers and Target Applications    
    Exhibit 2-5: DuPont Strategy for PV Applications    
    Exhibit 3-1: Alternative Technologies to Reduce or Replace Silver in PV    
    Exhibit 3-2: Opportunities for Printed Silver in TFPV    
    Exhibit 3-3: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Crystalline Silicon (c-Si) and Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin Layer (HIT) PV    
    Exhibit 3-4: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in TFPV (all types) by PV Technology 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 3-5: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in TFPV (all types) 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 3-6: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in PV Applications by Printing Method 2014-2021
    Exhibit 3-7: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in PV Applications by Ink Type 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 4-1: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Displays, by Display Type (2014-2021)    
    Exhibit 4-2: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Displays by Ink Type 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 4-3: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Displays, by Ink/Paste Type and Printing Method (2014-2021)    
    Exhibit 4-4: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in OLED Lighting by Ink Type  2014-2021    
    Exhibit 4-5: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in OLED Lighting 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 5-1: Prospects for Printed Silver in Sensor/IoT Applications    
    Exhibit 5-2: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in RFID and Sensors 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 5-3: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in RFID Antennas by Ink Type  2014-2021    
    Exhibit 5-4: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Sensors by Ink Type 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 5-5: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in RFID Antennas by Printing Method 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 5-6: Eight Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes for Sensor Applications 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 6-1: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes for Traditional Thick-Film Applications 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 6-2: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes for Traditional Thick-Film Applications by Printing Method 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 6-3: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Traditional Thick-Film Applications by Ink Type 2014-2021

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-725 PUBLISHED June 19, 2014
Radiation Detection Markets: 2014-2021
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY
    This report follows on from NanoMarkets’ successful reports on radiation detection equipment and radiation detection materials in 2013.  It identifies the new opportunities that continue to emerge from the sales of equipment designed to detect ionization radiation.  In many ways the medical detection equipment market is quite mature.  But its customers can often be found in areas that change with shifting socioeconomic conditions.  For example, a major market for radiation detection is in the nuclear power industry; a sector that rises and falls according to the energy policies of the day.  Another major purchaser of radiation detection gear is healthcare, a demand that is boosted by the aging population in developed countries
     
    The customer base for radiation detection equipment is very broad and includes the food, pharmaceutical  and mining industries, as well as the medical and nuclear power sectors mentioned above.  In addition, radiation detection is used in both the military and domestic security. The bottom line is that while radiation detection may be settled technology, it continues to deliver value and evolve with changing needs.
     
    In this report, we explore the revenue potential for radiation detection over the next eight years in three diverse market sectors:  industrial and laboratory, security and medical.  The report also includes eight-year (volume and value) forecasts for key sensors used in radiation detection applications, such as medical gamma cameras, RIIDS, portal monitors, PET detectors, oil exploration and scientific sensors, etc.  As in NanoMarkets previous reports in this space, all demand forecasts in this report are segmented by device type and world region. In addition, this report analyzes the products and marketing strategies of the leading suppliers of radiation detection equipment in the markets covered.
     
    NanoMarkets believes that business development executives and product management professionals, as well as investors and entrepreneurs, involved with radiation detection equipment will benefit from the comprehensive analysis or the radiation detection equipment included in this report which:
    • Identifies major sectors using radiation detection systems.
    • Lists out opportunities for devices in traditional and un-conventional applications
    • Points out technological advancements in the field of radiations and identifies detectors beneficial for developing efficient systems and devices.
    • Analyzes different types of detectors, their advantages and limitations for certain applications 
    • Details the dynamics of the radiation based industry
    • Discusses products available in the market and continual endeavors of their manufacturers
    • Analyzes the geographical pattern of usage of radiation detectors in coherence with certain applications and their respective domains
    • Signifies new opportunities and challenges in this sector
    • Discusses the role of prominent regulations and regulatory authorities in monitoring radiation levels and exposures
    • Assessing forecast of detectors in various applicative domains for the next eight years.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Changes Since Our 2013 Report
    E.2 New Opportunities for Radiation Detection Equipment
    E.2.1 Domestic Security and Military Applications
    E 2.2 Industrial/Occupational Safety – Including the Nuclear Power Industry
    E 2.3 X-Ray and Nuclear Medicine
    E.3 Companies to Watch in the Radiation Detection Business
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecast for Radiation Detection Equipment
     
    Chapter One Introduction
    1.1 Background to the Report
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.3.1 Market Forecasting Methodology
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Markets for Radiation Detection in Military Operations and Domestic Security
    2.1 Domestic Security
    2.1.1 Detectors in Civilian Areas
    2.1.2 Passenger Checking at Airports
    2.1.3 First Responders:  Police, Fire and Ambulance
    2.1.4 Types of Radiation Detectors Used for Domestic Security
    2.1.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Radiation Detection Equipment Used in Domestic Security
    2.2 Radiation in the Military  
    2.2.1 Types of Radiation Detectors Used by the Military
    2.2.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Radiation Detection Equipment Used by the Military
    2.3 Main Suppliers of Detectors Used by the Military and Domestic Security
    2.4 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Markets for Radiation Detection Equipment in General Industrial and Scientific Applications
    3.1 General Industrial Applications
    3.1.1 Oil and Mining Industry
    3.1.2 Scrap Metal Recycling
    3.1.3 Food Irradiation
    3.1.4 Emerging Industrial Users of Radiation Detection Equipment
    3.1.4 Types of Radiation Detectors Used in General Industrial Applications
    3.1.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Radiation Detection Equipment Used in General Industrial Applications
    3.2 Pharmaceutical Industry
    3.2.1 Kinetic Modeling of Drugs
    3.2.2 Drug Formulation Designing: Radiopharmaceuticals
    3.2.3 Types of Radiation Detectors Used in Pharma
    3.3 Nuclear Energy Industry
    3.3.1 Permanent Detectors at Nuclear Reactor Sites
    3.3.2 Radiation Detection in Vicinity of Nuclear Sites
    3.3.3 Types of Radiation Detectors Used in the Nuclear Power Industry
    3.3.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Radiation Detection Equipment Used in Nuclear Power
    3.4 Radiation in Scientific Laboratories
    3.4.1 High Energy Physics and Astrophysics
    3.4.2 Medical Laboratories
    3.4.3 Types of Radiation Detectors Used in Laboratories
    3.4.4 Customized Detection Equipment for Laboratories
    3.4.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Radiation Detection Equipment Used in Laboratories
    3.5 Radioactive Waste Management
    3.6 Main Suppliers of Industrial Radiation Detectors Used
    3.8 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four Market for Medical X-Ray Detection  
    4.1 Radiography
    4.2 Densitometry
    4.3 Computed Tomography (CT)
    4.3.1 Radiation Dose Drivers in CT
    4.3.2 Opportunities in Volumetric CT
    4.4 Medical X-Ray Radiology
    4.4.1 Digital Mammography
    4.5 Types of Radiation Detectors Used in Medical X-Ray Detection
    4.6 Main Suppliers of Detectors Used in Medical X-Ray Detection
    4.7 Eight-Year Forecasts of Radiation Detection Equipment Used in Medical X-Ray Detection
    4.8 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Five Market for Medical Gamma Radiation Detection 
    5.1 Nuclear Medicine
    5.1.1 Image-Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT)
    5.1.2 Radiotherapy, Phytotherapy Opportunities
    5.2 Gamma Cameras
    5.3 Combined SPECT Techniques
    5.3.1 SPECT/CT
    5.3.2 SPECT/MRI
    5.4 PET Detectors
    5.4.1 PET/CT
    5.4.2 PET/MRI
    5.5 Main Suppliers of Detectors Used in Medical Gamma Radiation Detection
    5.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Radiation Detection Equipment Used in Gamma Radiation Detection
    5.7 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Six Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts for Radiation Detection Equipment
    6.1 Forecast of Radiation Detection Equipment Markets by Type of Detector
    6.2 Forecast of Radiation Detection Equipment Markets by End User Sector
    6.3 Forecast of Radiation Detection Equipment Markets by Region/Country        
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-723 PUBLISHED June 12, 2014
OLED Materials Markets – 2014
CATEGORIES :
  • OLEDs
  • SUMMARY
    At the big picture level, not much seems to have changed in the OLED materials space since NanoMarkets reported on it in 2013.  It is still a business that is dominated by Samsung and one that appears to be perpetually waiting; for OLED TVs, for OLED lighting and for solution processed OLED panels.
     
    The arrival or non-arrival of large OLED lighting panels and TVs will have a profound impact on the amount of OLED materials that will be needed, while solution processing will need a different kind of OLED material. These factors are just as important to the OLED materials business as they were in 2013.  But they remain just as uncertain.
     
    This is not to say that nothing happened during 2013 in the world of OLED materials.  Mobile OLED displays got bigger to meet the needs of tablets and “phablets.”  This may not give the boost to the OLED materials firms that they hoped for from OLED TVs and lighting panels, but it is significant in terms of market growth for the OLED materials sector.  In addition, important things happened at the corporate level, most notably the acquisition of Novaled by Cheil/Samsung and the disappearance of Plextronics.  We also note that there are a growing number of Chinese OLED materials suppliers who are making claims that they are selling to the OLED display makers in Korea as well as to the emerging OLED industry in China itself.
     
    In this year’s report, in addition to NanoMarkets’ usual granular, material-by-material projections of OLED materials, we focus on analysis of how OLED materials supply chains are shaping up and what the long-term factors for marketing success for OLED materials suppliers will be.  And, of course, we also discuss the latest technical developments in OLED materials and architectures.
     
    This report contains detailed volume and revenue forecasts for materials used for OLEDs broken out by application, material type, functionality, and deposition method wherever possible.  NanoMarkets has been providing industry analysis of the OLED materials market for seven years, and it is the leading supplier of analysis in the OLED lighting space.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary:  Strategies and Opportunities
    E.1 Changes in the OLED Market Since Our 2013 Report
    E.1.1 Small Displays are Getting Bigger:  Implications for Materials
    E.1.2 OLED TVs Have Not Yet Arrived:  A Massive Uncertainty for the OLED Materials Space
    E.1.3 OLED Lighting:  Do Materials Suppliers Still Care?
    E.1.4 Solution Processed OLED Materials:  State of the Art
    E.2 Supply Chain Developments
    E.2.1 The Novaled Acquisition
    E.2.2 Developments at UDC
    E.2.3 Ongoing Opportunities for Major Specialty Chemical Companies
    E.2.4 The Growing Importance of Chinese Suppliers
    E.2.5 The Future Japanese OLED Materials Players
    E.3 IP Matters
    E.4 Summaries of OLED Materials Eight-Year Forecasts
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two:  End User Markets and Supply Chain
    2.1 Samsung and its Materials Suppliers
    2.1.2 Implications of the Novaled Acquisition
    2.2 Universal Display Corporation's Central Role
    2.3 Other Cell Phone/Tablet Suppliers
    2.3.1 Likely Use of OLEDs
    2.3.2 Will Apple Ever Adopt OLEDs?
    2.3.3 Opportunities for Supplying OLED Materials to non-Samsung Cell Phone/Tablet Makers
    2.4 The OLED TV Market
    2.4.1 Scenarios for Market Evolution
    2.4.2 Potential Role for Solution Processing
    2.4.3 Likely Materials Suppliers and Materials Supply Chain Evolution for OLED TVs
    2.5 OLED Lighting
    2.5.1 Scenarios for Market Evolution
    2.5.2 Special Requirements for Materials and Processes in Lighting Applications
    2.5.3 Likely Materials Suppliers and Materials Supply Chain Evolution for OLED TVs
    2.6 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: OLED Materials and Eight-Year Market Forecasts
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology and Assumptions
    3.1.1 Changes from Last Year's Forecast
    3.1.2 OLED Materials Pricing Assumptions
    3.1.3 General Economic Assumptions
    3.2 Panel Area Forecasts for OLED Panels by Application:  Displays and Lighting
    3.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Emissive Layer Materials
    3.3.1 Emitters and Hosts in OLED Displays
    3.3.2 Emitters and Hosts in OLED Lighting
    3.3.3 Summary of Forecasts for Emissive Layer Materials
    3.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electron Transport Materials
    3.4.1 ETLs in OLED Displays
    3.4.2 ETLs in OLED Lighting
    3.4.3 Summary of Forecasts for ETL Materials in OLEDs
    3.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Hole Transport, Hole Blocking, and Electron Blocking Materials
    3.5.1 HTL/HBL/EBL Materials in OLED Displays
    3.5.2 HTL/HBL/EBL Materials in OLED Lighting
    3.5.3 Summary of HTL/HBL/EBL Materials
    3.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Hole Injection Layer Materials
    3.6.1 HIL Materials in OLED Displays
    3.6.2 HIL Materials in OLED Lighting
    3.6.3 Summary of HIL Materials
    3.7 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electrode Materials in OLEDs
    3.8.1 Cathode Materials
    3.8.2 Anode Materials
    3.8.3 Summary of Forecasts for Electrodes in OLEDs
    3.9 OLED Encapsulation Material Forecasts
    3.10 Eight-Year Forecasts of Substrates in OLEDs
    3.10.1 Materials Used As OLED Substrates
    3.10.2 Substrates in OLED Displays
    3.10.3 Substrates in OLED Lighting
    3.10.4 Summaries of Forecasts for Substrates in OLEDs–Glass, Plastic, and Metal
    3.11 Summaries of Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Materials
    3.11.1 Summaries of Forecasts for Core Functional OLED Materials
    3.11.2 Grand Total Summaries of All OLED Materials
    3.12 Alternative Scenarios
     
    Acronyms and Abbreviations
    About the Author
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-713 PUBLISHED May 27, 2014
Smart Lighting Markets-2014; V1. Market Drivers and Forecasts
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY
    NanoMarkets has been covering the smart lighting market for four years and has acquired an understanding of the key markets, technologies and companies in this rapidly expanding business.  This year, NanoMarkets has decided to cover this interesting sector in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to an analysis of smart lighting markets and covering the basic drivers and economics of the smart lighting business.  Volume II provides coverage of the leading companies, products and technologies that play in the smart lighting market place.
     
    Together both volumes identify where and how the new business for smart lighting systems will appear over the next eight years as the developed world replaces its lighting infrastructure with solid-state lighting (SSL), especially LEDs.
     
    While many smart lighting systems can control compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), there is little doubt that the smart lighting products of the future will primarily intended for LED control.  This is not just because LEDs are the “lighting of the future,” but also because they potentially permit very high levels of control compared with previous generations of lighting.  With this in mind, this report examines how the latest control and sensor technologies will impact the development of future smart lighting products.
     
    Many existing smart lighting systems are intended primarily to add to LEDs’ already impressive energy efficiency.  This makes strategic sense given current concerns about rising real energy prices.  However, NanoMarkets believes that with the market becoming crowded, suppliers of smart lighting systems will need to find new ways to differentiate themselves in the market, either by (1) exploring new end user markets such as street lighting or auto lighting, or (2) adding new functionality such as health and mood lighting or even visible light communications (VLC). The latest lighting research indicates that smart lighting can also lead to improved health and mood, while newer technology is showing the way to using smart lighting systems for air quality monitoring and even the delivery of information services. 
     
    While smart lighting systems have evolved as standalone products, NanoMarkets notes that, in this Internet-of-Things era, the smart lighting business must be seen as part of a bigger picture.  In particular, in this report we discuss the opportunities that are expected to emerge as smart lighting systems increasingly interface with building and home automation products.
     
    In this year’s reports, we have considerably extended the report coverage to include analysis beyond the energy-saving features of smart lighting to other business opportunities that the arrival of smart lighting is creating.  This is – in particular – the focus of Volume I -- But as with NanoMarkets previous report on smart lighting, our 2014 reports show how new value is being created in the lighting market by adding enhanced electronics and intelligent luminaires and how such product strategies will be able to build on the massive trend towards introducing LED lighting. 
     
    Also included in Volume II is an analysis of the smart lighting strategies of the firms that NanoMarkets expects to see as major players in the smart lighting space.  We examine what the prospects for start-ups are in this space.  And in Volume I there is an eight-year market forecast with breakouts by type of product, end user market segment, and the regions/countries where this report will be sold.
     
    Because of our years of coverage in this field, NanoMarkets believes that our 2014 reports provide the best information and analysis available on the current trends in the smart lighting sector.  We include a detailed eight-year forecast with breakouts by functionality and type of end user, as well as analyses of product/market strategies being deployed by leading firms in the smart lighting space.  We believe that these reports will prove of value to executives throughout the lighting, semiconductor, sensor and networking industries.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 What has Changed Since NanoMarkets' 2013 Smart Lighting Report
    E.1.1 Progress in LED Deployment
    E.1.2 Smart Lighting Market Evolution
    E.2 Current Challenges in the Smart Lighting Market
    E.3 The Evolving Smart Lighting Supply Chain
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Markets
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    1.4 Drivers for Smart Lighting
    1.4.1 Energy Efficiency:  Policy and Cost Consideration
    1.4.2 How Important Will Mood/Performance Enhancement as a Market Driver for Smart Lighting
    1.4.3 Aesthetic Factors Driving and Retarding the Smart Lighting Market
    1.4.4 Visible Light Communications
    1.5 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two:  Smart Lighting:  Regional and National Markets
    2.1 United States Markets for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.1.1 Regulatory and Building Code Environment:  Impact of LEED, EISA, etc.
    2.1.2 Other Factors Shaping the Market for Smart Lighting Systems in the US
    2.2 Markets for Smart Lighting Systems in Japan
    2.2.1 Smart Lighting Systems and the Success of LEDs in Japan
    2.2.2 Other Factors Shaping the Market for Smart Lighting Systems in Japan
    2.3 Markets for Smart Lighting Systems in China
    2.3.1 Smart Lighting Systems in the Context of the Chinese Industrial Policy
    2.3.2 Other Factors Shaping the Market for Smart Lighting Systems in China
    2.4 Korean Markets for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.4.1 Impact of Korean Government Energy and Industrial Policy
on Smart Lighting Systems Markets
    2.5 European Markets for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.5.1 Impact of Recent Changes in European Energy and Environmental Policy on Smart Lighting Systems
    2.5.2 National Factors
    2.5.3 Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Lighting Systems by Country/Region
     
    Chapter Three: Smart Lighting in Business Establishments
    3.1 Worldwide Office/Industrial Construction Trends:  Impact on the Smart Lighting Market
    3.1.1 Special Considerations for Educational Establishments
    3.1.2 Smart Lighting in Retail Locations
    3.1.3 Healthcare Facilities as a Market for Smart Lighting Systems
    3.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting in Business Establishments
    3.2.1 Eight-Year Forecasts for Office Buildings
    3.2.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Industrial Buildings
    3.2.3 Eight-Year Forecasts for Retail Locations
    3.2.4 Eight-Year Forecasts for Healthcare Facilities
    3.2.5 Eight-Year Forecasts for Educational Establishments
    3.2.6 Eight-Year Forecasts by Region/Country
     
    Chapter Four: Smart Lighting in Residential Markets
    4.1 Residential Buildings as a Market for Smart Lighting:  Current Residential Lighting Systems
    4.1.1 Worldwide Residential Construction Trends:  Impact on the Smart Lighting Market
    4.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Lighting Systems in for Residential Locations
    4.2.1 Eight-Year Forecast by Single-Family/Multi-Tenant
    4.2.2 Eight-Year Forecasts by Region/Country
     
    Chapter Five: Smart Lighting in Other Markets 
    5.1 Outdoor Lighting
    5.1.1 Smart Street Lighting
    5.1.2 Other Smart Outdoor Lighting
    5.1.3 Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Lighting Systems for Outdoor Locations
    5.2 Automotive Applications for Smart Lighting
    5.2.1 Specialized Smart Lighting Products for Automobiles
    5.2.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Lighting Systems for Automotive Applications
    5.3 Smart Lighting in Horticulture and Urban Farms
    5.3.1 Specialized Smart Lighting Products for Horticulture and Urban Farms
    5.3.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Lighting Systems for Horticulture and Urban Farms
     
    Chapter Six: Summary of Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Lighting Systems Markets
    6.1 Eight-Year Forecasts by Application
    6.2 Eight-Year Forecast by Type of System
    6.3 Eight-Year Forecast by New Build or Retrofit
    6.4 Eight-Year Forecast by Region/Country
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-721 PUBLISHED May 13, 2014
OLED Lighting Markets-2014
CATEGORIES :
  • OLEDs
  • SUMMARY
    Six years ago, OLED lighting was first being proposed as a serious commercial product.  Back then, 2014 was projected as the year when OLED lighting would first make its impact felt on general illumination.  It didn’t happen. OLED lighting has been available for four years now, but with few signs of its moving beyond the luxury and specialist lighting sector.  Also, the disappearance of GE from this space is another reason to treat OLED lighting with a little less respect than it once had.
     
    So is it time to wave goodbye to OLED lighting as a large-scale business opportunity and label it “niche only?” The case can be made.  But then again some large lighting suppliers remain bullish on this technology and appear to mean what they say. 
     
    Also, the fate of OLED lighting remains of importance well beyond the lighting sector.  Because OLED consist of large panels, their success or failure has major implications for both the OLED materials sector and the OLED market itself.  Even a modest success for OLED lighting could quickly make it the largest segment of the OLED business; which would completely change the market orientation of the OLED market from one that is currently oriented towards small mobile displays.
     
    In this complex market environment, NanoMarkets believes that it is time for a detailed and honest assessment of both the current value proposition and future revenue timeframes for OLED lighting.  This is the objective of this report, which includes eight-year (volume and value) projections of OLED lighting in all the major market sectors along with an assessment of how OLED lighting can effectively compete with LEDs and CFLs in those segments.  In addition, this report  analyzes the core strategies of leading players in the OLED lighting space, including their plans for building manufacturing capacity for OLED lighting.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary

    • Objectives and scope of this report 
    • Methodology and information sources 
    • Plan of report
    • Major changes from the previous report 
    • Will OLED lighting ever be more than a luxury niche?  
    • Who will shape the future of the OLED lighting Industry? 
    • Geographies: Thoughts on national and regional OLED lighting markets
    • Opportunities for OLED lighting start-ups
    • Implications for OLED material companies
    • Summary of eight-year forecasts of OLED lighting markets

    Chapter One: Introduction

    • Global presence of the OLED lighting industry
    • Commercial application trends
    • Performance comparison: Key parameters
    • Favorable factors for the industry
    • Key Issues faced by the industry
    • Trends in OLED material deposition techniques
    • Ways to achieve cost reduction targets
    • Material and process improvement timeline
    • Current production facility of key OLED lighting players
    • Status of commercial availability of OLED lighting
    • Companies involved and major investments
    • OLED lighting industry: Possible market scenarios


    Chapter Two: Manufacturing, Materials and Performance Trends Shaping OLED Lighting Commercialization

    • Key performance factors impacting the success of OLED lighting
    • OLED light performance: current status and future targets
    • OLED light performance: What can be expected
    • Lifetime trends: in need of a substantial enhancement
    • Key efficacy issues and probable solutions
    • Bigger OLED panels: Key developments
    • Migration toward large panels: a necessary development
    • Large sized panels: Final verdict
    • Luminance trends: Key strategies for improvement
    • Color warmth: Not a major problem
    • OLED light performance: Impact on addressable market
    • Flexible (Curved) OLED
    • Flexible OLED panels: The reality
    • The question of flexible OLEDs in automobiles
    • Practical manufacturing issues requiring industry’s attention
    • Manufacturing factors shaping OLED lighting industry
    • Cost reduction Initiative: Choice of deposition process
    • Solution processing process: Key developments
    • Encapsulation: A major technical hurdle to fabrication
    • Choice of materials: Organic stack components
    • Choice of materials: Substrates
    • Choice of materials: Light extraction materials
    • OLED Production Yields: Key developments
    • OLED lighting manufacturing capacity estimation
    • Manufacturing capacity expansion Plans: Key players
    • European panel makers: Lagging behind Asian counterparts
    • Manufacturing approach: Current expectations
    • Manufacturing approach: What can be expected
    • Manufacturing cost trends
    • Cost structure: Comparison and key reduction drivers
    • OLED lighting commercialization catalyst
    • Key points made in this chapter

    Chapter Three:  Addressable Markets for OLED Lighting - Actual and Potential

    • Status of OLED lighting
    • Forecasting assumptions
    • Key consumer markets: A geographic analysis
    • Asia at the forefront of commercialization
    • European R&D efforts to enhance the prospects for OLED lighting
    • Share by country of OLED lighting consumption
    • OLED luminaire trends: Design, cost and other factors
    • Designer kits and samples: Market evolution
    • Trends in designer kits and samples 
    • Eight-year forecast of designer kits and samples
    • Office lighting: A killer application? 
    • Eight-year forecast of office and commercial lighting applications
    • Potential use of OLEDs in residential lighting 
    • Eight-year forecast of residential lighting applications
    • Scope of OLEDs in outdoor (non-automotive) lighting 
    • Encapsulation issues in outdoor lighting
    • Eight-year forecast of outdoor lighting applications 
    • Scope of OLEDs in outdoor (non-automotive) lighting 
    • Promise of OLED lighting for cars and other vehicles
    • Potential hurdles to OLED in external automobile lighting 
    • Scope of OLED lighting in internal transportation lighting
    • Eight-year forecast of automotive lighting applications
    • Evaluation of OLED lighting in large-scale custom installations
    • Eight-year forecast of customized large-scale custom installations
    • Summary of eight-year forecasts of OLED lighting
    • Key points made in this chapter

    List of Forecast Exhibits

    • Summary of eight-year forecasts of OLED lighting markets
    • Forecasting assumptions
    • Eight-year forecast of designer kits and samples
    • Eight-year forecast of office and commercial lighting applications
    • Eight-year forecast of residential lighting applications
    • Eight-year forecast of outdoor lighting applications 
    • Share by country of OLED lighting consumption
    • Eight-year forecast of automotive lighting applications
    • Eight-year forecast of customized large-scale custom installations
    • Summary of eight-year forecasts of OLED lighting
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Single User $3,995.00  
Advanced (up to 5 users) $4,995.00  
Enterprise $5,995.00  
REPORT # ST-005 PUBLISHED May 05, 2014
3D Printing 2014: A Survey of SmarTech’s Annual Market Findings
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    In 2013, 3D printing grew up.  World-class manufacturers shifted their 3D printing focus from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacturing; Some of largest consumer firms – Amazon, HP, Microsoft, Staples and UPS – began to pursue 3D opportunities; New commercialization directions for 3D-printed medical and dental implants and prosthetics accelerated.  Meanwhile, the IPO and M&A acquisition activity continued apace.

    In this report, SmarTech provides an insider perspective on the latest 3D printing opportunities in this dynamic market environment.  We pinpoint where the smart money will go in the 3D printing sector and how firms will be changing their business models and processes to profit from 3D printing.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One: Industry Overview
    1.1 Business Climate Assessment: Will 2014 Be the Year of 3D Printing?
    1.2 The Ten Largest Developments In 2013-2014
    1.2.1 Equipment Manufacturers Gear Up Their Service Offerings
    1.2.2 Accelerating 3DP Product Release Schedules
    1.2.3 OEMs Consolidate Materials Supply Chains
    1.2.4 Materials Manufacturers Get Involved As Well
    1.2.5 3DP Companies Appeal to Public Markets for New Capital
    1.2.6 Consolidation In the Personal Printer Market
    1.2.7 The Big Three Public 3DP Companies Miss Their Mark
    1.2.8 The Next Generation of 3DP Manufacturing Systems
    1.3 The Ten Biggest Questions for 2014
    1.3.1 Will the Slew Of 3D Printing IPOs Continue?
    1.3.2 Will Eastern Companies Make a Splash In Western Markets?
    1.3.3 Will the Big Guys Jump Into the 3DP Space?
    1.3.4 Can Strides Be Made for Parts Qualification?
    1.3.5 Will Patent Expirations Drive Another Round of Start-ups?
    1.3.6 Will Industry Growth Rates Continue And New Profitable Opportunities Reveal Themselves?
    1.3.7 Can High-Grade Thermoplastics Become Viable Metal Substitutes?
    1.4 New Printing Processes Promise New Growth
    1.5 3DP Software Outlook
    1.5.1 Establishing Communication Standards CAD/CAM Software
    1.5.2 New Opportunities In Software
    1.5.3 Co-creation Software
    1.6 Materials Overview 2014
    1.6.1 New Materials Outlook
    1.7 Thinking About 3DP as a Collection of Many Technologies
    1.8 Competition or Co-Opetition?
    1.9 How Governments are Playing the 3DP Game
    1.9.1 Funding In the U.S.
    1.9.2 Funding In China
    1.9.3 Funding In Europe
    1.10 The Five Biggest Markets for 3D Printing
    1.11 Other Opportunities For AM
    1.11.1 Architecture
    1.11.2 Design Industry Applications
    1.11.3 Consumer Products
    1.11.4 Nano-Materials Development and Qualification
    1.12 Summary Forecasts

    Chapter Two: The Aerospace Market for AM
    2.1 The AM Value Proposition for Aerospace
    2.1.1 Weight and Lead Time Reduction are Key Value Drivers
    2.2 Assessing the “Sweet Spots” of Current 3DP Equipment
    2.2.1 FDM and SL Processes
    2.2.2 Plastic Laser Sintering Processes
    2.2.3 Metal Powder Laser Sintering Processes
    2.3 Opportunities In the Commercial Aerospace Industry
    2.3.1 Cabin Components
    2.3.2 Hinges and Brackets
    2.3.3 Pressurized Lines
    2.3.4 Airducts
    2.3.5 Housing Components
    2.3.6 Engine Components
    2.3.7 Wing Spar Components
    2.4 Opportunities In Military/Defense Aerospace Industry
    2.4.1 Missiles
    2.4.2 Military Aircraft and the JSF
    2.4.3 UAVs
    2.5 Opportunities In Space Applications
    2.5.1 Satellites
    2.5.2 Mars Rover Mission
    2.5.3 Rockets
    2.5.4 Printing In Space
    2.6 New Materials
    2.7 Getting 3DP Parts Onto the Next-Generation Commercial Planes
    2.8 Renewed Interest in Non-Powder Bed Based Processes
    2.9 Model-Based Enterprise
    2.10 In-Situ Monitoring Systems Are Key for Aerospace
    2.11 Will 3D Printing Change the Structure of the Aerospace Industry?
    2.12 10-Year Forecasts For Aerospace Products

    Chapter Three: The Medical Market for AM
    3.1 Medical Modeling
    3.2 Cutting Guides and Patient Specific Instruments
    3.2.1 Measured Benefits of 3DP PSIs and Surgical Models
    3.2.2 Recent Recall of the Shape Match Cutting Guide
    3.3 3DP-Enabled Customization Ushers Next Level of Orthopedic Implants
    3.3.1 Other Opportunities In Orthopedic Implants
    3.3.2 The Role Osseointegration Plays In the Rise of 3DP Implants
    3.3.3 Lattice Software
    3.3.4 High-Grade Plastics In Orthopedic Implants
    3.4 Bio-Printing Markets
    3.5 Markets for 3DP Prosthetics
    3.6 3DP Hearing Aid Component Market
    3.7 Medical Equipment Hardware/ Prototypes Component Market
    3.8 Medical Materials Outlook
    3.9 3DP In the Operating Room: Fact or Fiction?
    3.10 How Will Regulatory Bodies Treat Orthopedic Implants?
    3.11 10-Year Forecasts for Medical Products

    Chapter Four: The Dental Market for AM
    4.1 The Advantages 3DP Brings to the Dental Industry
    4.2 3DP Aligns With Trends In the Dental Industry
    4.3 3DP Dental In Emerging Economies
    4.3.1 3DP With Face Complications Gaining Market Share In The Short-Term
    4.3.2 Flexible 3DP Dental Solutions are Key to Driving Adoption In the Dental Industry
    4.4 3DP Is an Advantaged Substitute to CNC-Based Manufacturing Systems
    4.5 Opportunities In Dental Models
    4.5.1 Materials Opportunities In Dental Modeling
    4.6 Opportunities In Lost Wax Models
    4.7 Opportunities In Dental Temporaries
    4.8 Drill Guides
    4.9 Orthodontic Aligners
    4.10 3D-Printing Brings a New Meaning to Customized Dental Solutions
    4.11 10-Year Forecasts For Dental Products

    Chapter Five: The Automotive Market for AM
    5.1 AM Driving Innovation
    5.2 3DP Continues To Augment Functional Prototyping Activities
    5.2.1 Improvements Coming Down the Pipeline
    5.2.2 Infusing Workforces With a Renewed Creativity
    5.3 Realizing Flexible Supply Chains With 3D-Printed Tooling
    5.3.1 Opportunities for Large Format Sand 3DP Equipment In Rapid Automotive Tooling
    5.4 3DP’s Effect on the Auto Replacement Part Supply Chain
    5.5 Performance Automotive Opportunities
    5.6 Customization Opportunities for Luxury Vehicles
    5.7 10-Year Forecasts for Automotive Products

    Chapter Six: Personal/Educational Markets for AM
    6.1 A Shifting Personal Printer Landscape
    6.2 Understanding the Divide Between the Big Three Personal Printing Companies and the Little Guys
    6.3 Crowd Sourcing Role In the Personal Printer Market
    6.4 What Is the Magic Price Point for Personal 3DP?
    6.5 Opportunities In SL Personal Printers
    6.6 Opportunities In Personal 3DP Peripherals
    6.6.1 Personal 3DP Scanners
    6.6.2 “Killer” Apps
    6.6.3 3DP Pens
    6.7 Opportunities In Personal Printing Materials
    6.8 Opportunities for 3DP In Education
    6.9 10-Year Forecasts for Personal Printer Products

    Chapter Seven: Other Forecasts

    About SmarTech Markets Publishing
    About the Analyst
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report

    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit 1-1: Materials Companies' Recent Moves Into 3DP
    Exhibit 1-2: New Large Format Printer Releases
    Exhibit 1-3: New High Growth 3DP Technologies
    Exhibit 1-4: New Opportunities In Software
    Exhibit 1-5: New Materials With Large Profit Potential
    Exhibit 1-6: Institutions Formed as Part of the NNMI Initiative
    Exhibit 1-7: Primary Markets for 3DP Over the Next Ten Years
    Exhibit 1-8: Markets for 3DP Products in the Design Industry
    Exhibit 1-9: Intriguing Opportunities In Consumer Products
    Exhibit 1-10: Summary Forecasts for the 3DP Market by Product Category
    Exhibit 1-11: Summary Forecasts for the 3DP Market By Industry
    Exhibit 1-12: Total Printers Sold by Application (Number of Systems)
    Exhibit 1-13: Total 3DP Equipment Market By Printer Class (%)
    Exhibit 1-14: Total Printers Sold by Industry (Number of Systems)
    Exhibit 2-1: Value Drivers for the AM Industry
    Exhibit 2-2: Factors Limiting the Addressable Market for Metal Powder Bed 3DP Parts
    Exhibit 2-3: Addressable Market for Metal Powder Bed AM Parts
    Exhibit 2-4: Engine Components Suitable for 3DP Manufacturing
    Exhibit 2-5: Total 3DP Aerospace Market
    Exhibit 2-6: Aerospace Printers Sold By Printer Category (Number of Systems)
    Exhibit 3-1: Major Commercially Available PSI Systems
    Exhibit 3-2: Advantages of 3DP PSI Implementation
    Exhibit 3-3: Other Orthopedic Implants Being Explored By 3DP
    Exhibit 3-4: Advantages of High-Grade Plastics Over Titanium
    Exhibit 3-5: Bio-Printing Commercialization Timeline
    Exhibit 3-6: Benefits 3D Printing Can Bring To the Prosthetics Market
    Exhibit 3-7: Total 3DP Medical Market
    Exhibit 3-8: Medical Printers Sold By Printer Category (Number of Systems)
    Exhibit 4-1: Global Trends In the Dental Industry
    Exhibit 4-2: Forces Affecting Short-Term Adoption of 3DP In Dental
    Exhibit 4-3: Benefits of 3D Printing Temporaries Over CNC Milling
    Exhibit 4-4: Benefits of Producing Wax Printers
    Exhibit 4-5: 3DP Dental Implant Categories
    Exhibit 4-6: Total 3DP Dental Market
    Exhibit 4-7: Dental Printers Sold By Printer Category (Number of Systems)
    Exhibit 5-1: Tooling Applications for Different 3DP Processes
    Exhibit 5-2: Total 3DP Auto Market
    Exhibit 5-3: Auto Printers Sold By Printer Category (Number of systems)
    Exhibit 6-1: Benefits of PLA in the Personal and Education Markets
    Exhibit 6-2: Main Opportunities for 3DP in Education
    Exhibit 6-3: Total 3DP Personal/Education Market
    Exhibit 6-4: Personal/Education Printers Sold By Printer Category (Number of Systems)
    Exhibit 7-1: Total 3DP "Other" Market
    Exhibit 7-2: Other Printers Sold By Printer Category (Number of Systems)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-717 PUBLISHED April 30, 2014
CIGS Photovoltaics Markets-2014 and Beyond
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY

    The industry shakeout in CIGS PV has been brutal.  In 2010 there were more than 25 companies with plans for over 1 GW of capacity, but to date only Solar Frontier has achieved the goal.  As the shakeout continued, there were even questions whether any new capacity would be added beyond the approximately 3 GW that was in place as the CIGS sector faced extreme price pressure from falling silicon based PV. Nonetheless, NanoMarkets believes that while multiple start-ups have either been liquidated or acquired, the remaining few large CIGS players are poised to add significant capacity. 

    This report will analyze the opportunities that are emerging for CIGS in this very new phase of the solar industry.  The report takes a detailed look into the technical evolution of CIGs fabrication and encapsulation and show how this will impact CIGS market expansion and cost reduction. Much of the report is devoted to the opportunities for CIGS in building-integrated PV (BIPV market) and how CIGS flexible modules and price parity with silicon solar panels could considerably improve the revenues generated by CIGS technology in the near future.

    This report also includes NanoMarkets’ eight-year forecasts of the market for CIGS PV.  These forecasts are broken down by type of application—BIPV, flexible devices, etc.—and by the manufacturing technology used, including deposition technology and flexible vs. rigid manufacturing.  This report is essential reading for firms that manufacture or develop CIGS PV and for everyone interested in future of the PV industry.

    NanoMarkets has been following the CIGS space since its earliest days and this report provides the latest and most up to date information on the current state of the CIGS and guidance with regard to its future development and growth.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary    
    E.1 CIGS:  Finally Poised to Be a Major Force in PV?    
    E.2 Opportunities for CIGS Firms    
    E.2.1 CIGS in the Conventional Panel Market    
    E.2.2 BIPV Opportunities for CIGS    
    E.2.3 CIGS Opportunities in Portable Electronics    
    E.3 The Business Case for CIGS in a Technology Agnostic PV Environment    
    E.4 Will There Ever Be High-Volume Printed CIGS?    
    E.5 The CIGS Supply Structure    
    E.5.1 The Death Toll for Start-ups Continues.  Who's left?    
    E.5.2 Transition from Startups to Asian Multinationals    
    E.6 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of CIGS PV  
     
    Chapter One: Introduction    
    1.1 Background to this Report    
    1.1.1 Industry Consolidation and Shake Out.  Are We Done Yet?    
    1.1.2 Enter Fresh Capital:  TSMC and Hanergy.    
    1.1.3 Higher Efficiency and More Flexible Modules: the Path to Market Share for CIGS?    
    1.1.4 CIGS and BIPV: A Match Made for Rooftops?    
    1.1.5 Flexible CIGS' Achilles Heel: Lifetimes and Encapsulation    
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report    
    1.3 Methodology of this Report    
    1.4 Plan of this Report  
     
    Chapter Two: The Supply Side of CIGS PV    
    2.1 Two Keys to Competing with Crystalline Silicon: Higher Yield and Lower Production Costs    
    2.2 The Indium issue: Will there Ever be Price Stability?    
    2.3 Other CIGS-Specific Materials    
    2.3.1 Electrodes: Changing Materials    
    2.3.2 CIGS' Special Encapsulation Needs    
    2.4 CIGS Manufacturing Processes    
    2.4.1 Conventional Vacuum Deposition    
    2.4.2 Electrodeposition    
    2.4.3 Printing: Will it Always be the "Next Big Thing?"    
    2.4.4 Roll-to-Roll: Is It Really an Advantage?    
    2.5 The Changing Capital Landscape for CIGS Development    
    2.6 Key Points Made in this Chapter  
     
    Chapter Three: CIGS Market Opportunities    
    3.1 How does CIGS Gain Market Share in a PV Technology Agnostic World Dominated by Silicon?    
    3.1.1 How Can CIGS Sell Itself?    
    3.2 Flexible CIGS:  A High-Growth Market Where Crystalline Silicon Cannot Compete    
    3.2.1 Flexible BIPV Opportunities    
    3.2.2 Other Flexible Application Opportunities    
    3.2.3 Long-Term Reliability of Flexible CIGS    
    3.3 Conventional Module Market Opportunities    
    3.4 Current Market and Capital Funding Situation    
    3.4.1 The Shift from Small Start-up Companies to Deep Pocketed Corporations    
    3.4.2 The Shift to China and Taiwan    
    3.4.3 Leaders and Strategies    
    3.5 Key Points Made in this Chapter  
     
    Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts for CIGS PV and Its Materials    
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology    
    4.1.1 Data Sources    
    4.1.2 Changes from Previous Reports    
    4.1.3 Scope of the Forecast    
    4.1.4 Alternative Scenarios    
    4.2 Forecasts of CIGS PV by Product Type    
    4.2.1 Conventional Panels    
    4.2.2 BIPV    
    4.2.3 Other Products    
    4.3 Forecasts of CIGS PV by Manufacturing Technology
    4.3.1 Forecasts by Rigid vs. Flexible Manufacturing    
    4.3.2 Forecasts by CIGS Deposition Method    
    4.4 Summary of Forecasts    
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report    
    About the Author    
     
    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit E-1:  Eight-Year Summary Forecast of CIGS PV    
    Exhibit 2-1: Electrodeposited CIGS Firms    
    Exhibit 2-2: Printed CIGS Firms    
    Exhibit 2-3:  Result of 2010-2011 CIGS Funding    
    Exhibit 4-1: Eight-Year Forecast of Conventional CIGS PV Panels   
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $4,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $5,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $6,995.00  
REPORT # SL2014V1V2 PUBLISHED April 25, 2014
Smart Lighting Markets 2014 V1 & V2
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY
    NanoMarkets has been covering the smart lighting market for four years and has acquired an understanding of the key markets, technologies and companies in this rapidly expanding business.  This year, NanoMarkets has decided to cover this interesting sector in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to an analysis of smart lighting markets and covering the basic drivers and economics of the smart lighting business.  Volume II provides coverage of the leading companies, products and technologies that play in the smart lighting market place.
     
    Together both volumes identify where and how the new business for smart lighting systems will appear over the next eight years as the developed world replaces its lighting infrastructure with solid-state lighting (SSL), especially LEDs.
     
    While many smart lighting systems can control compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), there is little doubt that the smart lighting products of the future will primarily intended for LED control.  This is not just because LEDs are the “lighting of the future,” but also because they potentially permit very high levels of control compared with previous generations of lighting.  With this in mind, this report examines how the latest control and sensor technologies will impact the development of future smart lighting products.
     
    Many existing smart lighting systems are intended primarily to add to LEDs’ already impressive energy efficiency.  This makes strategic sense given current concerns about rising real energy prices.  However, NanoMarkets believes that with the market becoming crowded, suppliers of smart lighting systems will need to find new ways to differentiate themselves in the market, either by (1) exploring new end user markets such as street lighting or auto lighting, or (2) adding new functionality such as health and mood lighting or even visible light communications (VLC). The latest lighting research indicates that smart lighting can also lead to improved health and mood, while newer technology is showing the way to using smart lighting systems for air quality monitoring and even the delivery of information services. 
     
    While smart lighting systems have evolved as standalone products, NanoMarkets notes that, in this Internet-of-Things era, the smart lighting business must be seen as part of a bigger picture.  In particular, in this report we discuss the opportunities that are expected to emerge as smart lighting systems increasingly interface with building and home automation products.
     
    In this year’s reports, we have considerably extended the report coverage to include analysis beyond the energy-saving features of smart lighting to other business opportunities that the arrival of smart lighting is creating.  This is – in particular – the focus of Volume I -- But as with NanoMarkets previous report on smart lighting, our 2014 reports show how new value is being created in the lighting market by adding enhanced electronics and intelligent luminaires and how such product strategies will be able to build on the massive trend towards introducing LED lighting. 
     
    Also included in Volume II is an analysis of the smart lighting strategies of the firms that NanoMarkets expects to see as major players in the smart lighting space.  We examine what the prospects for start-ups are in this space.  And in Volume I there is an eight-year market forecast with breakouts by type of product, end user market segment, and the regions/countries where this report will be sold.
     
    Because of our years of coverage in this field, NanoMarkets believes that our 2014 reports provide the best information and analysis available on the current trends in the smart lighting sector.  We include a detailed eight-year forecast with breakouts by functionality and type of end user, as well as analyses of product/market strategies being deployed by leading firms in the smart lighting space.  We believe that these reports will prove of value to executives throughout the lighting, semiconductor, sensor and networking industries.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    VOLUME I:  MARKETS AND DRIVERS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 What has Changed Since NanoMarkets' 2013 Smart Lighting Report
    E.1.1 Progress in LED Deployment
    E.1.2 Smart Lighting Market Evolution
    E.2 Current Challenges in the Smart Lighting Market
    E.3 The Evolving Smart Lighting Supply Chain
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Markets
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    1.4 Drivers for Smart Lighting
    1.4.1 Energy Efficiency:  Policy and Cost Consideration
    1.4.2 How Important Will Mood/Performance Enhancement as a Market Driver for Smart Lighting
    1.4.3 Aesthetic Factors Driving and Retarding the Smart Lighting Market
    1.4.4 Visible Light Communications
    1.5 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two:  Smart Lighting:  Regional and National Markets
    2.1 United States Markets for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.1.1 Regulatory and Building Code Environment:  Impact of LEED, EISA, etc.
    2.1.2 Other Factors Shaping the Market for Smart Lighting Systems in the US
    2.2 Markets for Smart Lighting Systems in Japan
    2.2.1 Smart Lighting Systems and the Success of LEDs in Japan
    2.2.2 Other Factors Shaping the Market for Smart Lighting Systems in Japan
    2.3 Markets for Smart Lighting Systems in China
    2.3.1 Smart Lighting Systems in the Context of the Chinese Industrial Policy
    2.3.2 Other Factors Shaping the Market for Smart Lighting Systems in China
    2.4 Korean Markets for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.4.1 Impact of Korean Government Energy and Industrial Policy
on Smart Lighting Systems Markets
    2.5 European Markets for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.5.1 Impact of Recent Changes in European Energy and Environmental Policy on Smart Lighting Systems
    2.5.2 National Factors
    2.5.3 Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Lighting Systems by Country/Region
     
    Chapter Three: Smart Lighting in Business Establishments
    3.1 Worldwide Office/Industrial Construction Trends:  Impact on the Smart Lighting Market
    3.1.1 Special Considerations for Educational Establishments
    3.1.2 Smart Lighting in Retail Locations
    3.1.3 Healthcare Facilities as a Market for Smart Lighting Systems
    3.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting in Business Establishments
    3.2.1 Eight-Year Forecasts for Office Buildings
    3.2.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Industrial Buildings
    3.2.3 Eight-Year Forecasts for Retail Locations
    3.2.4 Eight-Year Forecasts for Healthcare Facilities
    3.2.5 Eight-Year Forecasts for Educational Establishments
    3.2.6 Eight-Year Forecasts by Region/Country
     
    Chapter Four: Smart Lighting in Residential Markets
    4.1 Residential Buildings as a Market for Smart Lighting:  Current Residential Lighting Systems
    4.1.1 Worldwide Residential Construction Trends:  Impact on the Smart Lighting Market
    4.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Lighting Systems in for Residential Locations
    4.2.1 Eight-Year Forecast by Single-Family/Multi-Tenant
    4.2.2 Eight-Year Forecasts by Region/Country
     
    Chapter Five: Smart Lighting in Other Markets 
    5.1 Outdoor Lighting
    5.1.1 Smart Street Lighting
    5.1.2 Other Smart Outdoor Lighting
    5.1.3 Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Lighting Systems for Outdoor Locations
    5.2 Automotive Applications for Smart Lighting
    5.2.1 Specialized Smart Lighting Products for Automobiles
    5.2.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Lighting Systems for Automotive Applications
    5.3 Smart Lighting in Horticulture and Urban Farms
    5.3.1 Specialized Smart Lighting Products for Horticulture and Urban Farms
    5.3.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Lighting Systems for Horticulture and Urban Farms
     
    Chapter Six: Summary of Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Lighting Systems Markets
    6.1 Eight-Year Forecasts by Application
    6.2 Eight-Year Forecast by Type of System
    6.3 Eight-Year Forecast by New Build or Retrofit
    6.4 Eight-Year Forecast by Region/Country
     

    VOLUME II:  PRODUCTS, COMPANIES AND TECHNOLOGIES

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Markets
    E.2 Emerging Opportunities in Smart Lighting
    E.2.1 Lighting Industry
    E.2.2 Electronics and Semiconductor Industries
    E.2.3 Networking and Building Automation Opportunities
    E.3 Current Challenges in the Smart Lighting Business
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Smart Lighting System Product and Technology Evolution
    2.1 Smart Ballasts and Beyond
    2.2 Sensor Technology Developments Impacting Smart Lighting
    2.2.1 Occupancy Sensing
    2.2.2 Daylight Sensing
    2.3 Smart Lighting Controllers
    2.3.1 Evolution of Controller Technology Innovations Impacting Smart Lighting
    2.3.2 Current and Future Types of Controllers for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.4 Smart Health and Mood Lighting
    2.4.1 Color Tuning and the Need for Dynamic Mood and Health Lighting
    2.4.2 Visible Light Communications
    2.5 Chips:  LED Drivers for Smart Lighting
    2.6 Smart Lighting Systems Software
    2.7 Networking and Interface Evolution for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.7.1 Internet Gateways for Smart Lighting
    2.7.2 Specialized Protocols:  DALI, BACnet, KNX, LonWorks and Jennet
    2.7.3 Interfaces to Building Automation Systems
    2.7.4 Ethernet Connectivity for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.7.5 Wireless Connectivity for Smart Lighting Systems:  ZigBee, EnOcean, WiFi and Bluetooth
    2.8 Smart Lighting in the Context of the Internet-of-Things
    2.8.1 IPv6 for Smart Lighting Systems
    2.9 Smart Lighting, Smart Grids and Smart Windows
     
    Chapter Three:  Profiles of Major Smart Lighting Firms
    3.1 Acuity Brands/Adura
    3.2 CommScope/Redwood Systems
    3.3 Control4
    3.4 Cooper Lighting/Eaton
    3.5 Daintree Networks
    3.6 Digital Lumens
    3.7 Echoflex Solutions
    3.8 Energy Automation Systems
    3.9 Enlighted
    3.10 Fulham
    3.11 GE
    3.12 Greenwave Reality
    3.13Honeywell
    3.14 Leviton
    3.15 Lumetric Lighting
    3.16 Lutron
    3.17 Osram
    3.18 Philips
    3.19 Streetlight.Vision
    3.20 Tvilight
    3.21 Universal Lighting
    3.22 Zumbotel
     
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-715 PUBLISHED April 25, 2014
Smart Lighting Markets-2014; V2. Products, Companies and Technologies
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY
    NanoMarkets has been covering the smart lighting market for four years and has acquired an understanding of the key markets, technologies and companies in this rapidly expanding business.  This year, NanoMarkets has decided to cover this interesting sector in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to an analysis of smart lighting markets and covering the basic drivers and economics of the smart lighting business.  Volume II provides coverage of the leading companies, products and technologies that play in the smart lighting market place.
     
    Together both volumes identify where and how the new business for smart lighting systems will appear over the next eight years as the developed world replaces its lighting infrastructure with solid-state lighting (SSL), especially LEDs.
     
    While many smart lighting systems can control compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), there is little doubt that the smart lighting products of the future will primarily intended for LED control.  This is not just because LEDs are the “lighting of the future,” but also because they potentially permit very high levels of control compared with previous generations of lighting.  With this in mind, this report examines how the latest control and sensor technologies will impact the development of future smart lighting products.
     
    Many existing smart lighting systems are intended primarily to add to LEDs’ already impressive energy efficiency.  This makes strategic sense given current concerns about rising real energy prices.  However, NanoMarkets believes that with the market becoming crowded, suppliers of smart lighting systems will need to find new ways to differentiate themselves in the market, either by (1) exploring new end user markets such as street lighting or auto lighting, or (2) adding new functionality such as health and mood lighting or even visible light communications (VLC). The latest lighting research indicates that smart lighting can also lead to improved health and mood, while newer technology is showing the way to using smart lighting systems for air quality monitoring and even the delivery of information services. 
     
    While smart lighting systems have evolved as standalone products, NanoMarkets notes that, in this Internet-of-Things era, the smart lighting business must be seen as part of a bigger picture.  In particular, in this report we discuss the opportunities that are expected to emerge as smart lighting systems increasingly interface with building and home automation products.
     
    In this year’s reports, we have considerably extended the report coverage to include analysis beyond the energy-saving features of smart lighting to other business opportunities that the arrival of smart lighting is creating.  This is – in particular – the focus of Volume I -- But as with NanoMarkets previous report on smart lighting, our 2014 reports show how new value is being created in the lighting market by adding enhanced electronics and intelligent luminaires and how such product strategies will be able to build on the massive trend towards introducing LED lighting. 
     
    Also included in Volume II is an analysis of the smart lighting strategies of the firms that NanoMarkets expects to see as major players in the smart lighting space.  We examine what the prospects for start-ups are in this space.  And in Volume I there is an eight-year market forecast with breakouts by type of product, end user market segment, and the regions/countries where this report will be sold.
     
    Because of our years of coverage in this field, NanoMarkets believes that our 2014 reports provide the best information and analysis available on the current trends in the smart lighting sector.  We include a detailed eight-year forecast with breakouts by functionality and type of end user, as well as analyses of product/market strategies being deployed by leading firms in the smart lighting space.  We believe that these reports will prove of value to executives throughout the lighting, semiconductor, sensor and networking industries.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary    
    E.1 Emerging Opportunities in Smart Lighting    
    E.1.1 The Traditional Lighting Industry and the Smart Lighting Industry    
    E.1.2 The Need for Business Ecosystems for Smart Lighting    
    E.1.3 Smart Mood Lighting:  Next or Never    
    E.1.4 Smart Lighting from the Semiconductor Industry Perspective    
    E.1.5 Networking and Building Automation Opportunities    
    E.2 Current Challenges in the Smart Lighting Business    
    E.2.1 Interoperability    
    E.2.2 Up-Front System Cost    
    E.3 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Markets    
     
    Chapter One: Introduction    
    1.1 Background to this Report    
    1.1.1 LED Adoption Driving Changes in Smart Lighting    
    1.1.2 New Regulations and Guidelines Affect Lighting    
    1.1.3 Evolving Market Strategies in the Smart Lighting Space    
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report    
    1.3 Methodology of this Report    
    1.4 Plan of this Report  
     
    Chapter Two: Smart Lighting System Product and Technology Evolution    
    2.1 Smart Ballasts and Beyond    
    2.2 Sensor Technology Developments Impacting Smart Lighting    
    2.2.1 Occupancy Sensing    
    2.2.2 Daylight Sensing    
    2.3 Smart Health and Mood Lighting    
    2.3.1 Color Tuning and the Need for Dynamic Mood and Health Lighting     
    2.3.2 Concerns About Safety and Implementation    
    2.4 Visible Light Communications    
    2.5 Smart Lighting Controllers    
    2.5.1 Evolution of Controller Technology Innovations Impacting Smart Lighting    
    2.5.2 Current and Future Types of Controllers for Smart Lighting Systems    
    2.6 Chips: LED Drivers for Smart Lighting    
    2.6.1 Improved Dimming and Color Control    
    2.6.2 Chips to Add Touch Functionality    
    2.7 Smart Lighting Systems Software     
    2.7.1 Features of Smart Lighting Software in Buildings    
    2.7.2 Software for Outdoor Lighting    
    2.7.3 Luminaire-level Control    
    2.8 Networking and Interface Evolution for Smart Lighting Systems    
    2.8.1 Internet Gateways for Smart Lighting    
    2.8.2 Protocols for Wired Systems    
    2.8.3 Interfaces to Building Automation Systems    
    2.8.4 Ethernet Connectivity for Smart Lighting Systems    
    2.8.5 Wireless Connectivity for Smart Lighting Systems    
    2.9 Smart Lighting in the Context of the Internet-of-Things    
    2.9.1 IPv6 for Smart Lighting Systems    
    2.10 Smart Lighting and Smart Grids:  Demand Response    
    2.11 Smart Lighting and Smart Windows    
    2.12 Key Points from this Chapter  
     
    Chapter Three: Profiles of Smart Lighting Companies and Related Firms    
    3.1 Large Lighting Companies    
    3.1.1 Acuity Brands (U.S.)    
    3.1.2 GE (U.S.)    
    3.1.3 Osram (Germany)    
    3.1.4 Philips (Netherlands)    
    3.1.5 Zumtobel Group (Austria)    
    3.2 Lighting Control Systems Firms    
    3.2.1 CommScope/Redwood Systems (U.S.)    
    3.2.2 Control4 (U.S.)    
    3.2.3 Daintree Networks (U.S.)    
    3.2.4 Digital Lumens (U.S.)    
    3.2.5 Enlighted (U.S.)    
    3.2.6 GreenWave Reality (U.S.)    
    3.2.7 Lutron (U.S.)    
    3.2.8 Streetlight.Vision    
    3.3 Building Automation Manufacturers    
    3.3.1 Honeywell
    3.3.2 Johnson Controls    
    3.3.3 Trane    
    3.4 LED Chip Makers    
    3.4.1 Marvell    
    3.4.2 NXP Semiconductors    
    3.4.3 STMicroelectronics (Switzerland)    
    3.4.4 Other Chip Makers    
    3.5 University-Based Lighting Centers    
    3.5.1 California Lighting Technology Center    
    3.5.2 Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center    
    3.6 Key Points from This Chapter    
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report    
    About the Authors 
       
    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit E-1:  Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Revenues by Application
    ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 3-1: Members of Connected Lighting Alliance    
    Exhibit 3-2: Semiconductor Companies Involved in Smart Lighting    
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-711 PUBLISHED April 08, 2014
Smart Windows Markets: 2014-2021
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY
    NanoMarkets has now been tracking the smart windows for five years and has produced detailed studies of this market and related businesses including the smart windows materials markets and smart auto glass. Our understanding of new high-tech glass markets has been further enhanced by our studies of BIPV glass, self-healing and self-cleaning glass and various segments of the display glass sector.
     
    As part of our ongoing coverage of the smart windows sector, NanoMarkets has compiled numerous market forecasts in this space for the buildings/construction and aerospace sectors, with breakouts by type of smart windows technology and geographical region served.
     
    In this report, we present a compendium of our eight-year projections in both volume (square meters) and value ($ millions) terms.  We have updated our forecasts from 2013, both adjusting our numbers for current conditions in the smart windows business and bringing our forecasts up to date with numbers for 2021.
     
    As part of the overall analysis, this report also examines the cost and technical challenges that will have to be overcome for the smart windows markets to make new products a success.  In addition, this report also develops a roadmap for the next-generation smart windows technologies, especially with regard to more effective self-dimming and self-cleaning glass, as well as hybrid smart windows/BIPV glass.
     
    NanoMarkets believes that this report will provide guidance to all those interested in the business prospects for smart windows and the technologies that make them possible. NanoMarkets believes that those who will benefit from purchasing this study will include marketing and business development executives in the glazing, coatings, construction, automotive and aerospace industries.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Prospects for Passive Tinting Materials:  Are There Any?
    E.1.1 Passive Retrofit Window Films:  Still the One to Beat
    E.1.2 Passive Thermochromic Windows
    E.1.3 Passive Photochromic Windows
    E.2 Active Smart Windows:  The Future?
    E.2.1 Electrochromic Active Smart Windows
    E.2.2 SPD Active Smart Windows
    E.2.3 PDLC Privacy Windows
    E.3 Thoughts on the Opportunities with Self-Cleaning and Self-Healing Windows
    E.4 Opportunities for Construction and Architectural Firms
    E.5 Opportunities for Transportation Equipment Manufacturers
    E.5.1 Automotive Industry:  Style and Substance
    E.5.2 Aerospace Industry:  A Place to Start With New Windows Ideas
    E.6 Opportunities for Materials Firms
    E.6.1 Glass and Windows Firms
    E.6.2 Coatings and Films Companies
    E.7 Six Firms to Watch in the Smart Windows Space
    E.8 Regions and Countries to Watch
    E.8.1 U.S. – Construction Boom, Bust or What?
    E.8.2 Europe—the Environmentalism on the Wane
    E.8.3 China and Non-Japan Asia—Growth
with Caution
    E.8.4 Japan:  Construction and Alternative Energy Doing Well
    E.9 Summary of the Eight-Year Forecasts for the Smart Windows Market
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Passive Smart Window Products And Technologies
    2.1 Smart Windows:  Passive versus Active
    2.2 Passive Retrofit Window Films
    2.3 Key Technology Developments and Suppliers
    2.3.1 Thermochromics
    2.3.2 Photochromics
    2.4 Customers Base for Passive Smart Windows in the Construction Industry
    2.5 Customers Base for Passive Smart Windows in Automotive and Aerospace
    2.6 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three:  Active Smart Window Products and Technologies
    3.1 Key Technology Developments and Suppliers
    3.1.1 Electrochromics
    3.1.2 SPD
    3.1.3 PDLC Privacy Glass
    3.2 Customers Base for Passive Smart Windows in the Construction Industry
    3.3 Customers Base for Passive Smart Windows in Automotive and Aerospace
    3.4 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four:  Smart Building Windows:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology and Data Sources
    4.2 Rising Real Energy Prices Driving Smart Windows
    4.1.2 LEED and Zero Net Energy Buildings
    4.3 Residential, Commercial and Industrial Construction Trends
    4.4 Comfort and Style Factors Driving Smart Building Windows
    4.5 The Smart Building Windows Supply Chain
    4.5.1 Retail and Wholesalers
    4.5.2 Materials Suppliers and Other Market Influencers
    4.6 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for Residential Buildings
    4.6.1 Eight-Year Forecast of Residential Smart Windows Markets:  TAM
    4.6.2 Eight-Year Passive Residential Smart Windows Forecast: By Technology/Building Type
    4.6.3 Eight-Year Active Residential Smart Windows Forecast: By Technology/Building Type
    4.6.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Residential Smart Windows Market by Major Geographical Regions
    4.7 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for Commercial and Industrial Buildings
    4.7.1 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for Commercial, and Industrial Buildings:  TAM
    4.7.2 Eight-Year Passive Commercial/Industrial Smart Windows Forecast: By Technology/Building Type
    4.7.3 Eight-Year Active Commercial/Industrial Smart Windows Forecast: By Technology/Building Type
    4.7.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Commercial/Industrial Smart Windows Market by Major Geographical Regions
    4.8 Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Mirrors
    4.9 New Products:  Self-Cleaning, Self-Healing Windows and “Smart BIPV”
    4.10 Alternative Scenarios
    4.11 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Five:  Automotive and Aerospace Markets For Smart Windows:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    5.1 Energy Conservation as a Market Driver for Smart Windows in Transportation
    5.2 Smart Windows, Comfort and Style in Transportation
    5.2.1 Automotive
    5.2.1 Aerospace
    5.3 The Smart Windows Supply Chain for Transportation
    5.3.1 Automotive Retailers
    5.3.2 The Aerospace Components Supply Chain
    5.4 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for the Automotive Segment
    5.4.1 Eight-Year Forecast of Automotive Smart Windows Markets:  TAM
    5.4.2 Eight-Year Passive Smart Auto Windows Forecast: By Technology/Vehicle Type
    5.4.3 Eight-Year Active Smart Windows Forecast: By Technology/Vehicle Type
    5.4.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Auto Windows Market by Major Geographical Regions
    5.5 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for the Aerospace Sector
    5.5.1 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for Aerospace:  TAM
    5.5.2 Eight-Year Passive Aerospace Smart Windows Forecast: By Technology
    5.5.3 Eight-Year Active Commercial/Industrial Smart Windows Forecast: By Technology Type
    5.5.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Aerospace Windows Market by Major Geographical Regions
    5.6 New Products:  Self-Cleaning, Self-Healing Windows, “Smart BIPV” and HUDs for the transportation sector
    5.7 Alternative Scenarios
    5.8 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Six:  Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts
    6.1 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Windows by End User Markets
    6.2 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Windows by Passive Technologies
    6.3 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Windows by Active Technologies
    6.4 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Windows by Geographical Region
     
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-701 PUBLISHED April 01, 2014
Nanosensor Markets—2014
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Emerging Electronics
  • SUMMARY

    Nanosensors -- devices capable of detecting nanoparticles -- are already in use in the medical diagnosis field, but are expected to see near-term commercialization in military, domestic security and environmental monitoring applications, as well as several other areas. NanoMarkets believes that longer-term revenue generation from nanosensors will also emerge from a variety of uses for such sensors in microelectronics manufacturing and in the construction market.  In addition, we also believe that the near-term development of nanosensors will be an important enabling technology for the “Internet-of-Things” and robotics.

    This report identifies where and how the commercial opportunities presented by nanosensors will appear and provides detailed projections of the size of these opportunities over the coming eight years.  Each nanosensor application is analyzed in detail, showing how it will be brought to market.  The report also discusses the strategies being deployed by nanosensor firms and also provides an overview of noteworthy nanosensor commercialization initiatives.

    In addition, to being a valuable guide for marketing and product management in the sensor industry, this report will also be required reading for executives in the specialty chemical industry, since it discusses how specific biological and nanomaterials will be used in nanosensors. Coverage of materials includes biological materials and inorganic nanomaterials including graphene and quantum dots.  This report also analyzes the business implications notable trends in the fabrication of nanosensors including developments in bottom-up assembly, self-assembly and top-down lithography.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Opportunity analysis for nanosensors
    E.1.1 Opportunities for the sensor industry
    E.1.2 Opportunities for the specialty chemical industry
    E.2 Eight firms to watch in the nanosensor business
    E.3 Regulatory factors impacting the nanosensor market
    E.4 Summary of eight-year forecasts for nanosensors
    E.5 Alternative scenarios
     
    Chapter 1: Introduction
    Background to this report
    1.2 Objective and scope of this report
    1.3 Methodology for this report
    1.3.1 Forecasting methodology
    1.4 Plan of this report
     
    Chapter 2: Commercial Trends in Nanosensors
    2.1 Generic advantages and disadvantages of nanotechnology in sensing applications
    2.2 Critical materials trends for nanosensors
    2.2.1 Biological materials
    2.2.2 Chemicals
    2.2.3 Mechanical devices
    2.2.4 Electrical and electronic devices
    2.2.5 Opportunities for quantum dots in nanosensors
    2.2.6 A future role for graphene in nanosensors?
    2.2.7 Moving from spherical nanomaterials to wires, cylinders and tubes
    2.3 Solar-powered nanosensing
    2.4 Notable trends in the fabrication of nanosensors
    2.4.1 Top-down lithography
    2.4.2 Bottom up assembly
    2.4.3 Self-assembly
    2.4.4 Reliability issues with nanosensors
    2.5 Noteworthy nanosensor commercialization initiatives
    2.6 Key points from this chapter
     
    Chapter 3: Current Applications and Futuristic Opportunities
    3.1 Security, surveillance and military applications
    3.1.1 Identification of hazardous explosives - chemicals and gases
    3.1.2 Detection of biological weapons 
    3.1.3 Fiber optic “nano-cameras”
    3.1.4 Eight-year forecasts of nanosensors for security, surveillance and military applications
    3.2 Biomedical and healthcare applications
    3.2.1 Monitoring of blood sugar for diabetics
    3.2.2 Total blood testing
    3.2.3 Detection of genetic defects
    3.2.4 Cancer detection
    3.2.5 Nanosensors and therapeutics
    3.2.6 A convergence of the macro and nano world: labs-on-a-chip
    3.2.7 Eight-year forecasts of nanosensors for biomedical and healthcare applications
    3.3 Environmental monitoring applications
    3.3.1 Pollution particulate matter
    3.3.2 Pesticides and organophosphates
    3.3.3 Eight-year forecasts of nanosensors for environmental monitoring applications
    3.4 Food management
    3.4.1 Beverage Industry
    3.4.2 Detection of harmful pathogens
    3.4.3 Eight-year forecasts of nanosensors for food management applications
    3.5 Other applications for nanosensors
    3.5.1 Transportation
    3.5.2 Construction
    3.5.3 Energy storage
    3.5.4 Nanoelectronics and plasmonics
    3.5.5 Nanosensors for mass and pressure measurement
    3.5.6 Eight-year forecasts of nanosensors for food management applications
    3.6 Nanosensors, robotics and the Internet-of-Things
    3.7 Summary of eight-year forecasts for nanosensors
    3.8 Key points of the chapter
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-707 PUBLISHED March 20, 2014
BIPV Glass Markets-2014 & Beyond
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY

    NanoMarkets latest report on BIPV glass analyzes future scenarios for BIPV.  It includes a detailed eight-year market forecast with breakouts by type of building and PV technology and in both volume and value terms.  We also discuss the BIPV glass strategies of leading glass and PV firms as well the community of firms whose core business is developing and installing BIPV glass.  

    One possible road to a larger addressable market for BIPV glass will be to use solution-processed PV layers and here we note that both Pilkington and AGC are already actively involved in joint development projects that could do just that.  With this in mind, our report examines how the economics of BIPV glass will evolve based on c-Si, thin-film, and DSC/OPV materials

    This report also discusses how BIPV glass can better be sold to architects, who are sometimes skeptical of the BIPV glass concept, but remain the key decision makers on the demand side. In part this is about improved marketing.  But as we discuss in this report, it is also a matter of playing up the aesthetic advantage of solar glass (for example with tinted and colored products) and by incorporating additional smart features such as hybrid light/photovoltaic capability.

    This report is based around NanoMarkets ongoing program of publishing industry analyses of various segments of the BIPV market, an area in which we have been involved for five years.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary   
    E.1 Changes in Market Conditions for BIPV Glass since our Previous Report   
    E.1.1 Impact of the Solar Revival   
    E.1.2 Changing PV Material Mix   
    E.1.3 Are the Big Glass and Panel Firms Still Interested in BIPV Glass?   
    E.1.4 Current State of Green Building Sector as it Impacts BIPV Glass   
    E.1.5 The Changing Supply Chain for BIPV Glass: Distribution and Retail   
    E.2 Opportunity Analysis and Roadmap by Type of BIPV Glass Product   
    E.2.1 Skylights   
    E.2.2 Building Facades and Curtain Walls   
    E.2.3 Atrium Glass, Canopies and Pergolas   
    E.2.4 Windows   
    E.3 Companies to Watch in the BIPV Glass Market   
    E.4 Opportunity Analysis by Country/Region   
    E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for BIPV Glass   

    Chapter One: Introduction   
    1.1 Background to this Report   
    1.1.1 Cost Strategies for BIPV Glass:  Design and Technology Strategies   
    1.1.2 Color and Lack of It as a Way to Differentiate BIPV Glass   
    1.2 Objective and Scope of This Report   
    1.3 Methodology of the Report   
    1.4 Plan of this Report   

    Chapter Two: BIPV Glass: Likely Technology and Product Evolution   
    2.1 Why BIPV Glass Will Take Business from BAPV in the Coming Decade   
    2.2 Factors on Which BIPV Glass Can Effectively Compete With BAPV   
    2.2.1 Visually Aesthetic Solutions are Making BIPV Glass a More Attractive Solution   
    2.2.2 BIPV Glass May Offer Lower Costs than BAPV in the Future   
    2.2.3 Transparency of BIPV Needs to Improve for BIPV Glass to Take off Commercially   
    2.2.4 Energy Conversion Efficiency an Issue with BIPV Glass   
    2.3 Crystalline Silicon Products Will Dominate the BIPV Glass Market   
    2.3.1 Transparent c-Si May Become Possible   
    2.3.2 General Improvements in c-Si Technology will Help BIPV Glass, Too   
    2.3.3 Limitations of Crystalline Silicon for Use in BIPV Glass   
    2.4 Other Solar Materials Options for BIPV Glass:  A Future Beyond c-Si   
    2.5 Current and Future use of CIGS in BIPV Glass   
    2.5.1 Key CIGS Companies of Interest in the Context of BIPV Glass   
    2.6 Current and Future use of CdTe in BIPV Glass   
    2.6.1 Potential for Using CdTe in BIPV Glass   
    2.7 Is there a Future for OPV and DSC in BIPV Glass?   
    2.7.1 DSC and BIPV Glass   
    2.7.2 OPV and BIPV Glass   
    2.8 A Note on Amorphous Silicon   
    2.9 Novel Research Directions for BIPV Glass:  Towards Monolithic Integration   
    2.9.1 Stick-on TFPV   
    2.9.2 Spray-on TFPV   
    2.9.3 Laser Transfer Printing   
    2.9.4  New Solar Materials   
    2.10 BIPV Integrated Into Smart Glass   
    2.11 Changes in the Supply Chain Remain Vital to the Success of BIPV Glass   
    2.11.1 Value Creation at Local Suppliers and Integrators   
    2.11.2 Further Thoughts on Onsite Integration   
    2.12 Aesthetics, Architects and BIPV Glass   
    2.13Notes on Retrofits   
    2.14 Encapsulation Issues for BIPV glass   
    2.15 Ongoing Challenges for BIPV Glass   
    2.16 Key Points Made in this Chapter   

    Chapter Three: Critical Markets for BIPV Glass   
    3.1 Factors Impacting Status of BIPV Glass   
    3.1.1 Cost Factors:  BIPV Glass is Still Costly   
    3.1.2 BIPV Glass and Zero-Energy Buildings:  A Natural Fit?   
    3.1.3 Design Considerations in Market Growth for BIPV Glass   
    3.1.4 Testing Requirements and Lack of Standardization   
    3.1.5 Need for Deeper Understanding of BIPV Glass in the Architectural and Other Communities   
    3.2 Specialized BIPV Subsidies   
    3.2.1 China   
    3.2.2 United States   
    3.2.3 Europe   
    3.2.4 Japan   
    3.3 BIPV Glass in Skylights, Facades, Atriums and Canopies   
    3.3.1 BIPV Glass in Skylights   
    3.3.2 BIPV Glass in Facades and Atria   
    3.4 Prestige Commercial, Government and Multi-tenant Residential Buildings   
    3.4.1 New Prestige Buildings Using BIPV Glass Built in 2013 and 2014   
    3.4.2 What Do Recent Trends in Prestige Buildings Using BIPV Glass Show?   
    3.5 BIPV Glass in Other Commercial and Government Buildings   
    3.5.1 Why BIPV Glass is Being Used in Smaller Commercial and Government Buildings?   
    3.5.2 What Needs to Happen to Boost BIPV Glass Penetration in Conventional Commercial Buildings   
    3.6 BIPV Glass in Residential Buildings   
    3.7 A Note on BIPV Glass in Industrial Buildings   
    3.8 BIPV Glass Markets by Regions:   
    3.8.1 USA   
    3.8.2 Europe   
    3.8.3 Japan   
    3.8.4 China   
    3.9 Key Points Made in the Chapter: 

    Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts of BIPV Glass   
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology   
    4.1.1 Impact of the Solar Bubble on the BIPV Market   
    4.1.2 General Forecasting Framework   
    4.1.3 Macroeconomic and Regulatory Assumptions   
    4.1.4 Sources of Information   
    4.1.5 Pricing and Other Assumptions   
    4.2 Eight-Year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type of Building   
    4.2.1 Overall Addressable Market   
    4.2.2 Overall Addressable Market for Building Glass   
    4.2.3 Penetration of Building Glass Market by BIPV Glass   
    4.3 Eight-Year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Area and MW Shipped   
    4.3.1 Eight-Year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Area Shipped By Type of Buildings   
    4.3.2 Eight-Year Forecast of BIPV Glass by MW Shipped By Type of Buildings   
    4.4 Eight-Year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Value ($ Millions)   
    4.4.1 Pricing Forecasts for BIPV by Type of PV Material   
    4.4.2 Eight-Year Forecasts by Type of Building   
    4.5 Eight-Year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type of Product   
    4.5.1 Eight-Year Revenue Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type of Product   
    4.5.2 Eight-Year Area and MW Forecast by Type of Product   
    4.6 Eight-Year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type of Solar Material   
    4.7 Eight-Year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Country Region   
    4.8 Alternative Scenarios   
    4.8.1 Global or Regional Recessions   
    4.8.2 Government Subsidies   
    4.8.3 Technological Breakthroughs   
    4.8.4 Rapid Introduction of Off-the-Shelf BIPV Glass Products   
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report   
    About the Author   

    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit E-1: Firms to Watch for In BIPV Glass Development   
    Exhibit E-2: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type of Building ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 2-1: Roadmap of Product Evolution from BAPV to BIPV   
    Exhibit 2-2: Advantages and Limitations of c-Si for BIPV glass   
    Exhibit 2-3: Key BIPV Glass Technologies   
    Exhibit 3-1: BIPV Subsidies and Their Impact   
    Exhibit 3-2: BIPV glass in Various Applications and its Opportunities   
    Exhibit 3-3: Expected Future Trends for BIPV glass in China   
    Exhibit 4-1: Eight-Year Forecast of Worldwide Construction by Type of Building   
    Exhibit 4-2: Eight-Year Forecast of Worldwide  Construction Glass by Type of Building   
    Exhibit 4-3: Penetration of BIPV glass (%)  
    Exhibit 4-4: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Area Shipped (Million sq. meter)   
    Exhibit 4-5:  Eight-Year Forecast of Efficiency of PV Panels   
    Exhibit 4-6: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by MW Shipped (MW)   
    Exhibit 4-7: Average Cost Per Watt by Type of PV Materials ($)   
    Exhibit 4-8: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type of Building ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 4-9: Type of products share in MW (%)   
    Exhibit 4-10: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type of Product   ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 4-11: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Area Shipped (Million sq. meter)   
    Exhibit 4-12: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by MW Shipped (MW)   
    Exhibit 4-13: Technology/Material share in MW (%)   
    Exhibit 4-14: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by MW Shipped (MWs)   
    Exhibit 4-15: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type of Material ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 4-16: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Area Shipped (Million sq. meter)   
    Exhibit 4-17: Country/Region Share in MW (%)   
    Exhibit 4-18: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Country/Region ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 4-19: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by MW Shipped (MW)   
    Exhibit 4-20: Eight-year Forecast of BIPV Glass by Area Shipped (Million sq. meter)   

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-709 PUBLISHED March 17, 2014
Flexible Glass Markets, 2014 and Beyond
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    Flexible glass as originally promoted seemed to be a miracle material; one that combined the virtues of glass and the virtues of plastic.  However, during 2013, flexible glass seems to have stumbled. Ambitious talk of millions of flexible mobile displays based on flexible glass substrates and cover glass have given way to more restrained projections in which initial uses for flexible glass are more niche-like; batteries, capacitors and sensors, for example. Corning’s recent announcement of shaped Gorilla Glass, seems a recognition that the cover glass requirements for next-generation displays may be more curved than flexible.

    This report provides a market assessment and eight-year forecast of flexible glass, given the new business environment in which flexible glass providers find themselves.  The report examines (1) the traditional markets into which flexible glass was supposed to be sold and when they might become a reality and (2) the revenue potential for flexible glass in some of the newer applications for which it is now being proposed. 

    In addition to the likely trends in applications, this report also discusses the product strategies of the leading glass companies offering flexible glass and also includes detailed eight-year forecasts of flexible glass with breakouts by applications.  The report is the third dedicated analysis from NanoMarkets and updates previously issued reports and forecasts.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary    
    E.1 Flexible Glass Loses its Shine    
    E.1.1 Corning Deemphasizes “Willow”    
    E.1.2 Other Strategies in the Flexible Glass Market    
    E.2 Shifts in End Applications    
    E.2.1 Apple Rumors Affect the Flexible Glass Market    
    E.2.2 Heading Away from Displays: Emerging Applications for Flexible Glass    
    E.2.3 When Will the Mainstream Cell Phone and Tablet Market Need Flexible Glass?    
    E.3 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for Flexible Glass    

    Chapter One: Introduction  
    1.1 What’s New Since NanoMarkets' Previous Report on Flexible Glass?    
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report    
    1.3 Methodology of this Report    
    1.4 Plan of this Report  
     
    Chapter Two:  Alternative Applications 
    2.1 Displays No Longer Leading the Way    
    2.1.1 Mobile Displays    
    2.1.2 What’s Wrong with Flexible Glass    
    2.1.3 The Future of Flexible Glass in the Display Sector    
    2.2 Semiconductor Packaging – A Long Shot or a Good Idea?    
    2.2.1 Interposers Today    
    2.2.2 The Role of Glass in Interposers    
    2.2.3 Groups Working with Thin Glass Interposers    
    2.2.4 The Future of Thin Glass Interposers    
    2.3 Smaller Glass: Batteries and Supercapacitors    
    2.3.1 Target Markets for Flexible Glass    
    2.3.2 What Good Is Flexible Glass in the Battery/Supercap Segment?    
    2.3.3 The Future of Flexible Glass in the Battery/Supercap Segment    
    2.4 Larger Glass: OLED Lighting and Solar Panels    
    2.4.1 Prospects for Flexible Glass in OLED Lighting
    2.4.2 Flexible Glass in PV:  Does It Stand A Chance?    
    2.5 What Application Will be Just Right?    
    2.6 Key Points from This Chapter  
     
    Chapter Three:  Suppliers Adapt to the Changing Fortunes of Flexible Glass    
    3.1 Challenges to the Adoption of Flexible Glass    
    3.1.1 The High-Cost of Flexible Glass    
    3.1.2 Flexible Glass:  Performance Today    
    3.1.3 Manufacturing Infrastructure for Flexible Glass    
    3.1.4 Materials Competition for Flexible Glass    
    3.2 Corning Changes Its Tune    
    3.2.1 History and Retreat    
    3.2.2 Willow:  The Future    
    3.3 Schott Looks to the Future    
    3.3.1 Production Quantities Today    
    3.3.2 Schott’s Thin Glass Applications Development    
    3.3.3 Manufacturing Strategies for Thin Glass at Schott    
    3.4 Asahi Glass Company (AGC) Takes a Different Approach    
    3.4.1 Thin Glass Product Strategies at AGC    
    3.4.2 Manufacturing and Applications Strategies:    
    3.5 Nippon Electric Glass Focuses on Coatings    
    3.5.1 NEG Flexible Glass Product Strategy    
    3.5.2 Possible Applications for Ultrathin Glass    
    3.6 Key Points from This Chapter 
       
    Chapter Four:  Eight-Year Forecasts for Flexible Glass    
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology    
    4.1.1 Addressable Markets for Flexible Glass    
    4.1.2 Penetration Rates for Flexible Glass    
    4.1.3 Sources of Data    
    4.1.4 Pricing Assumptions for Flexible Glass    
    4.1.5 General Economic and Technology Assumptions    
    4.1.6 Assumptions About Encapsulation    
    4.2 Eight-Year Forecast of Flexible Glass In Displays    
    4.2.1 Flexible Glass for Cell Phones    
    4.2.2 Flexible Glass for Other Computer Displays–Including Tablets    
    4.2.3 Flexible Glass for OLED versus LCD Displays    
    4.3 Eight-Year Forecast of Flexible Glass In OLED Lighting    
    4.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Flexible Glass In Solar Panels    
    4.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Flexible Glass In Batteries and Capacitors    
    4.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Flexible Glass In Semiconductor Interposers    
    4.7 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Flexible Glass    
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report    
    About the Authors 
       
    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Potential Value of Flexible Glass in Cell Phones and Tablets    
    Exhibit E-2: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Flexible Glass ($Millions)    
    Exhibit 2-1: Comparison of Silicon and Glass as Interposers    
    Exhibit 2-2: Moisture Sensitivity of Various PV Technologies    
    Exhibit 2-3: Analysis of Market Opportunities for Flexible Glass    
    Exhibit 4-1: Market for Flexible Glass in Cell Phones:  2014-2021    
    Exhibit 4-2: Market for Flexible Glass in Computer Displays:  2014-2021 (Tablets, Laptops, Notebooks, Monitors)    
    Exhibit 4-3: Market for Flexible Glass in Displays:  Summary ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 4-4: Market for Flexible Glass in OLED Lighting: 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 4-5: Market for Flexible Glass in PV: 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 4-6: Market for Flexible Glass for Battery and Capacitor Applications: 2014-2021    
    Exhibit 4-7: Market for Flexible Glass as Interposers: 2014-2021
    Exhibit 4-8: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Flexible Glass ($Millions)
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-685 PUBLISHED March 05, 2014
Smart Glass Opportunities in the Automotive Industry—2014
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the worldwide market for smart glass used in cars and trucks identifying the main opportunities that smart glass presents for glass and coatings makers as well as for the car firms themselves.  In addition, the report includes an eight-year (volume and value) forecast of smart auto glass with breakouts by materials technology and functionality.

    The report incorporates a technology assessment of the latest smart glass technologies for the automotive sector including self-tinting glass, self-cleaning glass, self-healing glass, and automotive display glass.  Applications covered are windshields, mirrors, sunroofs, other automotive windows and dashboards.  The report also discusses the glass-related opportunities that NanoMarkets sees emerging as the result of the latest trends in automotive infotainment systems. 

    This report pinpoints the main trends that will shape the revenue potential of smart auto glass in the next decade.  Noting that many of the smart glass technologies used in cars and trucks have low performance and short lifetimes, this report analyzes how performance will be improved and how this can lead to enhanced revenue streams for the firms involved with smart auto glass, both as technology providers and as OEMs.

    Finally, the report also discusses smart glass adoption strategies by the major automobile and light truck companies, along with the product, market and supply chain strategies of key firms that are shaping the market for smart auto. 

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary    
    E.1 The Meanings and Locations of Smart Auto Glass    
    E.2 Four Key Drivers for the Use of Smart Glass in the Automotive Sector    
    E.2.1 Self-Tinting Glass in the Automotive Sector    
    E.2.2 PDLC Privacy Glass in the Automotive Sector    
    E.2.3 Smart Mirrors    
    E.2.4 Self-Cleaning Glass    
    E.2.5 Self-Healing Glass    
    E.2.6 Embedded Intelligence in Smart Auto Glass.    
    E.3 Six Companies that will Shape the Smart Auto Glass Business    
    E.4 Opportunities for Glass Makers    
    E.5 Opportunities for Specialty Chemical Companies    
    E.6 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Windows Materials

    Chapter One: Introduction    
    1.1 Background to this Report    
    1.1.1 Automobiles, Glass and the Internet-of-Things    
    1.1.2 Environment, Fuel Efficiency and Smart Glass    
    1.1.3 Smart Glass, Comfort and Design Trends    
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report    
    1.3 Methodology of this Report    
    1.4 Plan of this Report    

    Chapter Two: Assessment of Smart Glass Technologies for the Automotive Market    
    2.1 Forecasts and Forecasting Methodology    
    2.1.1 Scope of Forecasts    
    2.1.2 Data Sources    
    2.1.3 Alternative Scenarios and Market Risks    
    2.2 Strategic Role of Glass in the Automobile Industry    
    2.2.1 Growing Emphasis on Complex Glazing    
    2.3 Self-Tinting Windows and Window Film    
    2.3.1 Relationship to Retrofit Window Film Market    
    2.4 The Market for Electrochromic Glass in the Automotive Sector    
    2.4.1 Why Electrochromic Glass May Become More Common in the Automotive Sector    
    2.4.2 Suppliers of Electrochromic Windows for the Automotive Sector    
    2.4.3 Eight-Year Forecasts for Electrochromic Smart Windows in the Automotive Sector    
    2.4.4 Market Forecast and Supply Structure Analysis for Electrochromic Self-Dimming Auto Mirrors    
    2.5 Could SPD Dominate Auto Glass?    
    2.5.1 SPD Technology    
    2.5.2 SPD Customers in the Automotive Sector    
    2.5.3 Role of Research Frontiers    
    2.5.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of SPD Technology in the Automotive Sector    
    2.6 Thermochromic Glass in the Auto Industry    
    2.6.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of Thermochromic Technology in the Automotive Sector    
    2.7 Photochromic Glass in the Auto Industry    
    2.7.1 SWITCH Materials    
    2.7.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Photochromic Technology in the Automotive Sector
    2.8  PDLC and Privacy Glass in Autos    
    2.8.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of PDLC Technology in the Automotive Sector    
    2.9 Self-Cleaning Glass in the Automotive Sector    
    2.9.1 Self-Cleaning Glass Technology:  Current State of the Art and Future Technology Directions    
    2.9.2 Actual and Potential Suppliers of Self-Cleaning Glass Technology    
    2.9.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Self-Cleaning Automotive Glass    
    2.10 A Future for Self-Healing Glass in the Auto Industry?    
    2.10.1 Evolution of Self-Repairing Coatings    
    2.10.2 Firms Active in the Self-Healing/Self-Repairing Coating Sector    
    2.10.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Self-Healing Automotive Glass    
    2.11 Markets for Auto Glass-Embedded Electronics    
    2.11.1 Heads-Up Displays in Windshields    
    2.11.2 Glass for Dashboards, Information Displays and Entertainment Features    
    2.11.3 Adding Photovoltaic Capability to Auto Windows
    2.11.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Device-Enabled Automotive Glass    
    2.12 Potential for Multi-Functional Glass    
    2.13 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Glass in Automotive Sector by Technology
    2.14 Key Points from this Chapter  

     
    Chapter Three: Smart Glass in the Context of Automotive Industry Structure and Developments    
    3.1 Current Industry Structure and Behavior:  Implications for the Auto Glass Sector    
    3.1.1 Smart Glass and Existing Supply Structure for Auto Glass    
    3.1.2 Smart Glass and Auto Companies    
    3.1.3 Smart Glass and Vehicle Types    
    3.2 Smart Auto Glass and Current Design Trends    
    3.2.1 Smart Auto Glass May Have its Own Path for Environmental Considerations    
    3.2.2 Smart Auto Glass and Fuel Economy
    3.2.3 High-SPF Glass as an Alternative to Self-Tinting Glass    
    3.2.4 Windshield and Sunroof Design    
    3.2.5 Trend Towards More Automotive Telematics May Mean New Kinds of Display Glass    
    3.3 Smart Auto Glass and Current Production Trends    
    3.4 Key Points from this Chapter    
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report    
    About the Author

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-665 PUBLISHED February 18, 2014
Dye Sensitized Cell Markets - 2014
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY

    The recent announcement of dye sensitized cells (DSCs) based on perovskite material that provide a 15 percent efficiency shows that DSCs could be about to hit the PV mainstream.   With such new developments in mind, this new report forecasts and analyzes the market for DSCs over the next eight years.  NanoMarkets has been covering the ups and downs of the DSC sector for the past five years and we believe that DSC is entering into a new era. DSC technology will soon be able to provide efficiencies close to those of commercial thin-film solar panels.  And, for the first time for years, DSC will be competing in a stable market environment for solar panels.

    In the report, we examine how the leading players in the DSC space plan to generate revenues in this new business environment and how their addressable markets will grow in the next decade. Our analysis covers all the product/market areas that are being seriously suggested for DSC and shows how these markets are likely to evolve. 

    Because of its huge revenue potential we are especially interested in the building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) sector and we also take a serious look at the opportunity for selling DSC products into the developing world; a market that several DSC firms have specifically targeted. This report also appraises the commercial significance of recent technical developments in the DSC space, especially the development of improved electrolytes both solid-state and liquid.  

    As always with NanoMarkets reports, this report also contains granular, eight-year forecasts of DSC panel and materials shipments in volume and value terms, broken down by application wherever possible.  Materials covered include the critical components of the cells and modules; host, dye, and electrolyte materials; transparent and nontransparent electrode materials; and encapsulation materials.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Opportunities for DSC Panel Makers
    E.2 Opportunities for Materials Suppliers
    E.3 Eight Firms to Watch in the DSC Space
    E.4 Eight-Year Forecast Summary for DSC Markets
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    1.3.2 Data Sources
    1.3.3 Alternative Scenarios
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Important Recent Technical Trends in Dye Sensitized Cells
    2.1 Electrolytes
    2.1.1 Liquid
    2.1.2 Solid-State:  Beyond Iodine
    2.2 Electrode Materials
    2.2.1 Better Dopants for TiO2
    2.3 Future Use of Quantum Dots in DSCs
    2.4 Encapsulation and Substrates
    2.5 Eight-Year Projections of DSC Efficiencies
    2.5.1 Comparison to Other Thin-Film and Organic PV
    2.6 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Dye Sensitized Cells Markets and Forecasts
    3.1 Indoor Applications
    3.1.1 Solar Chargers
    3.1.2 Wireless Keyboards
    3.1.3 Apparel
    3.1.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Indoor DSC Applications
    3.2 Building-Integrated Photovoltaics
    3.2.1 BIPV Glass
    3.2.2 Solar Roofs
    3.2.3 Eight-Year Forecast of DSC in BIPV
    3.3 Retail Applications
    3.3.1 Outdoor and Indoor Advertising
    3.3.2 Point-of-Purchase Displays
    3.3.3 Solar Awnings and Umbrellas
    3.3.4 Eight-Year Forecast of DSC in Retail Applications
    3.4 Sensor Networks
    3.4.1 Eight-Year Forecast of DSC for Sensor Networks
    3.5 Emergency Power and Military Applications
    3.5.1 Eight-Year Forecast of DSC for Sensor Networks
    3.6 Automotive Applications
    3.6.1 Eight-Year Forecast of DSC for Sensor Networks
    3.7 Opportunities for DSC Products in Developing Nations
    3.8 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts
    3.8.1 Eight-Year Forecast by Type of Product and Application
    3.8.2 Eight-Year Forecast by Type of Material
    3.9 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four: DSC Suppliers and Strategies
    4.1.1 3G Solar
 (Israel)
    4.1.2 Dyesol (Australia)
    4.1.3 Fujikura (Japan)
    4.1.4 G24 Innovations (UK)
    4.1.5 Nissha Printing
 (Japan)
    4.1.6 NLAB Solar (Sweden)
    4.1.7 Oxford Photovoltaics (UK)
    4.1.8 Peccell (Japan)
    4.1.9 Samsung SDI
(Korea)
    4.1.10 Sharp (Japan)
    4.1.11 Solaronix (Switzerland)
    4.1.12 SolarPrint (Ireland)
    4.1.13 Sony (Japan)
    4.1.14 SolarPrint (Ireland)
    4.2 Large Specialty Chemical Company Strategies in the DSC Space
    4.2.1 BASF (Germany)
    4.2.2 Everlight Chemical (Taiwan)
    4.2.3 Merck (Germany)
    4.2.4 Umicore (Belgium)
PURCHASE OPTIONS
(1-2 Users) $2,495.00  
(Up to 10 users) $2,995.00  
(Unlimited) $3,495.00  
REPORT # Nano-705 PUBLISHED February 12, 2014
Markets for Silver Nanomaterials as Transparent Conductors
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY
    The growth of the touch-screen market has focused efforts on alternative materials that might make a dent in ITO’s dominance as a transparent conductor. Several years ago the hype was all about carbon nanotubes, but now it appears that nanomaterials made from silver are much more likely to gain market share.
     
    In this report, we assess the current state of the market for transparent conductors made with silver nanowires and silver nanoparticles. This report draws from research gathered from NanoMarkets ongoing industry research program in the area of transparent conductors, but we have also brought the story right up to date based on the latest developments in the sector, showing what the current prospects are for silver nanomaterials in the transparent conductor sector.
     
    This report describes the capabilities and strategies of the leading silver nanomaterial-based transparent conductor suppliers and also discusses commercially interesting developments at other firms.  In addition, this report contains an updated granular eight-year forecast of the silver nanomaterial market as a part of the larger transparent conductor market and also forecasts the market in all the key applications where silver nanowires have potential to gain traction.
     
    The all-important application here is touch screens, and that is the most likely place for silver materials considered in this report to succeed. But this report also discusses other applications including LCD and OLED displays, OLED lighting and PV panels.  NanoMarkets believes that this report will provide the reader with deep strategic insight into new developments and market forecasts for this important sector of the transparent conductor market.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Chapter One: Introduction    
    1.1 Background to this Report    
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report    
    1.4 Plan of this Report   
     
    Chapter Two: Silver Nanomaterials as Transparent Conductors   
    2.1 Trade-offs Between Conductivity and Transparency    
    2.2 Manufacturing Nanowires    
    2.2.1 Nanowires are Complicated    
    2.2.2 The Path from Raw Materials to Usable Panels    
    2.2.3 Horizontal or Vertical Supply Chain?    
    2.3 Silver Nanomaterials or Carbon Nanotubes?    
    2.3.1 Shifts in the Market    
    2.3.2 Can Silver Nanomaterials and Carbon Nanotubes Co-Exist?    
    2.4 Key Points from This Chapter
     

    Chapter Three: Applications and Markets for Silver Nanomaterials    
    3.1 Touch Screens: The Killer App    
    3.1.1 Silver Nanomaterials Have Some Advantages    
    3.1.2 Capacitive Touch Screens—Opportunities for Silver Nanomaterials    
    3.1.3 Resistive Touch Screens – Opportunities for Silver Nanomaterials    
    3.1.4 Competing Materials Pose a Challenge    
    3.2 OLED Displays and Lighting    
    3.2.1 Moving Toward Larger Panels
    3.2.2 OLED Lighting    
    3.3 PV Opportunities    
    3.3.1 Thin-Film PV    
    3.3.2 Organic PV and DSC    
    3.4 Other Applications    
    3.4.1 Electrodes for LCDs    
    3.4.2 E-Paper Displays    
    3.4.3 EMI Shielding    
    3.5 Key Points from This Chapter  

    Chapter Four: Key Firms to Watch    
    4.1 Cambrios (U.S.)    
    4.2 Carestream (U.S.)    
    4.3 Cima NanoTech (U.S.)    
    4.4 Other Silver Nanomaterial Suppliers    
    4.4.1 Blue Nano (U.S.)    
    4.4.2 ClearJet (Israel)    
    4.4.3 Saint-Gobain (France)    
    4.4.4 SeaShell Technology (U.S.)    
    4.5 Key Points from This Chapter  

    Chapter Five: Seven-Year Forecasts for Silver Nanomaterials as Transparent Conductors    
    5.1 Forecasting Methodology    
    5.1.1 Assumptions About Materials Utilization, Wastage and Yields    
    5.1.2 Cost Assumptions    
    5.1.3 General Economic Assumptions    
    5.1.4 Sources of Data    
    5.2 Forecasts for Aggregate Transparent Conductor Markets by Material Type and Application    
    5.3 Forecasts for Silver Nanomaterials by Application    
    5.4 Key Points from This Chapter    
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report    
    About the Authors  

    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit 2-1: Comparison of Transparent Conductive Materials    
    Exhibit 5-1:  Seven-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductive Materials by Material Type     
    Exhibit 5-2:  Seven-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductive Materials by Application      
    Exhibit 5-3:  Seven-Year Forecast of Silver Nanomaterials by Application ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 5-4: Forecast of Silver Nanomaterials by Application – Volume and Value   

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Single User $3,495.00  
Advanced (up to 5 users) $4,495.00  
Enterprise $5,495.00  
REPORT # ST-006 PUBLISHED February 10, 2014
Additive Manufacturing Opportunities in the Aerospace Industry:  A Ten-Year Forecast
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    In this report, SmarTech identifies the profitable opportunities of AM applications in aerospace industry. More than merely speculating on what AM can do in the aerospace industry, this report focuses down on exactly where and how AM will be implemented in the aerospace industry supply chain and business activities.  Readers of the report will gain an in-depth understanding of what AM means to the aerospace industry, as well as a comprehensive framework for understanding new developments in the industry.

    This report also analyzes the largest AM equipment manufacturers likely to supply the industry. Product portfolios are strategically analyzed to offer insight on how the specific technologies behind AM systems will affect their adoption in the aerospace industry.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One: Intro
    1.1 Background
    1.2 Opportunities In The Aerospace Industry
    1.3 Scope of This Report
    1.4 Methodology of This Report
    1.5 Plan of This Report

    Chapter Two: Current Applications for Additive Manufacturing in Commercial Aviation
    2.1 Viable Substitutes For Complex Sub-Assemblies
    2.1.1 Tier-Two Contracting Applications
    2.1.2 Tier-Three Contracting Applications
    2.2 Weight Reduction In Cabin Parts
    2.2.1 Re-Tooling The Existing Commercial Fleet
    2.2.2 Taking Advantage of CAD/CAM Design
    2.3 Ameliorating The Supply Chain For Replacement Parts
    2.3.1 Interfacing with the Open Aerospace Exchange
    2.4 Super Plastics As A Substitute For Small Metal Parts
    2.5 Functional Prototypes As A Competitive Advantage
    2.5.1 The Benefits of 3D Printing Clusters
    2.5.2 Assembling The Correct Portfolio of 3D Printers
    2.6 Next Level Integration AM-enabled Designs Into Airplane Designs
    2.7 Coping With Exacting Materials and Part Performance Requirements
    2.7.1 Progress in Materials Qualification
    2.7.2 New Innovations In Material Qualifications, Standards, and Regulation
    2.7.3 Test Equipment and Services

    Chapter Three: Additive Manufacturing in Military Applications
    3.1 Streamlining Development and Cycles and Combating Technological Crawl
    3.1.1 CAD/CAM Enables New Coordination And Collaboration
    3.2 Low-Volume Manufacturing Could Usher In New Production Paradigms
    3.2.1 The Last Generation of Combat Fighter: The Ever-Evolving Design
    3.3 Specific Applications in Military
    3.3.1 Fighter Aircraft
    3.3.2 Transport Aircraft
    3.3.3 Helicopters
    3.3.4 Drones
    3.4 AM In Combat Settings

    Chapter Four: Current Applications for Additive Manufacturing (AM) in Space Industry
    4.1 One-off Parts And Their Drag On The Economics of Space Travel
    4.2 Functional Prototyping Reduces Development Times
    4.3 Materials Cleared For Use In Space
    4.4 3D Printers In Space

    Chapter Five: Analysis of Key AM Equipment Manufacturers
    5.1 3D Systems
    5.2 Ex-One
    5.3 GE
    5.4 Arcam
    5.5 Concept Laser
    5.6 EOS
    5.7 Renishaw
    5.8 SLM Solutions
    5.9 Trumpf
    5.10 Sciaki
    5.11 DM3D Technologies
    5.12 Stratsys
    5.13 Voxeljet
    5.14 EnvisionTEC

    Chapter Six: Ten-Year Forecasts For 3D Printing In Aerospace
    6.1 Equipment
    6.2 Materials
    6.3 Software
    6.4 Services
    6.4.1 Market For Complex Sub-Assemblies
    6.4.2 Market For Replacement Parts
    6.4.3 Market For Functional Prototypes
    6.4.4 Market For Super Plastic Applications

    About the Author

    Acronyms Used in Report

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-671 PUBLISHED January 29, 2014
Markets and Opportunities for Transparent Displays: 2014 to 2021
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Emerging Electronics
  • SUMMARY
    NanoMarkets believes that the market for transparent displays is about to expand dramatically. “Smart glasses,” such as Google Glass and Augmented Reality (AR) applications have focused attention on displays that can simultaneously display information and function as windows on the real world. 
     
    Display firms have begun to respond to these major trends with novel types of transparent displays. To do so they have had to invent new technologies.  Transparent TFTs are especially challenging, with the most likely material solution being ZnO, though other options are possible.  Hiding backlighting in transparent LCDs is also an issue, creating opportunities for transparent OLED displays; but these have their own challenges too.
     
    In this report, NanoMarkets identifies where the revenues will be generated by transparent displays over the next eight years.  In addition to leading edge applications such as smart glasses and AR, this report also considers near-term applications for transparent displays in more mundane applications such as retail and automotive.
     
    This report is designed to be a guide to how transparent displays will be commercialized and provides both a roadmap to how the transparent display market will evolve and an assessment of the latest transparent display technology. 
     
    And in addition to granular eight-year forecasts of the transparent display market, this report also discusses the product/market strategies of transparent display makers, both large and small.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Why Does the Market Need Transparent Displays and Is this a New Mass Market?   
    E 1.1 Mobile Applications:  Vanguard for Transparent Displays   
    E 1.2 Are Wearables the Next Cell Phones and Will They Use Transparent Displays?   
    E.1.3 Retail and Marketing Applications: Smaller Addressable Market for Transparent Displays, but More Certain?   
    E.1.4 Beyond AR and Promo: Other Potential Opportunities for Transparent Displays   
    E.2 Key Opportunities for Technology Providers   
    E.2.1 Opportunities in Transparent LCDs:  Need Clever Ways to Get Rid of BLUs   
    E.2.3 Do Transparent Displays Need a New Frontplane Technology   
    E.3 Opportunities for Materials Firms in the Transparent Display Market:  Are There Any?   
    E.4 Opportunities for System Integrators and Value-added Resellers   
    E.5 Six Companies to Watch in the Transparent Display Sector   
    E. 5.1 Samsung (Korea)   
    E. 5.2 LG (Korea)   
    E. 5.3 AUO (Taiwan)   
    E.5.4 Planar (United States)   
    E. 5.5 Google (United States)   
    E. 5.6 Apple (United States)   
    E.5.7 UDC (United States)   
    E.6 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Displays 
      
    Chapter One: Introduction 
    1.1 Background to this Report   
    1.1.1 The Problem of Invisible Components in LCD Displays   
    1.1.2 Enter the Transparent OLED   
    1.1.3 Coda: The TFT Factor   
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report   
    1.3 Research and Forecasting Methodology   
    1.4 Plan of this Report   

    Chapter Two: Transparent Display Technologies
    2.1 Transparent Displays in the Context of the Display Industry   
    2.1.1 LED and EL:  The First Transparent Display Technologies   
    2.2 LCD-Based Transparent Display   
    2.2.1 Hiding or Eliminating Backlights   
    2.2.2 Suppliers of Transparent LCD Products   
    2.3 OLEDs 
    2.3.1 Suppliers of Transparent OLED Display Products   
    2.2.2 Suppliers of Transparent OLED Lighting Products   
    2.4 E-paper   
    2.4.1 Suppliers of Transparent E-paper Products   
    2.4 Materials and Enabling Technologies   
    2.4.1 Transparent TFTs   
    2.4.2 Substrate Options for Transparent Displays   
    2.4.3 Touch-screen Technology in Transparent Displays   
    2.4.4 Transparent Conductors for Transparent Electronics   
    2.5 Key Points from this Chapter   
     
    Chapter Three: Applications and Markets for Transparent Displays   
    3.1 Scope of Applications of the Transparent Display Technology   
    3.2 Mobile Displays   
    3.2.1 Early Entries in the Transparent Cell Phone Stakes   
    3.2.2 The Future of Transparent Displays in Tablets   
    3.2.3 Laptops and Notebooks   
    3.2.4 Eight-year Forecast of Mobile Transparent Displays by Application   
    3.2.5 Wearable Computing and Heads-Up Displays   
    3.2.6 Smart Glasses   
    3.2.7 Smart Watches   
    3.2.8 Eight-year Forecast of Transparent Displays in Smart Glasses   
    3.2.9 Eight-year Forecast of Transparent Displays in Wearables by Smart Watches   
    3.2.10 Eight-year Forecast of Transparent Displays in Wearables by Frontplane Technology   
    3.3 Retail Applications   
    3.3.1 Advertising Displays and Store Windows   
    3.3.2 Display Cases   
    3.3.3 Vending Machines   
    3.3.4 Eight-year Forecast of Transparent Displays in Retail   
    3.4 Building-related Applications   
    3.4.1 Hybrid Window/Displays   
    3.4.2 Refrigerators and Other Appliances   
    3.4.3 Eight-year Forecast of Transparent Displays for Buildings by Application   
    3.5 Other Markets for Transparent Displays   
    3.5.1 Casino Games   
    3.5.2 Museum Displays   
    3.5.3 Automotive Applications   
    3.5.4 Military Applications   
    3.6 Role of Systems Integrators and Value-Added Resellers   
    3.7 Summary of Eight-year Market Forecasts   
    3.7.1 By Application   
    3.7.2 By Frontplane Technology   
    3.8 Key Points in this Chapter  
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report   
    About the Author  
     
    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Eight-Year Revenue Forecasts for Transparent Display Markets by Applications ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit E-2:  Eight-Year Forecasts for Transparent Display Markets by Frontplane Technology ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 2-1: Status of Suppliers of Transparent LCD Display Panels   
    Exhibit 2-2: Status of Suppliers of Transparent OLED Display and Lighting Panels   
    Exhibit 2-3: Firms to Watch in the Metal Oxide TFT Space   
    Exhibit 3-1: Examples of Transparent Cell Phones and Tablets   
    Exhibit 3-2: Prospects for Transparent Laptops   
    Exhibit 3-3: Eight Year Forecast for Transparent Displays in LCD Cell Phones   
    Exhibit 3-4: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent OLED Cell Phones   
    Exhibit 3-5: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent LCD Tablets   
    Exhibit 3-6: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent OLED Tablets   
    Exhibit 3-7: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent LCD Laptops   
    Exhibit 3-8: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent OLED Laptops   
    Exhibit 3-9:  Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent LCD PC monitors   
    Exhibit 3-10: Prospects of Transparent Wearable Glasses   
    Exhibit 3-11: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent LCD Head Mounted Displays (HMDs) (Industrial and niche applications)   
    Exhibit 3-12: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent OLED HMDs (Industrial and niche applications)   
    Exhibit 3-13: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent LCD HMDs (Consumer applications)   
    Exhibit 3-14: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent OLED HMDs (Consumer applications)   
    Exhibit 3-15: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent LCD Smart Watches   
    Exhibit 3-16: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent OLED Smart Watches   
    Exhibit 3-17: Eight-Year Forecast for Total Transparent Wearable Devices Market   
    Exhibit 3-18: Prospects of Transparent Advertising Windows and Store Displays   
    Exhibit 3-19: Prospects of Transparent Vending Machines   
    Exhibit 3-20: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent LCD Retail Store Displays   
    Exhibit 3-21: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent OLED Retail Store Displays   
    Exhibit 3-22: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent LCD Digital Signage   
    Exhibit 3-23: Eight-Year Forecast for Transparent LCD Vending Machines   
    Exhibit 3-24: Eight-Year Forecast for Total Transparent Retail Devices Market   
    Exhibit 3-25: Prospects for Transparent Appliance-Related Applications   
    Exhibit 3-26: Eight-Year Forecasts for Transparent LCD Refrigerator and Freezer Doors   
    Exhibit 3-27: Prospects for Other Transparent Applications   
    Exhibit 3-28: Eight-Year Forecasts for Transparent LCD Casino Displays   
    Exhibit 3-29: Eight-Year forecast of Transparent LCD Automobile Windshields, Rear-view Mirrors and Dashboards   
    Exhibit 3-30: Eight-Year Forecast of Transparent OLED Automobile Windshields, Rearview Mirrors and Dashboards   
    Exhibit 3-31: Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent LCD Military HMDs   
    Exhibit 3-32: Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent OLED Military HMDs   
    Exhibit 3-33: Eight-Year Revenue Forecasts of Transparent Display by Applications ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 3-34: Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Display by Frontplane Technology ($ Million)   
PURCHASE OPTIONS
(1-2 Users) $2,495.00  
(Up to 10 users) $2,995.00  
(Unlimited) $3,495.00  
REPORT # Nano-691 PUBLISHED January 20, 2014
Markets for Metal Meshes as Transparent Conductors-2014
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    This report analyzes new developments in metal meshes that make them a serious contender as a TC.

    While all metal-based TCs used to be lumped together in one category, the TC industry now distinguishes between metal meshes, in which the metal is patterned in a regular grid, and nanowire structures, in which much smaller metal structures form a random network.

    This report covers only metal meshes, be they made from silver, copper, or other metals. We do look at the overall TC market to analyze how metal meshes fit into the market but do not report on other TC materials in detail. Our separate Transparent Conductors report covers the wide range of materials being used as TCs.

    This report expands greatly upon the relatively small section on metal meshes in our last transparent conductors report. We especially look at the growing number of companies manufacturing metal meshes and evaluate their strategies, offerings, capabilities, and readiness for volume production. There are at least 15 companies with products worth considering, a major change from just a short time ago.

    We cover opportunities in several sectors where metal meshes are especially promising. The first of these is in touch panels, where applications include a range of display sizes, from phones and tablets to laptop computers. This is the most important market for meshes in the next few years.

    Over the eight-year forecast period, several other applications are likely to increase in importance. Metal meshes are very good for large panels, because they can spread the voltage across the entire panel. Fine pitch metal meshes are compelling for OLED lighting panels, although the commercial success of these panels is in no way guaranteed. There are definitely opportunities in OLED TVs, and solar panels, especially thin film and organic PV.

    This report is international in scope. The forecasts herein are worldwide forecasts and we have not been geographically selective in the firms that we have covered in this report or interviewed in order to collect information. Where there are markets and opportunities that are oriented in one way or another to one particular region we note this. For example, many of the important OEMs for TCs are in the display industry, which is strongly focused in Asia, while thin-film PV makers tend to be in the U.S. and Europe.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Metal Mesh Transparent Conductors—Technologies and Capabilities
    2.1 How Does Metal Mesh Fit into the Transparent Conductor Market?
    2.1.1 Growing Interest in Meshes
    2.2 Comparison with Other Transparent Conductors
    2.3 Key Advantages of Metal Meshes
    2.4 Limitations of Metal Meshes
    2.5 Silver or Copper?
    2.6 The Future of Metal Meshes: Recent Developments
    2.7 Key Points from This Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Applications and Markets for Metal Mesh Transparent Conductors
    3.1 Touch: The Killer App
    3.1.1 Transparent Conductor Makers May be Overestimating the Potential in the Touch Segment
    3.1.2 Capacitive Touch Screens – Opportunities for Metal Mesh
    3.1.3 Resistive Touch Screens – Opportunities for Metal Mesh
    3.1.4 The Path Forward
    3.2 Large Displays and OLED Lighting
    3.2.1 Moving Toward Larger Panels
    3.2.2 OLED Lighting
    3.3.3 Why Metal Meshes?
    3.3 Solar Panels
    3.3.1 Thin Film PV – Opportunities for Metal Mesh
    3.3.2 Organic and DSC PV – Opportunities for Metal Mesh
    3.4 Combining Metal Meshes with ITO
    3.5 Other Applications
    3.5.1 EMI Shielding
    3.5.2 Transparent Heating Films
    3.6 Key Points from this Chapter
     
     
    Chapter Four: Firms to Watch
    4.1 3M (U.S.)
    4.2 Atmel (U.S.)
    4.3 Dai Nippon Printing (Japan)
    4.4 Epigem (U.K.)
    4.5 Fujifilm (Japan)
    4.6 Gunze (Japan)
    4.7 Hitachi Chemical (Japan)
    4.8 JTOUCH Corporation (Taiwan)
    4.9 Mirae Nanotech (Korea)
    4.10 O-film Tech Co. (China)
    4.11 PolyIC (Germany)
    4.12 Rolith (U.S.)
    4.13 Toppan (Japan)
    4.14 UniPixel (U.S.)
    4.15 Visual Planet (U.K.)
    4.16 Young Fast (Taiwan)
    4.17 Zytronic (U.S.)
    4.18 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Five: Seven-Year Forecasts for Metal Meshes as Transparent Conductors
    5.1 Forecasting Methodology
    5.1.1 Assumptions About Materials Utilization, Wastage and Yields
    5.1.2 Cost Assumptions
    5.1.3 General Economic Assumptions
    5.1.4 Sources of Data
    5.2 Forecasts for Overall Transparent Conductor Market by Material Type and Application
    5.3 Forecasts for Metal Meshes by Application
    5.4 Key Points from this Chapter
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Authors
     
    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit 2-1: Comparison of Transparent Conductive Materials. 
    Exhibit 4-1: Materials and Properties of Metal Mesh Films by Supplier 
    Exhibit 5-1: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductive Materials by Material Type ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 5-2:  Summary of Seven-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductive Materials by Application ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 5-3:  Summary of Forecast of Metal Meshes by Application ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 5-4: Forecast of Metal Meshes by Application – Volume and Value
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-667 PUBLISHED January 15, 2014
Thin-Film and Printed Batteries Markets 2014-2021
CATEGORIES :
  • Emerging Electronics
  • SUMMARY

    NanoMarkets has provided coverage on the thin-film and printed batteries market for six years and has a deep understanding of what makes this market tick.  During the period we have covered these power sources, some of the firms in this space have made slow but steady progress both technically and in terms of business development; a few of them are generating significant revenue.  Other thin-film and printed battery firms have quit the market.

    What have changed are the markets that are being addressed by these batteries.  When the thin-film and printed battery business first appeared, the thought was that the main opportunity for them was RFID.  But RFIDs have not taken off in the way that many people hoped.  By contrast, these “thin” batteries have proved highly suited for powered smartcards, but for now this just a niche.

    Now it seems that a new opportunity might be appearing in the form of the so-called “Internet-of-things,” which promises ubiquitous sensors and other low-cost electronics.  Such devices need to be powered and “thin” batteries may be just the power source that the Internet-of-Things needs.  Has the thin-film and printed battery business suddenly found itself in the right place at the right time?

    In this year’s report, NanoMarkets analyzes these emerging opportunities.  We also discuss the latest materials and design strategies being pursued by the thin-film and printed battery makers and assess how successful they are likely to be in the marketplace.  As with all NanoMarkets reports, this report includes an eight-year forecast in volumes and value terms.  We also discuss the funding of firms in this space and how that will shape the thin-film battery market. 

    This report will be important reading not just for firms in the battery industry, but for all firms interested in the new opportunities appearing in the Internet-of-Things, smart packaging and other related markets.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Important Changes in the Thin-Film/Printed Battery Market Since Last Year's Report 
    E.1.1 Entries and Exits:  Firms that Have Entered and Left the Sector Since the Previous Report
    E.1.2 Market Shifts:  From RFIDs to Smartcards to Sensor Networks and Green Electronics
    E.2 Improvements in Battery Manufacturing Technology
    E.3 Opportunities for Materials Suppliers
    E.4 Firms to Watch
    E.5 Recent Investments and Investment Trends in the Thin-Film and Printed Battery Segment
    E.6 Role of Business Ecosystems
    E.7 Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts for Thin-Film and Printed Batteries
     
    Chapter One: Introduction 
    1.1 Background to this Report 
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report 
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.3.1 Forecasting Methodology 
    1.3.2 Information Sources 
    1.3.3 Economic Assumptions 
    1.3.4 Pricing Assumptions and Strategies 
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Important Recent Technical Trends in Thin-Film and Printed Batteries
    2.1 Energy/Power Density
    2.2 Form Factor: Size, Shape and Flexibility 
    2.3 Environmental and Safety Advantages 
    2.4 Temperature Stability 
    2.5 Lifetime
    2.6 Manufacturing Technology
    2.6.1 Improvements in Printed Batteries
    2.6.2 Recent Manufacturing Improvements for Thin-Film Batteries
    2.7 Improvements in Electrolytes and Electrodes
    2.8 Opportunities for Substrate Manufacturers?   .
    2.9 Key Points in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Sensor Networks as the Next Big Market for “Thin” Batteries:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    3.1 How the Internet-of-Things is Changing Sensor Networks
    3.1.1 Current and Future Battery Requirements
    3.1.2 Implications for “Thin” Battery Manufacturers
    3.2 The Role of Printed Batteries in Sensor Networks
    3.3 What is the Threat to “Thin” Batteries from Energy Harvesting?
    3.4 Opportunities for Battery and Sensor Integration
    3.5 The Military as a Test Market for “Thin” Batteries in Sensor Market
    3.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Printed and Thin-Film Batteries in Sensors and Sensor Networks 
    3.7 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four: “Thin” Batteries for Smartcards:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    4.1 Evolution and Future of the Powered Smart Card Business
    4.1.1 How Well are OTP Cards Catching On?
    4.1.2 What Other Applications for Powered Smartcards are Commercially Viable
    4.2 Current and Future Battery Requirements for Smartcards
    4.2.1 Implications for “Thin” Battery Manufacturers
    4.2.2 Impact of Card Manufacturing Technology on Battery Requirements
    4.3 Eight-Year Forecast of Printed and Thin-Film Batteries in Smartcards 
    4.4 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Five: “Thin” Batteries for Smart Packaging and Other Disposables:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    5.1 Which Smart Packaging Applications Need Batteries?
    5.1.1 Food Packaging
    5.1.2 Pharmaceutical Packaging
    5.2 Battery Applications in Other Disposable Products
    5.2.1 Medical Disposables
    5.2.2 Interactive Media, Toys, Games, etc.
    5.3 Current and Future Battery Requirements for Smart Packaging and Disposables
    5.3.1 Implications for “Thin” Battery Manufacturers
    5.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Printed and Thin-Film Batteries in Smart Packaging 
    5.5 Key Points in this Market
     
    Chapter Six: Other Applications for “Thin” Batteries
    6.1 Medical Devices:  Eight-Year Forecast of “Thin” Battery Use
    6.1.1 Medical Implants
    6.1.2 CPR Devices
    6.2 Semiconductor and Computer Industry Applications:  Eight-Year Forecasts of “Thin” Battery Use
    6.2.1 Computer Memories and Clocks
    6.3 Future Applications for “Thin” Batteries
    6.4 Key Points in this Market
     
    Chapter Seven:  Summary of Eight-Year “Thin” Battery Forecasts
    7.1 Summary of Eight-Year “Thin” Battery Forecasts by Application
    7.1.1 Thin-Film Batteries
    7.1.2 Printed Batteries
    7.2 Summary of Eight-Year “Thin” Battery Forecasts by Battery Chemistry
    7.2.1 Thin-Film Batteries
    7.2.2 Printed Batteries
     
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Single User $3,495.00  
Advanced (up to 5 users) $4,495.00  
Enterprise $5,495.00  
REPORT # ST-007 PUBLISHED January 15, 2014
Bio-Printing Markets: A Ten-Year Opportunity Forecast
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    Bio-printing is a young but emerging field of study, whose ramifications are increasingly commercial. Promises of 3D-printed organs may catch the attention of the media, but the time has come for the wider market to take notice as well. More imminent applications of bio-printing technology will drive growth and galvanize bio-printing into a real industry over the next decade. This industry will require dedicated hardware, software, and materials that suite its needs, and present considerable revenue opportunities.

    Bio-printing may only be a blip on the screen of many executives now, but this industry is flying below the radar. It is time for the business community to take notice of bio-printing: to make efforts towards understanding exactly how what it will do and what opportunities it represents.

    In this report, SmarTech identifies the current state of the bio-printing sector though an analysis of processes, software, and materials employed by the industry. More than simply an industry survey, this report focuses on the strategies employed in the bio-printing market through an analysis of key players.  Readers of the report will gain an understanding of the dynamics of the industry as it stands today, as well as a framework for contextualizing new developments.

    The second half of the report discusses the commercial applications of bio-printing today and in the future. We have organized bio-printing opportunities on our own timeline; from the most realizable to the most distant. This discussion spans across tissues for drug testing and drug qualification, localized medicinal therapies, breast augmentation, bio-printed tissues, and total organ replacement.

    Each opportunity is thoroughly analyzed, providing the reader with a clear understanding of technological progress, market size, timing to market, and associated risks. We have also included a discussion of the sources of current and future funding for bio-printing, which helps the reader understand what will keep the fire burning as bio-printing approaches these more dramatic commercial opportunities.

    This report concludes with a discussion of the five biggest challenges that bio-printing will face over the next decade. It is critical these issues be addressed by all stakeholders in bio-printing, as the trajectory of the industry ultimately hinges on their successful resolution.

    SmarTech believes that this report will provide invaluable guidance for material, software, and equipment manufacturing companies in the bio-medical industry, 3D printing industry, and other related sectors. This report will also interest specialty chemical firms, cell culturers, and forward-thinking medical professionals, clinics and laboratories.  We also think that this report will prove to be required reading for investors in the budding bio-printing sector.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter 1: Bio-Printing Technology
    1.1 Bio-Printing Processes
    1.1.1 Bio-Plotting (Extrusion-Based Processes)
    1.1.2 Inkjet
    1.1.3 Stereolithography and Other Light Curing Processes
    1.1.4 Biological Laser Printing
    1.1.5 Laser Direct Write
    1.1.6 Acoustic Droplet Ejection
    1.1.7 Magnetic Levitation
    1.1.8 Drivers of Future Value
    1.1.9 The Plea for Hardware Standardization
    1.1.10 Future Consideration for Equipment Development
    1.2 Bio-Printing Software
    1.2.1 Mimics, Amira, and Other Medical Imaging Software
    1.2.2 File Creation Software
    1.2.3 CAD Software and the New Bio-Printing Code
    1.2.4 Software Addressing 4D Analysis
    1.2.5 Bio-Printing Software Price Changes Over the Next Decade
    1.3 Bio-Printing Materials
    1.3.1 Biodegradable Lattices
    1.3.2 Hydrogels, Bio-Paper and Bio-Ink
    1.3.3 Cell Cultures
    1.3.4 Commercialization Demands Innovation In Cell Culturing

    Chapter 2: Commercial Opportunities
    2.1 Sources of Funding
    2.2 Creating a Roadmap towards Commercialization
    2.3 Opportunity Timeline
    2.3.1 New Drug Screening
    2.3.2 Localized Direct Bio-Printed Therapies and Bio-Pen Applications
    2.3.3 Breast Reconstruction and Augmentation
    2.3.4 Bio-Printed Tissues
    2.3.5 Partial Organ Therapies
    2.3.6 Prospects for the 3D Printed Heart

    Chapter 3: Forecasts of the Bio-Printing Sector
    3.1 Market Overview
    3.2 Forecasts for Global Bio-Printing Labs
    3.3 Forecasts for the Bio-Printing Equipment Market
    3.4 Material Forecasts
    3.5 Forecasts for the Bio-Printing Software Market

    Chapter 4: Five Core Issues for the Next Ten Years
    4.1 Navigating the Bottleneck of Bio-Printed Vasculature Systems
    4.2 The Rift between Bio-Printing and the Practicing Medical Community
    4.3 The Roadmap to Commercialization
    4.4 The Call for Process Standardization
    4.5 The Time for Dedicated Bio-Printing Hardware, Software, and Materials

    About SmarTech Markets Publishing

    About the Analyst

    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit 1-1: Advantages of Extrusion Based Bio-Printing Processes
    Exhibit 1-2: Medical Imaging Software
    Exhibit 2-1: Opportunities in Bio-Printed Tissues
    Exhibit 3-1: 10-Year Bio-Printing Market Summary
    Exhibit 3-2: 10-Year Forecast of Global Bio-Printing Labs
    Exhibit 3-3: 10-Year Bio-Printer Market Overview
    Exhibit 3-4: 10-Year Professional Bio-Printer Market
    Exhibit 3-5: 10-Year Compact Bio-Printer Market
    Exhibit 3-6: 10-Year Bio-Printing Materials Market Overview
    Exhibit 3-7: 10-Year Cellular Materials Forecasts for Professional Printers
    Exhibit 3-8: 10-Year Cellular Materials Forecasts for Compact Printers
    Exhibit 3-9: 10-Year Hydrogel Materials Forecasts for Professional Printers
    Exhibit 3-10: 10-Year Hydrogel Material Forecasts for Compact Printers
    Exhibit 3-11: 10-Year Bio-Degradable Plastics Forecasts for Professional Printers
    Exhibit 3-12: 10-Year Bio-Degradable Plastics Forecasts for Compact Printers
    Exhibit 3-13: 10-Year Software Forecast for Bio-Printers
    Exhibit 3-14: 10-Year Software Forecast for Professional Bio-Printers
    Exhibit 3-15: 10-Year Software Forecast for Compact Bio-Printers
    Exhibit 4-1: Bio-Printing Commercialization Timeline

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-661 PUBLISHED December 12, 2013
LED Phosphor Markets-2014
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    This new NanoMarkets report provides a thorough analysis of the latest opportunities in the LED phosphor markets.  It builds on NanoMarkets’ successful 2012 phosphor report and shows how the phosphor market is shifting in response to latest developments in both display backlighting and general illumination markets.

    In this years’ report, we are placing special attention on some of the newer phosphor chemistries such as nanophosphors, glass phosphors and QDs.  And we also ask and answer the question as to how new phosphor materials can build market share in a market crowded in new materials.

    We identify how performance improvements are likely to help grow addressable markets for phosphors, with an especial focus on general illumination, outdoor/street lighting and backlighting and how money will be made in the LED phosphor market.

    The report also includes NanoMarkets’ assessments of the product/market strategies of leading firms active in the LED phosphors space.  And, as always with our reports, this report contains granular eight-year forecasts of the LED phosphors shipments in volume and value terms, with breakouts by type of phosphor and type of application.  This report is required reading, not just for strategy planners at phosphor firms, but for those throughout the solid-state lighting and display industries.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Important changes since NanoMarkets’ previous phosphor report
    E.2 Key opportunities for LED phosphors

    E.2.1 Opportunities for independent phosphor makers

    E.2.2 Opportunities for LED firms
    E.2.3 Opportunities for the lighting and display industry

    E.2.4 Potential for startups
    E.3 Firms to watch in LED phosphors

    E.3.1 The growing importance of China
    E.3.2 Other important phosphor firms to watch
    E.3.3 LED firms that shape the phosphor market
    E.4 Thoughts on China as a supplier and user of LED phosphors

    E.5 Summary of eight-year forecasts for LED phosphors

    Chapter One: Introduction

    1.1 Background to this report

    1.2 Objectives and scope of this report

    1.3 Methodology of this report

    1.4 Plan of this report

    Chapter Two:  Phosphors: Materials and Products
    2.1 Standard conversion: Blue LEDs with Ce-YAG coatings

    2.1.1 How dominant will standard phosphor technologies
    2.1.2 Who controls the IP
    2.1.2 What happens when critical phosphor IP expires?
    2.2 White phosphors

    2.3 UV and NUV strategies

    2.4 CCT and the warm white technology gap

    2.5 Phosphor-on-LED vs. remote phosphor coatings
    2.6 Emerging phosphor strategies

    2.6.1 Thin-film phosphors

    2.6.2 Glass phosphors

    2.6.3 Nanophosphors

    2.7 Emerging competition for improved phosphors

    2.7.1 RGB LED combinations

    2.7.2 QD-coated LEDs

    2.8 Pricing trends
    2.8.1 Expectations for price declines for novel phosphors

    2.9 Key points made in this chapter

    Chapter Three:  Phosphor Markets:  Opportunities and Challenges

    3.1 Factors shaping the use of phosphors in general illumination markets
    3.1.1 Current consumer dissatisfaction with LED and CFL lighting

    3.1.2 Regional differences in lighting tastes
    3.1.3 CRI and CCT goals
    3.1.4 Which phosphors will succeed in the general illumination market?
    3.2 Outdoor/street lighting

    3.2.1 Current and future CRI and CCT requirements for street lighting

    3.2.2 Current and future CRI and CCT requirements for other outdoor lighting
    3.2.3 Which phosphors will succeed in the outdoor/street lighting market?
    3.3 LED backlights
for displays
    3.3.1 Light uniformity and its impact on the phosphor market

    3.3.2 Edge-lit LCDs and phosphors

    3.3.3 Which phosphors will succeed in the outdoor/street lighting market?
    3.4 Automotive lighting
    3.4.1 LED lighting requirements and tastes for auto lighting:  implications for phosphors
    3.4.1 Which phosphors will succeed in the auto market?
    3.5 Notes on phosphors in audiovisual, theater and other specialty lighting
    3.6 The rare earth supply problem
    3.6.1 Current situation
    3.6.2 Which rare earths will remain in shortage?
    3.6.3 Implications for the phosphor sector
    3.7 Manufacturing challenges for phosphors

    3.7.1 Challenges
    3.7.2 Long-term manufacturing technology strategies for phosphors
    3.8 Potential health and safety issues with phosphors

    3.9 Key points made in this chapter

    Chapter Four: LED Phosphors Markets and Forecasts

    4.1 Forecasting methodology

    4.1.1 Pricing assumptions

    4.2 Eight-Year forecasts of LED phosphors by application

    4.3 Eight-Year forecasts of LED phosphors by type of phosphor material and technology

    4.4 Eight-Year forecasts of LED phosphors by location of customer
    4.5 Alternative scenarios

    Acronyms and abbreviations used in this report

    About the author

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-677 PUBLISHED December 09, 2013
Smart Windows Materials Markets: 2014-2021
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    In the past five years or so, smart (i.e. self-dimming) windows have taken off in both residential and commercial building markets.  They are also increasingly used in automobiles and trucks.  There are several different smart windows technologies, but all of them are materials plays in one way or another. NanoMarkets believes that, as a result, there are important opportunities for materials firms that are emerging from the smart windows “revolution.”

    The objective of this report is to identify and quantify these opportunities. The report contains a granular eight-year forecast in both volume and value terms as well as an assessment of the strategies being deployed in this market by notable firms.

    In this report NanoMarkets discusses the opportunities for materials in smart windows and mirrors using electrochromic, photochromic, thermochromic, PDLC, SPD and microblinds.  The forecasts and analysis cover not only the active smart materials used in these technologies, but also the substrate materials; both plastic and glass.  We also examine changing manufacturing patterns within the smart windows sector.

    In addition, this report analyzes a number of different business models being used in the smart windows sector and shows how materials play into the total smart windows value chain.  We also discuss the role of technology licensing, as well as direct supply of smart coatings and other materials to glass and windows firms. 

    NanoMarkets has been covering the smart glass business for more than five years and has therefore acquired a deep understanding of the dynamics of the smart windows sector and of materials selection within that sector.   We believe that this report will be of vital interest to specialty chemical firms, as well as both display and build glassmakers, along with windows firms.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Comparison of Smart Windows Materials and Technologies
    E.1.1 End-User Choice Pattern in the Smart Windows
    E.2 Materials Opportunities in the Electrochromic Windows Space
    E.3 Materials Opportunities in Photochromic Windows
    E.4 Materials Opportunities in SPD Windows
    E.5 Materials Opportunities in Thermochromic Windows
    E.6 Materials Opportunities in PDLC Windows
    E.7 Materials Opportunities in Micro-Blinds
    E.8 Eight Firms to Watch in the Smart Windows Materials Space
    E.8.1 Technology Providers:  Critical Specifiers
    E.8.2 Glass Companies:  Multiple Roles
    E.8.3 Specialty Chemical Companies:  Waiting in the Wings
    E.8.4 Eight Firms to Watch in the Smart Windows Materials
    E.9 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Windows Materials

    Chapter One:  Introduction
    1.1 Background to This Report
    1.1.1 Electrochromics Rises
    1.1.2 And the Others:  Thermochromic and Photochromic Materials, SPD and PDLC
    1.2 Objective and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.3.1 Data Collection
    1.3.2 Forecasting Methodology
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Electrochromic Smart Windows
    2.1 Evolution and Performance of Electrochromic Smart Windows
    2.2 Advantages of Electrochromic Glass and Film
    2.2.1 Switching Speeds and How They Influence Materials Choice
    2.3 Manufacturing Developments
    2.4 Electrochromic Materials for Smart Windows
    2.4.1 Transition Metal Oxides (TMOs)
    2.4.2 Polymers
    2.4.3 Reflective Hydride
    2.4.4 Nanocrystals
    2.4.5 Transparent Conductors
    2.4.6 Glass versus Film Options
    2.5 Products and Suppliers
    2.5.1 Chromogenics
    2.5.2 Gentex
    2.5.3 Sage
    2.5.4  US e-Chromic
    2.5.5  View
    2.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electrochromic Materials in Smart Windows
    2.5 Key Points in this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Photochromic and Hybrid Photochromic/ Electrochromic Smart Windows
    3.1 Smart Photochromic Windows
    3.1.1 Ability of Photochromic Materials to Provide a Platform for Smart Windows
    3.2  Notable R&D in Photochromic Smart Windows
    3.2.1 Photochromic and Photoelectrochromic R&D at Fraunhofer ISE (Germany)
    3.3 SWITCH Materials (Canada)
    3.3.1 Funding
    3.3.2 Test Installations
    3.4 Photochromic Films for the Automotive Aftermarket and Building Retrofit
    3.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Photochromic Materials in Smart Windows
    3.5.1 Pure Photochromic Films
    3.5.2 Photochromic/Electrochromic Hybrids
    3.6 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Four: Thermochromic Materials for Smart Windows
    4.1 Characteristics of Current Thermochromic Technology
    4.2 Main Materials Trends for Thermochromic Smart Windows
    4.2.1 Suntek and Cloud Gel
    4.2.2 Pleotint’s Materials Platform
    4.2.3 Ravenbrick Materials Platform
    4.2.4 New Research Directions:  Nanotechnology
    4.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Thermochromic Materials in Smart Windows
    4.4 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Five: Suspended Particle Devices (SPD)
    5.1 SPD Technology and Likely Future Advancements
    5.1.1 Assessment of SPD Technology Performance
    5.1.2 R&D Directions for SPD Technology Performance
    5.2 Role of Research Frontiers
    5.2.1 Manufacturing by Hitachi and SPD Products Offered
    5.3 Market Development for SPD
    5.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of SPD Materials in Smart Windows
    5.4.1 Positive Factors Influencing the SPD Market
    5.4.2 Negative Factors Influencing the SPD Market
    5.5 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Six: PDLC
    6.1 Trends in PDLC Materials Technology
    6.1.1  Technology, Variations and Future Improvements
    6.1.2 Privacy Glass and Beyond:  PDLC’s Achilles Heel
    6.1.3 Future Evolution of PDLC Technology
    6.1.4 Scienstry and NPD-LCD
    6.2 PDLC Supply Structure
    6.2.1 PDLC at Toray
    6.2.2 Other Suppliers of PDLC Technology
    6.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of PDLC Materials in Smart Windows
    6.4 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Seven: Some Thoughts on Micro-Blinds
    7.1 Micro-Blinds in the Context of Smart Windows Research
    7.2  The Micro-Blind Concept
    7.3 Materials and Manufacturing for Micro-blinds
    7.4 Performance Claims and Possible Applications
    7.5 The Commercial Future of Micro-Blinds
    7.6 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Eight: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Windows Materials
    8.1 Background to Forecasts
    8.2 Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecast by Type of Smart Windows Technology
    8.3 Eight-Year Forecast by Substrate Technology
    8.4 Eight-year Forecast of Smart Materials Used by Coating/Printing Technology
    8.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Transparent Conductors Used in Smart Windows
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1:  Comparison of Smart Windows Materials and Technologies 
    Exhibit E-2: Customer Choice Possibilities in the Smart Windows Materials Markets 
    Exhibit E-3: Firms to Watch in the Smart Windows Market 
    Exhibit E-4:  Market for Smart Windows Materials 
    Exhibit 2-1:  Materials Platform Evolution in the Electrochromic Windows Market 
    Exhibit 2-2:  Commercial Electrochromic Materials for Smart Windows 
    Exhibit 2-3: Eight-Year Forecast of Electrochromic Materials for Smart Windows 
    Exhibit 3-1: Eight-Year Forecast of Photochromic Materials for Smart Windows 
    Exhibit 4-1: Eight-Year Forecast of Thermochromic Materials for Smart Windows 
    Exhibit 5-1:  SPD Specifications 
    Exhibit 5-2:  Potential for Improvement in the SPD Materials Platform 
    Exhibit 5-3: Selected SPD Licensees 
    Exhibit 6-1: Eight-Year Forecast of PDLC Materials for Smart Windows 
    Exhibit 8-1: Eight-Year Forecast of Active Smart Windows Materials by Type ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 8-2: Eight-Year Forecast of Passive Smart Windows Materials by Type ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 8-3: Eight-Year Forecast of Passive Smart Windows Materials by Active/Passive Technology ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 8-4: Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Windows Primary Substrate Materials ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 8-5: Eight-Year Forecast of Passive Smart Windows Materials by Coating/Printing Technology Used ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 8-6: Eight-Year Forecast of Active Smart Windows Materials by Type of Electrode 

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Single User $3,495.00  
Advanced (up to 5 users) $4,495.00  
Enterprise $5,495.00  
REPORT # ST-008 PUBLISHED December 05, 2013
3D Printing in Medical and Dental Markets: An Opportunity Analysis and Ten-Year Forecast
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    3D printing has already found substantial traction in the dental implant and hearing aid business and SmarTech believes that the prospects for many other uses of 3D printing in the medical/dental market are rosy.  There are numerous applications in the healthcare field where highly customized products, such as implants, must be created quickly.  3D printing fits such needs extremely well and we believe that medical/dental will become a big money spinner for the 3D printing sector in the near future.

    In this report SmarTech identifies the main opportunities for 3D printing in the medical and dental environments.  It surveys the current use of 3D printers in this area and shows where the business opportunities will be found in the future.  It also identifies current weaknesses in 3D printing and where 3D printers, software and services must adapt to make money from these opportunities.

    In addition to the 3D printers themselves, the report covers and forecasts the demand for related 3D printing services, scanners, software and materials. The report also includes ten-year forecasts of all the important medical- and dental-related markets for 3D printing with breakouts by type of printers (professional and prosumer), 3D scanners used, as well as related software and services.

    While, 3D printing of medical and dental products may use conventional 3D printing materials for some applications, such as model building, specialized ceramic, metal and eve biological materials will also be required. With this in mind, we have also included a forecast of materials used by medical/dental community for 3D printing applications.  In addition, the report provides a discussion of how the 3D printed medical/dental markets break out by geography, reflecting the many differences in healthcare arrangements around the world.

    The report concludes with an assessment of the medical related strategies of 15 leading 3D printer firms that have made medical/dental markets a critical part of their product offerings and market direction.

    SmarTech believes that this report will provide invaluable guidance for 3D printing equipment and software companies, service providers, specialty chemical firms and  medical equipment firms.  We also think that it will prove to be required reading for investors in the 3D printing business as a whole.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One: The Business Case for 3D Printing in the Medical and Dental Sectors
    1.1 Progress In Medical/ Dental Sectors Rests In Rapid Advancement of 3D Printing Technology
    1.2 Importance of Customization for Medical and Dental Products
    1.3 The Role of “Prosumer” 3D Printers In Medical/Dental Markets
    1.4 Specialized 3D Printing Services Required for Medical/Dental Markets
    1.5 Opportunities for 3D Scanners and Scanning Equipment
    1.5.1 Dental Model Scanners
    1.5.2 Intra-Oral Scanners
    1.5.3 The Role of Medical Imaging In 3D-Printed Medical/Dental Markets
    1.6 Opportunities to Supply Materials Into the 3D-Printed Medical/Dental Market
    1.7 Opportunities In Medical/Dental Software
    1.8 Assessment for 3D Printing In Medical/Dental Markets by Geography
    1.9 Summary of Ten-Year Forecasts for 3D Printed Medical and Dental Markets

    Chapter Two: Medical and Dental Markets for 3D Printing
    2.1 Medical and Dental Modeling
    2.1.1 Understanding the Role Medical Models Have Played In the Industry
    2.1.2 3D Printing is Re-Inventing the Medical Model Product Category
    2.1.3 Medical Models Ultimate Value will be Determined by Health Insurance Providers and Government Agencies
    2.1.4 Isolating Real Opportunities In Medical Modeling
    2.1.5 Dental Modeling
    2.1.6 Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printing For Medical/Dental Modeling
    2.2 Orthopedic Implants
    2.2.1 Different Materials Used and Strategic Implications Moving Forward
    2.2.2 Adoption Is Driven by Applications that Offer Superior Performance and/or Lower Cost
    2.2.3 Craniomaxillofacial Implants
    2.2.4 Acetabular Cup Implants
    2.2.5 Other Orthopedic Implants
    2.2.6 Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printed Implants
    2.3 Medical Prosthetics
    2.3.1 Hearing Aids
    2.3.2 Prosthetic Fairings
    2.3.3 Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printed Prosthetics
    2.4 Medical Instruments
    2.4.1 Surgical Cutting Guides, Drill Guides, and Bespoke Tools
    2.4.2 Production of Medical Equipment Prototypes and Finished Products
    2.4.3 Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printed Medical Instruments
    2.5 Bio-Medical Scaffold Systems
    2.5.1 Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printed Bio-Medical Funding

    Chapter Three: Dental Markets for 3D Printing
    3.1 Dental Implants
    3.1.1 Crowns and Bridges
    3.1.2 Screws and Abutments
    3.1.3 Temporaries
    3.1.4 3D Printing will Outdo CNC Milling In the Long Run
    3.2 Dentures
    3.2.1 Partial Dentures
    3.2.2 Full Dentures
    3.2.3 3D Printing for Lost Wax Investments
    3.3 Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printed Dental Products

    Chapter Four: Key Firms to Watch for 3D Printing in the Medical and Dental Markets
    4.1 3D Systems
    4.2 Arcam
    4.3 Concept Laser
    4.4 DWS
    4.5 EnvisionTEC
    4.6 EOS
    4.7 Innovation MediTech
    4.8 Materialise
    4.9 Optomec
    4.10 Rapid Shape
    4.11 Renishaw
    4.12 SLM Solutions
    4.13 Solidscape
    4.14 Stratasys Ltd.

    Chapter Five: Summary of Ten-Year Forecasts
    5.1 Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printers Installed and Shipped In the Medical/Dental Sector
    5.2 Ten-year Forecasts of 3D Printing Software Expended Annually by the Medical/Dental Sector
    5.3 Ten-year Forecasts of 3D Printing Scanners Installed And Shipped Annually To The Medical/Dental Sector
    5.4 Ten-year Forecasts of 3D Printing Materials Consumed Annually By The Medical/Dental Sector
    About SmarTech Markets Publishing
    About the Analyst

    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit 1-1: Ten-Year Forecasts for Equipment, Materials, Software, Scanners
    Exhibit 1-2: Ten-Year Forecasts for the Value of Medical Applications
    Exhibit 1-3: Ten-Year Forecasts for the Value of Dental Applications
    Exhibit 1-4: Markets Summary
    Exhibit 2-1: Opportunities in 3D Printed Medical Models
    Exhibit 2-2: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed Medical Model Market
    Exhibit 2-3: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed Dental Model Market
    Exhibit 2-4: Beneficial Traits of 3D-Printed Orthopedic Implants
    Exhibit 2-5: Advantages of PEKK Over Titanium
    Exhibit 2-6: Other Orthopedic Implants Being Explored By 3D Printing
    Exhibit 2-7: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed Hip Implant Market
    Exhibit 2-8: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed Cranial/Facial Implant Market
    Exhibit 2-9: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed "Other" Implant Market
    Exhibit 2-10: Factors Limiting New Revenue Opportunities in Hearing Aids
    Exhibit 2-11: Benefits 3D Printing Can Bring To The Prosthetics Market
    Exhibit 2-12: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed Hearing Aid Shell Market
    Exhibit 2-13: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed Orthopedic Prosthetic Market
    Exhibit 2-14: Ten-Year Forecasts for 3D Printed Surgical Cutting Guides and Bespoke Tools Market
    Exhibit 2-15: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed Medical Hardware (Prototypes and Finished Parts) Market
    Exhibit 2-16: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed Bio-Medical Market
    Exhibit 3-1: Benefits of 3D Printing Temporaries Over CNC Milling
    Exhibit 3-2: Benefits of Producing Wax Printers
    Exhibit 3-3: Ten-Year Forecasts for the 3D Printed Dental Product Market
    Exhibit 5-1: 10 Year Forecasts For Metal Dental Printers
    Exhibit 5-2: 10 Year Forecasts For Plastic Dental Printers
    Exhibit 5-3: Ten-Year Forecasts for Metal Medical Printers
    Exhibit 5-4: Ten-Year Forecasts for Plastic Medical Printers
    Exhibit 5-5: Printer Summary
    Exhibit 5-6: Ten-Year Forecasts for Dental Software
    Exhibit 5-7: Ten-Year Forecasts for Medical Software
    Exhibit 5-8: 3D Printing Software Summary
    Exhibit 5-9: Ten-Year Forecasts for Dental Scanners
    Exhibit 5-10: Ten- Year Forecasts for Medical Scanners
    Exhibit 5-11: Ten-Year Forecast Summary of 3D Scanners Used In Medical and Dental 3D Printing
    Exhibit 5-12: Ten-Year Forecasts for Dental Materials Used In 3D Printing
    Exhibit 5-13: Ten-Year Forecasts for Medical Material for 3D Printing– Total Demand
    Exhibit 5-14: Ten-Year Forecasts for Plastic Medical Materials for 3D Printing
    Exhibit 5-15: Ten-Year Forecasts for Metal Medical Materials for 3D Printing
     

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Single User $1,995.00  
Group (up to 5 users) $2,995.00  
Enterprise $3,995.00  
REPORT # ST-004 PUBLISHED November 21, 2013
Personal 3D Printers: Market Forecast and Market Share Analysis: 2013-2022
CATEGORIES :
  • Emerging Electronics
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    This report is published by SmarTech Publishing and is available for purchase via NanoMarkets.

    Almost 70,000 personal 3D printers will be sold in 2013, with personal 3D printing being hailed by some as the “next big thing” -- almost as disruptive as the personal computing revolution itself.  Big name companies – Microsoft, Staples and UPS – are also making investments. But the other side of the 3D printing story is that it is not yet clear what 3D personal printing is good for and many suppliers of these machines are small companies with limited resources.

    With all this in mind this new report  provides the first thorough market analysis of the personal 3D printer space.  It offers an in-depth discussion of applications where we believe personal 3D printers can generate new business revenues and includes a ten-year (volume and value) forecasts of personal 3D printers with breakouts by application.  Also included in this report are 10-year projections of software, 3D scanners and services used in the personal 3D printer sector.

    The report also provides an assessment of the market shares of all the leading suppliers of personal 3D printers, along with a discussion of the strategies of the key firms influencing this market.  Likely long-term financing trends for the 3D personal printing sector are also discussed.

    This report will be invaluable to product marketing and business development executives in the 3D printing sector, as well as the investment community.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One: Personal 3D Printing:  Opportunities and Strategies
    1.1 Revenue Generation for Personal 3D Printing Firms: The Next Five Years
    1.2 Long-Term Opportunities for Personal 3D Printing Firms
    1.3 Evolution of Printing Services for Personal 3D Printing
    1.4 Opportunities for Software Companies in the Personal 3D Printing Space
    1.5 Ten Companies to Watch in the Personal 3D Printing Sector
    1.5.1 MakerBot/Stratasys
    1.5.2 3D Systems
    1.5.3 Beijing Tiertime
    1.5.4 Shapeways
    1.5.5 Amazon
    1.5.6 Staples
    1.5.7 UPS
    1.5.8 Microsoft
    1.5.9 Autodesk
    15.10 Kickstarter
    1.6 Summary of Ten-Year Forecasts of Personal 3D Printing Markets

    Chapter Two:  Emerging Markets for 3D Personal Printing
    2.2 Hype and Reality in Personal 3D Printing
    2.1 Current and Future Hobbyist Markets
    2.1.1 Factors Driving and Shaping the Hobbyist Market
    2.1.2 Likely 3D Price Trends for Personal 3D Printing
    2.1.3 10-Year Forecast of Personal 3D Printer Shipments: Hobbyists
    2.2 Small Scale Manufacturing and Home Businesses
    2.2.1 Which Small Businesses Will Use Personal 3D Printers:  A Roadmap
    2.2.2 Use of Personal 3D Printers in Developing Countries
    2.2.2 Likely Price Trends
    2.2.3 10-Year Forecast of Personal 3D Printer Shipments: Small Business
    2.3 Educational Markets
    2.3.1 Use of Personal 3D Printers by K-12 and Secondary Education
    2.3.2 3D Personal Printers in Universities and Colleges
    2.3.3 10-Year Forecast of Personal 3D Printer Shipments: Education
    2.4 Medical and Dental Markets for 3D Personal Printers
    2.4.1 Possible Uses of 3D Printers in Medicine and Dentistry
    2.4.2 10-Year Forecast of Personal 3D Printer Shipments: Medical and Dental
    2.5 Personal 3D Printing:  Derivative Markets
    2.5.1 10-Year Forecast of 3D Scanners for the 3D Personal Printing Sector
    2.5.2 10-Year Forecast of Software Expenditures by 3D Personal Printing
    2.5.3 10-Year Forecast of Service Revenue Generated by 3D Personal Printing
    2.6 Major Barriers to Adoption for 3D Printing
    2.7 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three:  Product and Technology Evolution for Personal 3D Printers
    3.1 Printing Technology for Personal 3D Printers:  Current Use and Future Trends
    3.1.1 Are Personal 3D Printers Ready for Prime Time?
    3.2 Major Suppliers of Personal 3D Printers
    3.2.1 Market Shares
    3.2.2 Key Strategies Employed by Personal 3D Printer Firms
    3.2.3 Financing Trends:  VCs, Strategic Investments and Crowdsourcing
    3.3 3D Printing Service Bureau Strategies for Personal 3D Printing
    3.3.1 Entry of large firms into the 3D Service Bureau Business
    3.4 Current and Future Personal 3D Printing Software Products
    3.4.1 Design and Modeling Software       
    3.4.2 Solid Modeling CAD
    3.4.3 3D Computer Graphics
    3.4.4 Scanning Software
    3.5 Supply Chain/Marketing Channel Evolution for the Personal 3D Printing Industry
    3.6 The Future of Open Source in 3D Printing    
    3.7 Key Points Made in this Section

    Acronyms
    About the Author

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Single User $3,495.00  
Advanced (up to 5 users) $4,495.00  
Enterprise $5,495.00  
REPORT # ST-003 PUBLISHED November 21, 2013
Markets for 3D Printing Materials: 2013-to-2022
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    This report is published by SmarTech Publishing and is available for purchase via NanoMarkets.

    After many years as a niche technology for rapid prototyping, 3D printing has suddenly emerged as manufacturing technology with a thousand uses spread across a very diverse user base.  Possible and actual users of 3D printers now include everyone from hobbyists to dentists to jewelers to giant aerospace firms.

    SmarTech sees these trends as creating an immediate opportunity in the materials space.  Each user group and each application needs its own materials set.  While 3D printing used to be primarily about ABS, PLA and some metals, it seems that hardly a day goes by without new materials being added to the 3D printing palette. 

    Change in the 3D printing materials sector is now occurring at multiple levels.  New materials such as novel alloys and even concrete are started to be printed.  And it is becoming clear that the roads to success in the 3D printing materials sector will depend on finely tuning materials offerings to the needs of each application.  This fine-tuning process will involve not just the type of material itself, but also material quality, and the selection of marketing channels and packaging.

    This report is the first industry analysis report to examine where the money will be made in the 3D printing materials.  For each major material, the report provides an assessment of its commercial potential, along with marketing prerogatives for key end-user sectors.  The report also provides an analysis and forecast of the materials requirements for all the major applications sectors in which 3D printing is being deployed.

    The ten-year forecasts presented in this report are in volume (kg) and value ($ million) terms and the report also provides an appraisal of the strategies of the key firms influencing this market.  This report will be invaluable to product marketing and business development executives in the 3D printing sector, as well as in the specialty chemicals sector.  It will also be required reading for serious investors in 3D printing markets.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Chapter One: Summary of Opportunities and Strategies
    1.1  3D Printing Materials:  Opportunity Analysis
    1.1.1 3D Printer Suppliers: Revenue Generation from Materials
    1.1.2  Specialty Chemical Firms: Opportunities in the 3D Printing Space
    1.1.3  3D Printing Services and 3D Printing Materials
    1.1.4   Recycling Opportunities
    1.2   The 3D Printing Materials Value Chain
    1.3   10 Firms to Watch in the 3D Printing Materials Space
    1.3.1   3D Systems
    1.3.2   Stratasys
    1.3.3   ExOne
    1.3.4   EnvisionTEC
    1.3.5   EOS
    1.3.6   CRP Technologies
    1.3.7   Oxford Performance Materials
    1.3.8   Arcam AB
    1.3.9   Arkema
    1.3.10   Bayer Material Sciences & SolidComposites GmbH
    1.4   Impact of Emerging 3D Printing Materials Standards
    1.5   The Need for Colored Materials
    1.6   Build and Support Materials
    1.7   Emergence of Multi-Material Systems
    1.8   R&D Trends in 3D Printing Materials
    1.9   Summary of Ten-Year Forecast of Materials Used by 3D Printing
    1.9.1   Summary of Forecasts by Application
    1.9.2   Summary of Forecasts by Type of Material
     
    Chapter Two: Plastics Used in 3D Printing: Commercialization Trends and Markets
    2.1   ABS
    2.1.1   History Favors ABS
    2.1.2   Future Innovations and Challenges in ABS
    2.1.3   ABS' Role in the Future of 3D Printing
    2.2   PLA
    2.2.1   Market Segments Where PLA Will Succeed Best as a 3D Printing Material
    2.2.2   Other Factors Shaping the Opportunities for PLA in the 3D Printing Industry
    2.3   Polyamide (PA)
    2.3.1   Current Use of PA in 3D Printing
    2.3.2   Future Development of PA for 3D Printing
    2.4   Polypropylene (PP)
    2.5   PEEK & PEKK
    2.6   Acrylics and Acrylates
    2.6.1   Current Position and Future of Acrylates
    2.6.2   Enhanced Acrylates
    2.7   Other Photopolymers
    2.8   Polystyrenes (PS)
    2.8.1   Environmental Concerns with Polystyrenes
    2.9   Polycarbonate (PC)
    2.10   Thermoplastic Polyurethanes (TPUs)
    2.10.1   Factors that Could Make TPUs Successful
    2.11   Other Plastics Usable in the 3D Printing
    2.12   Prices and Price Trends
    2.13   Biocompatibility, Recycling and Other Environmental Considerations
    2.14   Implications of Recent Industry Consolidation
    2.15   Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Metals Used in 3D Printing: Commercialization Trends and Markets
    3.1   The Most Likely Road For Metals Development
    3.1.1   Divergence from The Past
    3.1.2   Metal 3D Printing Is Best Characterized as a Diverse Collection of  Materials and Processes        
    3.2   Steel:  The Most Evolved Metal in 3D Printing
    3.2.1   Challenges for Stainless Steel Moving Forward
    3.3   Tool Steel
    3.4   Alloys
    3.5   Titanium
    3.6   Aluminum
    3.7   Nickel
    3.8   Cobalt-Chromium
    3.9   Copper
    3.10   Bronze
    3.11   Precious Metals
    3.11.1   Gold, Platinum, Palladium
    3.12   Provisions for Recycling of Precious Metals
    3.12.1   Innovation In Metal Powder Recycling
    3.13   Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four: Other Materials Used in 3D Printing: Commercialization Trends and Markets
    4.1   Other Materials
    4.2   Ceramics
    4.3.1   Jet Binder Glass Printing Offers Little Promise
    4.3.2   Polyamide-Based Glass Polymers are Glass’s Future In The 3D Printing Sector
    4.4   Epoxy
    4.5   Clay
    4.6   Sand
    4.6.1   Considerations for 3D Foundry Sand Demand
    4.7   Paper
    4.7.1   Limits to 3D Paper Printing Technology
    4.7.2   Implications on the 3D Prototyping Industry: Existing Players Must Emphasize Functional Prototypes  
    4.7.3   3D Paper Printing Will Do Great Things for the 3D Printing Industry as a Whole  
    4.8   Composites
    4.8.1   Strategic Impact of Composite Materials
    4.8.2   Limitations of Composites’ Molecular Orientation
    4.9   Medical and Biological Materials
    4.10   Food
    4.11   Concrete and Other Building Materials
    4.11.1   3D Concrete Printing
    4.12   Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Five: Applications and Ten-Year Forecasts for 3D Printing Materials     
    5.1   3D Material Forecasts Overview
    5.2   Personal 3D Printing Materials
    5.2.1   Types of Materials Used in Personal 3D Printing
    5.2.2   Impact of Material Price on Personal 3D Printing
    5.2.3   Supply Chain for Personal 3D Printing Materials
    5.2.4   Ten-Year Forecasts for Materials Used in Personal 3D Printing
    5.3   Materials for Industrial 3D Printing
    5.3.1   Materials Needs of Rapid Prototyping
    5.3.2   Materials Needs for Small-Scale Manufacturing
    5.3.3   Special Materials Requirements for 3D Printing in Automotive and Aerospace        
    5.3.4   Price Trends for 3D Printed Industrial Materials and their Impact
    5.3.5   Ten-Year Forecasts for Materials Used in Industrial 3D Printing
    5.4   Medical and Dental Materials
    5.4.1   Types of Materials Used in 3D Medical/Dental Printing
    5.4.2   Price Trends for Medical/Dental 3D Printing Materials and their Impact
    5.4.3   Ten-Year Forecasts for Materials Used in Medical/Dental 3D Printing
    5.4 Educational Markets for 3D Printed Materials
    5.4.1   3D Printing Materials Used by Educational Markets
    5.4.2   Ten-Year Forecasts for Materials Used in 3D Printing in Educational Institutions     
    5.5   3D Printed Materials Used in Architectural and Construction Markets
    5.5.1  3D Printing Materials for Architectural Modeling
    5.5.2 Materials for Printed Homes
    5.5.3 Ten-Year Forecasts for Materials Used for 3D Printing in the Architectural/Construction industry
    5.6    Service Bureau
    5.6.1   Materials Used at 3D Service Bureau Markets
    5.7   Military
     
    About SmarTech Markets Publishing
    About the Analyst
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
     
     
    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit 1-1: Limiting Factors to Developing Economies of Scale for 3D Printing Materials     
    Exhibit 1-2: Beneficial Factors for 3D Printer Manufacturer Producing Materials
    Exhibit 1-3: Roles of 3D Printing Companies’ Service Operations
    Exhibit 1-4: R&D Trends in Printing Materials
    Exhibit 1-5: Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printing Materials by Application Sector (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 1-6: Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printing Materials by Type of Materials ($US Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1:  ABS and PLA Comparison
    Exhibit 2-2: Reasons for PLA’s Adoption In the Education Sector
    Exhibit 2-3: Biocompatibility Specifications of Printable Plastics
    Exhibit 3-1: Current Uses of Iron/Steel Compounds
    Exhibit 4-1: Favorable properties of Ceramic Powders
    Exhibit 4-2: 3D Ceramics Materials Limitations, Solutions, and Potential Schedule  for Resolution
    Exhibit 4-3: Innovations In Mcor’s Selective Deposition Lamination Technology Size of printers
    Exhibit 4-4: Most Important Composite 3D Printing Materials
    Exhibit 4-5: Strategic Implications of Composites
    Exhibit 4-6: Benefits and Caveats of 3D Printing Artificial Bovine Meat
    Exhibit 5-1: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printing Material Prices ($/kg)
    Exhibit 5-2: Ten-Year Revenue Forecast for 3D Printing Materials, by Application ($US Millions)  
    Exhibit 5-3: Ten-Year Forecast of Total 3D Printing Materials Shipments, by Type of Material ($US Millions)     
    Exhibit 5-4: Factors That Will Protect Material Prices Over The Next Five Years
    Exhibit 5-5: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Capacity of Personal 3D Printer Installed Base      
    Exhibit 5-6: Ten-Year Forecasts of Personal 3D Printing Materials Shipments (Millions kgs)   
    Exhibit 5-7:  Ten-Year Forecasts of Personal 3D Printing Materials Market Share, by Type of Material   
    Exhibit 5-8: Ten-Year Forecasts of Personal 3D Printing Materials Shipments ($US Millions) 
    Exhibit 5-9: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Capacity of Rapid Manufacturing 3D Printer Installed Base           
    Exhibit 5-10: Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printing Materials Shipments to Rapid Manufacturing Sector (Millions kgs)        
    Exhibit 5-11: Ten-Year Forecasts of Market Share of Materials in Rapid Manufacturing, by Type of Material         
    Exhibit 5-12: Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printing Materials Shipments to Rapid Manufacturing Sector ($US Millions)      
    Exhibit 5-13: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Capacity of Auto Sector 3D Printer Installed Base
    Exhibit 5-14: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Auto Sector 3D Printing Materials Shipments (Millions kgs, except last row)   
    Exhibit 5-15: Ten-Year Forecasts of Market Share of Materials in Auto Sector, by Type of Material
    Exhibit 5-16: Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printing Material Shipments to Auto Sector ($US Millions) 
    Exhibit 5-17: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Capacity of Aeronautical Sector 3D Printer Installed Base          
    Exhibit 5-18: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Aeronautical Sector 3D Printing Materials Shipped (Millions kgs, except last row)     
    Exhibit 5-19: Ten-Year Forecasts of Market Share of 3D Printing Materials in Aeronautical Sector, by Type of Material 
    Exhibit 5-20: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Value of 3D Printing Materials Shipped to Aeronautical Sector ($US Millions)
    Exhibit 5-21: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Capacity of Medical/Dental 3D Printer Installed Base
    Exhibit 5-22: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Medical/Dental 3D Printing Materials (Millions kgs, except last row)     
    Exhibit 5-23: Ten-Year Forecasts of Market Share of 3D Printing Materials in Medical/Dental, by Type of Material         
    Exhibit 5-24: Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printing Materials Shipped to Medical/Dental Sector ($US Millions)           
    Exhibit 5-25: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Capacity of Education Sector 3D Printing Installed Base 
    Exhibit 5-26: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Education Sector 3D Printing Materials (Millions kgs, except final row)
    Exhibit 5-27: Ten-Year Forecasts of Market Share of 3D Printing Materials in Education Sector, by Type of Material      
    Exhibit 5-28: Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printing Materials Shipped to Education Sector ($US Millions)        
    Exhibit 5-29: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Capacity of Military 3D Printing Installed Base     
    Exhibit 5-30: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Military 3D Printing Materials Shipped (kgs)
    Exhibit 5-31: Ten-Year Forecasts of Market Share of 3D Printing Materials in  Military, by Type of Material        
    Exhibit 5-32: Ten-Year Forecasts of Total Value of 3D Printing Material Shipped to Military Sector ($US Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-657 PUBLISHED October 29, 2013
Worldwide Smart Coatings Markets: 2013-2020
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    Smart coatings change in response to external stimuli and are finding a fast growing number of applications in several industries including construction, automotive, medical, consumer electronic goods and the military.  NanoMarkets believes that these materials present a strong business case because of their unique functionality and their ability to be highly customized.  We think smart coatings will do especially well in medical, military and other applications, where quality and performance, rather than price, shape purchasing decisions.  Consumer markets where the customer is willing to pay a premium for functionality such as scratch resistance or enhanced energy efficiency will also be important.

    NanoMarkets commenced coverage of smart coatings in 2011.  As such it has a solid understanding of the dynamics of the smart coatings business and it brings this experience to this report.  The report covers all the major markets for smart coatings including energy, automotive, medical, electronics, textiles and military.   And it includes an assessment of the product/marketing strategies of key firms supplying smart coatings, as well as eight-year forecasts by applications sector and by type of coating.  These forecasts are both in volume and in value terms.

    This report also assesses the latest technical developments in the smart coatings space; smart coatings are becoming smarter and more biological, for example Based on the latest R&D and university research, we also examines future directions for smart coatings including important developments in manufacturing.  We believe that this report will provide guidance to coatings and other specialty chemical firms, as well as firms making production equipment, and others planning to make investments of all kinds in smart materials.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 A Generic Businescutive Summarys Case for Smart Coatings
    E.2 Summary of Key Commercial Opportunities for Smart Coatings
    E.2.1 Building Materials and Energy Efficiency
    E.2.2 Energy Generation
    E.2.3 Automotive and Marine
    E.2.4 Medical
    E.2.5 Electronics and Displays
    E.2.6 Textiles and Clothing
    E.2.7 Military
    E.3 Firms to Watch in the Smart Coatings Sector
    E.3.1 Established Manufacturers
    E.3.2 Emerging Players
    E.4 Barriers to Growth in the Smart Coatings Market
    E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Smart Coatings Market Forecasts

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to the Report
    1.1.1 Brief about Smart Coatings
    1.1.2 Improving Scope for Medical Applications
    1.1.3 Growing Scope for Military Applications
    1.1.4 Energy Applications to Receive a Boost
    1.1.5 Demand from the Transportation Sector Likely to Revive
    1.1.6  Electronic Industry Represents a New and Potential Application Area
    1.1.7 Construction Applications Continue to be Affected by Premium Pricing and Current Economic Conditions
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Smart Coatings:  Technical and Product Trends
    2.1 Self-Assembling, Self-Organizing and Self-Stratifying Coatings
    2.1.1 Key Commercial Products and Product Trends
    2.1.2 R&D Directions in Self-Assembling Coatings
    2.2 Self-Cleaning Coatings
    2.2.1 Products and Trends for Self-Cleaning Glass
    2.2.2 Other Self-Cleaning Products and Trends
    2.3 Self-Repairing and Self-Healing Coatings
    2.3.1 Current and Future Products
    2.3.2 Main R&D Trends in Self-Healing Coatings
    2.4 Corrosion-Resistant and Wear-Resistant Coatings
    2.4.1 How Smart Coatings are Being Used to Enhance Corrosion and Wear Resistance
    2.4.2 Key Products in this Space
    2.5 Antimicrobial and Other Bioactive Coatings
    2.5.1 How Smart Materials are Enhancing Antimicrobial and other Bioactive Coatings
    Antibacterial and antifungal coatings
    2.5.2 Main R&D Trends in Antimicrobial Coatings
    2.6 Pressure-Responsive Smart Coatings
    2.6.1 Key Products and Product Trends
    2.7 Smart Optical Coatings
    2.7.1 Self-Dimming Coatings
    2.7.2 Color-Shifting Coatings
    2.7.3 Other Smart Optical Coatings
    2.8 Next-Generation Smart Coatings:  New Functionality
    2.8.1 Impact of Nanotechnology
    2.8.2 Potential for the Use of New Materials
    2.9 Manufacturing Innovations Impacting the Smart Coatings Sector
    2.10 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Smart Coatings:  Opportunity Analysis and Market Forecast
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    3.1.1 Forecasting Philosophy
    3.1.2 Sources of Data
    3.1.3 Economic Assumptions
    3.1.4 Pricing Assumptions
    3.1.5 Alternative Scenarios

    3.2 Smart Coatings Used in Building Materials and Energy Efficiency Products
    3.2.1 Self-Healing Paints
    3.2.2 Self-Dimming and Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.2.3 Anti-Corrosion Coatings
    3.3.4 Forecast for Smart Coatings in the Construction Segment by Application and Material Type

    3.3 Energy Generation
    3.3.1 Photovoltaics – Cleaner Glass and Anti-Reflective Coatings
    3.3.2 Fuel Cells, Batteries, and Smart Coatings
    3.3.3 Smart Coatings for Wind and Gas Turbines
    3.3.4 Smart Coatings for Removal of Oil Slicks
    3.3.5 Forecast for Smart Coatings in the Energy Generation Segment by Application and Material Type

    3.4 Automotive, Marine and Other Transportation Markets
    3.4.1 Corrosion Sensing and Corrosion Control
    3.4.2 Self-Dimming, Self-Cleaning, and Self-De-icing Windows and Mirrors
    3.4.3 Self-Repairing Body Coatings
    3.4.4 Anti-Fouling Applications
    3.4.5 Smart Coatings in Braking and Suspension Systems
    3.4.6 Smart Coatings for Lubricants
    3.4.7 Smart Tires
    3.4.8 Forecast for Smart Coatings in the Transportation Segment by Application and Material Type

    3.5 Medical and Dental Applications for Smart Coatings
    3.5.1 Drug Delivery Coatings
    3.5.2 Anti-Microbial and Anti-Inflammatory Coatings
    3.5.3 Diagnostic Sensing Coatings
    3.5.4 Medical Uniforms and Medical Monitoring Garments
    3.5.5 Forecast for Smart Coatings in the Medical Segment by Application and Material Type

    3.6 Consumer Electronics and Computers
    3.6.1 Anti-Scratch Materials
    3.6.2 Touch Screens
    3.6.3 Pressure-Sensing and Haptic Coatings
    3.6.4 Self-Cleaning Displays
    3.6.5 Forecast for Smart Coatings in the Consumer Electronic Segment by Application and Material Type

    3.7 Smart Textiles and Clothing
    3.7.1 Environmentally Responsive Textiles
    3.7.2 Self-Cleaning Carpets and Fabrics
    3.7.3 Fire-Retardant Textiles and Garments
    3.7.4 Forecast for Smart Polymers in Smart Textiles by Application and Material Type

    3.8 Military and Domestic Security Markets for Smart Coatings
    3.8.1 Camouflage
    3.8.2 Smart Coatings for the Detection of Toxic Substances
    3.8.3 Uniforms
    3.8.4 Naval Anti-Fouling
    3.8.5 Forecast for Smart Coatings in the Military Segment by Application and Material Type

    3.9 Summary Forecasts
    3.9.1 Summary by Application
    3.9.2 Summary by Type of Material

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit 2-1: Notable Companies and Products in the Self-Assembling, Self-Organizing and  Self-Stratifying Segment 
    Exhibit 2-2: Major Research Projects on Self-Assembling and Self-Stratifying Coatings and Their Future Impact
    Exhibit 2-3: Notable Companies, Products, and Trends in the Self-Cleaning Glass Segment 
    Exhibit 2-4: Notable Companies, Products, and Trends in the Self-cleaning Surfaces Segment 
    Exhibit 2-5: Notable Companies, Products and Trends in the Self-healing and Self-repairing Segment 
    Exhibit 2-6: Major Research Initiatives and Trends in Self-Healing and Self-Repairing Coating Segment 
    Exhibit 2-7: Notable Companies, Products, and Trends in the Corrosion and Wear Resistant Segment 
    Exhibit 2-8: Antimicrobial Coating Products and Their Applicability 
    Exhibit 2-9: Major Research Projects and Trends in the Antimicrobial/Bioactive Coatings Segment 
    Exhibit 2-10: Key Trends in Pressure-Responsive Coatings 
    Exhibit 3-1: Smart Coating Pricing Assumptions for Key Applications 
    Exhibit 3-2: Approximate Share of Different Types of Smart Coatings in Each Application 
    Exhibit 3-3: Potential Applications for Smart Coatings in the Building Construction Markets 
    Exhibit 3-4: Eight-Year Forecast of Electrochromic Window Coatings in the Construction Sector  ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 3-5: Eight-Year Forecast of Thermochromic Window Film in the Construction Sector ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 3-6: Eight-Year Forecast of Photochromic Window Film in the Construction Sector   ($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 3-7: Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Cleaning Coatings in the Construction Sector 
    Exhibit 3-8: Eight-Year Forecast of Corrosion-Prevention Coatings in the Construction Sector 
    Exhibit 3-9: Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Healing Coatings in the Construction Sector 
    Exhibit 3-10: Potential of Smart Coatings in Key Energy Generation Applications 
    Exhibit 3-11: Eight-Year Forecast of Fuel-Cell Coatings in the Energy Generation Sector 
    Exhibit 3-12: Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Cleaning Coatings Used in Solar Energy Applications 
    Exhibit 3-13: Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Cleaning/Corrosion-Prevention Coatings used in Wind Energy Applications 
    Exhibit 3-14: Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Coatings for Oil Slick Removal 
    Exhibit 3-15: Potential of Smart Coatings in Key Automobile Applications 
    Exhibit 3-16: Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Healing Coatings for Automotive Applications 
    Exhibit 3-17:  Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Dimming Coatings for Transportation Applications 
    Exhibit 3-18 Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Sensing Coatings used in Aircraft 
    Exhibit 3-19: Eight-Year Forecast of Antifouling Coatings for Marine Applications 
    Exhibit 3-20: Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Lubricant Coatings for Automotive Applications 
    Exhibit 3-21: Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Tire Coatings for Automotive Applications 
    Exhibit 3-22: Potential of Smart Coatings in Key Medical Applications 
    Exhibit 3-23: Eight-Year Forecast of Drug-Delivery Coatings 
    Exhibit 3-24: Eight-Year Forecast of Antimicrobial Coatings in Medical Applications 
    Exhibit 3-25:  Eight-Year Forecast of Medical Uniform Coatings 
    Exhibit 3-26: Potential of Smart Coatings in Key Consumer Electronics Applications 
    Exhibit 3-27: Eight-Year Forecast of Anti-Scratch Coatings for Consumer Electronics Applications 
    Exhibit 3-28: Eight-Year Forecast of Touch-Screen Coatings for Consumer Electronics Applications 
    Exhibit 3-29: Eight-Year Forecast of Pressure-Sensing Coatings for Consumer Electronics Applications 
    Exhibit 3-30: Potential of Smart Coatings in Key Textile and Clothing Applications  
    Exhibit 3-31: Eight-Year Forecast of Environmentally Responsive Textile Coatings 
    Exhibit 3-32: Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Cleaning Textile Coatings
    Exhibit 3-33: Eight-Year Forecast of Flame-Retardant Textile Coatings 
    Exhibit 3-34: Eight-Year Forecast of Corrosion-Resistant Coatings for Military Applications 
    Exhibit 3-35: Eight-Year Forecast of Camouflage Coatings for Military Applications 
    Exhibit 3-36: Eight-Year Forecast of Biosensing Coatings for Military Applications 
    Exhibit 3-37: Eight-Year Forecast of  Smart Coatings for Military Uniforms (other than camouflage coatings) 
    Exhibit 3-38: Eight-Year Forecast of Naval Antifouling Coatings 
    Exhibit 3-39: Eight-Year Revenue Forecast for Smart Coatings by Industry and Coating Type ($ Millions) 
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-655 PUBLISHED October 22, 2013
Worldwide Medical Ceramics Markets: 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    NanoMarkets believes that medical ceramics represents a major opportunity in the medical materials market over the next few years.  They have already established themselves in orthopedic and dental implants; providing a multitude of patients with problem free bone and tooth replacements.  Increasingly, prostheses for hip replacement consist of metal ceramic composites. NanoMarkets also believes that bioceramics and their metal composites have a great potential to heal long segmental bone defects and that in the future, orthopedic implants will rely on scaffold-guided bone tissue.

    The primary goal of this report is to identify the market opportunities in the medical ceramics sector over the next eight years.  This report not only includes a granular forecast and analysis of the more established medical ceramics markets, but also gives a comprehensive analysis of medical nano-ceramics especially in terms of enhancing the healing properties of implantable materials.

    This report discusses the commercial aspects of all the current trends in medical ceramics and the numerous applications in which they can be used.  The report also profiles key suppliers and analyzes the complete supply chain for medical ceramics.  For the firms covered we discuss their strategies and needs along with their strengths and weaknesses.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary

    E.1 Opportunities in the Medical Device and Implant Segment
    E.1.1 Growing Market for Prostheses and Bone Replacements Showcases a Multitude of Opportunities for Ceramics
    E.1.2 New Production Methods Improve the Scope of Medical Ceramic Applications
    E.1.3 Strong Potential of Bioactive Ceramic Coatings and Related Composites
    E.1.4 Future Advances in Piezoceramics and Nanoceramics
    E.2 Opportunities for the Healthcare Segment
    E.2.1 Medical Ceramics in Orthopedics and Dentistry to Receive Significant Boost
    E.2.2 Outlook for the Bone Regeneration Market and Scaffold-Guided Tissue Engineering
    E.2.3 Injectable Ceramics to Expand the Regenerative Market for Medical Ceramics
    E.3 Opportunities for Materials Firms
    E.3.1 Cost-effective Large-Scale Production of High Quality Materials Is the Key to Success
    E.3.2 Factors Affecting Medical Ceramic Manufacturers
    E.4 Firms to Watch in Medical Ceramics
    E.4.1 Orthopedic Implant Manufacturers
    E.4.2 Dental Implant Manufacturers
    E.4.3 Medical Ceramic Materials Manufacturers and Injectable Ceramic Solution Providers
    E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Medical Ceramics
     
    Chapter One: Introduction

    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Two Principal Sectors of the Medical Ceramics Market
    1.1.2 Implantable Bioceramics Market Dominated by Tooth and Bone Replacements
    1.1.3 Wide Use Of Ceramics In Biomedical Equipment
    1.1.4 Market Opportunities for Implantable Bioceramics Materials
    1.1.5 Nanoceramic Composites: Promising but Risky
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Information Sources and Methodology for This Report
    1.4 Plan of This Report
     
    Chapter Two: Medical Ceramics: Current Use and Major Technology Trends

    2.1 Ceramic Composites as Dental and Orthopedic Implants: Key Medical-Related Trends
    2.1.1 Ceramic Compositions
    2.1.2 New Production Methods for Orthopedic and Dental Implants in Medical Applications
    2.1.3 Ceramic Injection Molding Produces Small, High-Precision and Intricate Implants
    2.1.4 Bioactive Ceramic Coatings
    2.1.5 Calcium Phosphate Coatings
    2.1.6 Hydroxyapatite (HA) Coatings
    2.1.7 Glass Ceramic Coatings
    2.1.8 Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings
    2.2 Alumina and Zirconia Ceramics
    2.3 Predominantly Glass and Partially Filled Glass Ceramics
    2.4 Future Advances in Piezoceramics and Sensors
    2.5 Current and Future Applications of Medical Nanoceramics
    2.6 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Application and Markets for Medical Ceramics

    3.1 Major Factors Impacting the Medical Ceramics Market
    3.1.1 Clinical Trials
    3.1.2 Environmental Regulations
    3.1.3 Intellectual Property Issues
    3.1.4 Globalization and Trade Barriers
    3.1.5 Research and Development
    3.2 Medical Ceramics in Orthopedics
    3.2.1 Total Hip and Joint Replacements
    3.2.2 Artificial Joints and Bioglass Implants
    3.2.3 Scaffold-Guided Tissue Engineering
    3.2.4 Other Orthopedic Applications
    3.2.5 Pricing and Forecast Assumptions
    3.2.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Medical Ceramics in Orthopedics, by Material and Medical Procedure
    3.2.7 Notable Companies and Other Organizations Influencing the Use of Ceramics in Orthopedics
    3.3 Medical Ceramics in Dentistry
    3.3.1 Main Applications for Medical Ceramics in Dentistry
    3.3.2 Eight-Year Forecast of Medical Ceramics in Dentistry by Material and Dental Procedure
    3.3.3 Notable Companies and Other Organizations Influencing the Use of Ceramics in Dentistry
    3.4 Medical Ceramics in Medical Equipment
    3.4.1 Surgical Equipment
    3.4.2 Diagnostic Equipment
    3.4.3 Ceramics in Implantable Electronic Devices
    3.4.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Medical Equipment by Material and Equipment Type
    3.4.5 Notable Companies and Other Organizations Influencing the Use of Ceramics in Medical Equipment
    3.5 Injectable Ceramics and Ceramic Composites for In-Vivo Regeneration of Hard and Soft Tissues
    3.5.1 Eight-Year Forecast of Medical Ceramics in Regeneration Procedures
    3.5.2 Notable Companies and Other Organizations Influencing the Use of Ceramics in Regeneration Procedures

    Chapter Four: Summary of Forecasts and Geographical Analysis

    4.1 Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts
    4.1.1 Summary Forecast by Procedure
    4.1.2 Summary Forecast by Type of Equipment/Implant
    4.1.3 Summary Forecast by Type of Medical Ceramic Material
    4.2 Market for Medical Ceramics in the U.S.
    4.2.1 Regulatory Environment
    4.2.2 Trends and Opportunities
    4.2.3 Eight-Year Forecast of the U.S. Medical Ceramic Market
    4.3 Market for Medical Ceramics in Europe
    4.3.1 Regulatory Environment
    4.3.2 Trends and Opportunities
    4.3.3 Eight-Year Forecast of the European Market for Medical Ceramics
    4.4 Market for Medical Ceramics in Japan
    4.4.1 Regulatory Environment
    4.4.2 Trends and Opportunities
    4.4.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Markets for Medical Ceramics in Japan
    4.5 Market for Medical Ceramics in China
    4.5.1 Regulatory Environment
    4.5.2 Trends and Opportunities
    4.5.3 Eight-Year Forecast of the Medical Ceramic Market in China
    4.6 Other Notable National and Regional Markets for Medical Ceramics
    4.6.1 Eight-Year Forecast of the Medical Ceramic Market in Other Parts of the World
     
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
     
    About the Author

     

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Key Strengths and Weaknesses of Major Orthopedic Implant Manufacturers
    Exhibit E-2: Eight-Year Forecast of the Medical Ceramics Market (Global)
    Exhibit 2-1: Biomedical Applications for Bioceramics
    Exhibit 2-2: Factors Favoring the Global Medical Ceramics Industry
    Exhibit 2-3: Key Bioceramic Coatings and their Future Potential
    Exhibit 3-1: Clinical Trials and Their Impact on Ceramics
    Exhibit 3-2: Key Intellectual Property Issues
    Exhibit 3-3: Major Medical Ceramics Manufacturers and their Key Strengths
    Exhibit 3-4: Key Medical Ceramics for Orthopedic Applications, Major Benefits, and Future Outlook
    Exhibit 3-5: Ceramic Material Pricing Assumptions
    Exhibit 3-6: End-Product Cost and Medical Ceramic Content Estimates
    Exhibit 3-7: Approximate Share of the Market for Different Ceramic Materials in Each Application
    Exhibit 3-8: Eight-Year Forecast of Ceramics in Conventional Hip Implants, by Ceramic and Implant Type
    Exhibit 3-9: Eight-Year Forecast of Ceramics in Conventional Knee Implants, by Ceramic and Implant Type
    Exhibit 3-10: Eight-Year Forecast of Ceramics in Crowns and Bridges, by Material and Equipment Type
    Exhibit 3-11: Eight-Year Forecast of Ceramics in Dental Implants, by Material
    Exhibit 3-12: Key Piezoceramic-based Diagnostic Equipment and Their Potential Benefits
    Exhibit 3-13: Eight-Year Forecast of Ceramics in Surgical Equipment, by  Equipment Type
    Exhibit 3-14: Eight-Year Forecast of Piezoceramics in Diagnostic Equipment, by Equipment Type
    Exhibit 3-15: Eight-Year Forecast of Ceramics in Implantable Electronic Devices, by  Equipment Type
    Exhibit 3-16: Eight-Year Forecast of Ceramics in Regenerative Applications
    Exhibit 4-1: Eight-Year Revenue Forecast for Medical Ceramics by Procedure (Global)
    Exhibit 4-2: Eight-Year Revenue Forecast for Medical Ceramics by Equipment/Implant Type (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-3: Global Eight-Year Revenue Forecast for Medical Ceramics by Material Type (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-4: Global Eight-Year Volume Forecast for Medical Ceramics by Material Type (Metric Tons)
    Exhibit 4-5: Recent Launches of Ceramic-based Medical Devices in the U.S.
    Exhibit 4-6: Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Ceramics in the U.S. (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-7: Recent Launches of Ceramic-based Medical Devices in Europe
    Exhibit 4-8: Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Ceramics in Europe (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-9: Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Ceramics in Japan (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-10: Recent Launches of Ceramic-based Medical Devices in the Asian Region
    Exhibit 4-11: Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Ceramics in China (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-12: Eight-Year Forecast of the Medical Ceramics Market in the Rest of the World (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-13: Eight-Year Medical Ceramics Summary Revenue Forecast by County/Region (US$ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-647 PUBLISHED September 23, 2013
Market Opportunities for Quantum Dots in Lighting and Displays
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Emerging Electronics
  • SUMMARY

    This new NanoMarkets report provides an in depth market analysis of the opportunities emerging within the field of quantum dots (QDs), examining the latest products, strategies and technical developments in electronics applications for these emerging materials.  Within the report we assess how QDs are likely to penetrate addressable markets in lighting and display applications and along what time horizon.  We also examine the technology hurdles facing QDs broader adoption and how the industry will resolve them.  The report also evaluates the potential of QDs vs competing technologies and provides NanoMarkets opinions on how well QDs will fare.

    The report also includes NanoMarkets’ assessments of the strategies of leading firms active in the QD space with attention paid as to which are the companies to watch in the market.   In addition, detailed and granular forecasts of QD shipments in volume and value terms and by application will be provided.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Key Opportunities for Quantum Dots
    E.1.1 Display Backlighting
    E.1.2 Direct-Emission QD Displays
    E.1.3 QD Lighting
    E.2 Key QD Material Suppliers to Watch
    E.2.1 Key Display Industry-Focused Suppliers
    E.2.2 Key Lighting Industry-Focused Suppliers
    E.2.3 Established Component Suppliers
    E.2.4 Original Equipment Manufacturers
    E.3 QD Display and Lighting Roadmaps
    E.3.1 QD Display Roadmap
    E.3.2 QD Lighting Roadmap
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of QDs in Lighting and Displays

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Quantum Dots: The Key Markets
    1.1.1 QD TVs Emerge, While QD-Based Smartphones and Laptops Have Yet to Gain Commercial Acceptance
    1.1.2 QD-Based Solid-State Lighting on the Verge of Commercialization, but Little Impact in Other Lighting Categories
    1.1.3 QD Material Suppliers Likely to Benefit in the Mid-Term
    1.1.4 Technology Gaps in Current-Generation QD Materials
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology and Information Sources for this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Quantum Dot Technology Trends Impacting the Lighting and Display Markets
    2.1 Important Performance Trends
    2.1.1 Color Range
    2.1.2 Power Consumption
    2.1.3 Lifetime
    2.2 Materials Options and Long-Term Materials Trends for Commercial QD Products
    2.2.1 Alleviating the Shortage of QD Materials
    2.2.2 Lower-Cost Fabrication Approaches for QDs
    2.3 Regulations and the Environment
    2.3.1 Environmental Issues and the Potential Toxicity of QDs
    2.3.2 Regulatory Hurdles
    2.4 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Applications for Quantum Dots in Displays and Lighting
    3.1 Display Applications for QDs
    3.1.1 Key Factors Promoting and Retarding the Use of QDs in Displays
    3.1.2 QD-Enhanced LED Display Backlighting
    3.1.3 Complete Replacement of LEDs in TV/Monitor Backlighting
    3.1.4 How will QDs Compete with OLEDs in the Display Space
    3.1.5 QD Displays in the Mobile Display Space?
    3.1.6 Potential Uses for QDs in Flexible Displays
    3.2 Lighting Applications for QDs
    3.2.1 Can QDs Make Lighting More Energy Efficient?
    3.2.2 Will QDs be Used in Smart Lighting to Enhance Mood, Health, and Job Performance?
    3.2.3 QDs in the LED Phosphor Sector
    3.2.4 How will QDs Compete with OLED Lighting?
    3.3 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Four:  Eight-Year Forecasts of Quantum Dots in Displays and Lighting
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology and Objectives
    4.1.1 Scope of the Forecast
    4.1.2 Pricing Assumptions
    4.1.3 Other Assumptions
    4.1.4 Alternative Scenarios
    4.2 Forecasts for QDs in Displays by Display Type
    4.2.1 QD-Backlit LCD Televisions
    4.2.2 Other QD-Backlit Displays
    4.2.3 Direct-Emission QD Displays
    4.2.4 Other Types of QD Displays
    4.3 Forecasts for QDs in Lighting by Lighting Type
    4.3.1 Energy-Efficient Lighting
    4.3.2 Mood-, Health- and Performance-Enhancing Lighting
    4.4 Summary Forecasts for QDs in Display and Lighting Applications
    4.4.1 Eight-Year Revenue Forecast for QDs in Displays and Lighting by Major Product Category
    4.4.2 Eight-Year Volume Forecast for QDs in Displays and Lighting by Major Product Category
    4.5 Eight Year Forecast of QD-Enhanced Products
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Commercial Products Launched in Association with QD Vision
    Exhibit E-2: Eight-Year Revenue Forecast for QDs by Major Product Category ( US $Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Key Performance Properties, Applications, and Consumer Benefits of QDs
    Exhibit 2-2: Key QD Technologies and Future Outlook
    Exhibit 2-3: Current Status and Future Trends for QD Materials and Fabrication Options
    Exhibit 2-4: Key Concerns of the QD Industry and Probable Solutions
    Exhibit 3-1: Factors Working in Favor of QD Displays
    Exhibit 3-2: Factors Retarding the Adoption of QD Displays
    Exhibit 3-3: Highlights of QD Display Technology in Commercial Setting
    Exhibit 3-4: QD Strategies and Established Technologies
    Exhibit 3-5: Technology Suitability Under Different Scenarios
    Exhibit 3-6: Factors Impacting the Potential of QDs to Displace OLEDs
    Exhibit 3-7: Notable High-Performance TV Displays Based on Nanotechnology
    Exhibit 3-8: Notable Small Displays Based On Nanotechnology
    Exhibit 3-9: Status of QD Technology in Other Notable Display Segments
    Exhibit 3-10: Lighting Source Comparison
    Exhibit 3-11: Notable QD Research in the Lighting Segment
    Exhibit 3-12: Lighting Technology Comparison
    Exhibit 4-1: Product-wise Estimation of QD Material Content
    Exhibit 4-2: Eight-Year Forecast of Quantum Dots Used In Backlit LCD Displays: QD Backlit LCDTVs
    Exhibit 4-3: Forecast of Quantum Dots Used In Smartphones
    Exhibit 4-4: Forecast of Quantum Dots Used In Tablets
    Exhibit 4-5: Forecast of Quantum Dots Used In Laptop Computers
    Exhibit 4-6: Forecast of QDs Used In Monitors for Desktop Computers
    Exhibit 4-7: Forecast of Quantum Dots Used in  Large Direct-Emission Displays
    Exhibit 4-8: Forecast of Quantum Dots Used In Small Direct-Emission Displays
    Exhibit 4-9: Forecast of Quantum Dots Used In Flexible Displays
    Exhibit 4-10: Forecast of Quantum Dots-based Energy-Efficient Lighting
    Exhibit 4-11: Forecast of Quantum Dot-based Smart Lighting
    Exhibit 4-12: Eight-Year Revenue Forecast for QDs by Major Product Category
    Exhibit 4-13: Eight-Year Volume Forecast for QDs by Major Product Category (kilograms)
    Exhibit 4-14:  Value of Display and Lighting Products Using QDs (US $Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-651 PUBLISHED September 16, 2013
Worldwide Medical Polymer Markets: 2013-2020
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    NanoMarkets believes that medical polymers represents a major opportunity in the medical materials market over the next few years.   Several factors are leading to growth in this market.  Perhaps the most obvious is the aging of the population in developed nations is expanding the addressable market for polymer implants.  Many polymer implants are specifically intended to assist elder patients. 

    Opportunity in this market has also expanded because the latest technical developments in medical polymers can fine tune implant capabilities, enable better fits for implants, and increased biocompatibility.  Polymer structures can also now substitute for cartilage or enable doctors to grow a patient’s tissue for transplants.

    At the same time the new legal protections that followed the silicone breast implant debacle have considerably reduced the risk in the medical polymer space.  And as a result of all of these factors, the medical polymer business has taken off, with the emergence of new start ups and plenty of M&A activity.

    With all that is happening in this space, NanoMarkets is publishing a report that identifies current and future opportunities in the medical polymers space and provides guidance on the technical and regulatory framework in which these opportunities are arising.  As with all NanoMarkets reports in the medical materials field, this report includes a  granular eight-year forecast and also profiles key suppliers and analyzes the complete supply chain for medical polymers.  For the firms covered we discuss their strategies and needs along with their strengths and weaknesses.  Finally, the report provides an analysis of the market for medical polymers in various important country-specific markets.

    Readers of this report will gain the following:

    • An analytical review of polymers used for medical applications, including developing implants, diagnostic systems, and hospital labware.

    • Knowledge on current technical and market trends, including general market drivers for improvement in the healthcare sector, polymer production, and evaluation for clinical approval.

    • An understanding of key medical products and their future implications.

    • A pin-pointed analysis of the changing dynamics of polymer producers.

    • Eight–year forecasts based on expected market growth.

    • A brief technological road map for understanding industry growth.

    • Profiles of major companies operating as manufacturers of medical polymers.

    • Insight into important geographical locations pertaining to polymer and healthcare sectors.

    • Information on the size of the medical polymer market in developed nations and the fast-growing economies in Asia, such as China and India.

    • Details of the regulatory requirements of these countries for producing high-quality, medically approved polymers and their use in various applications.

    • Help in making business decisions for venturing into the medical polymer market.

    • Descriptive and distinctive graphics, along with concise, tabular analyses of various domains.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Opportunities in the Medical Device Market
    E.2 Opportunities for the Plastics Industry
    E.3 Firms and Strategies to Watch in the Medical Polymer Market
    E.3.1 Bayer MaterialScience
    E.3.2 Celanese
    E.3.3 Dow Corning
    E.3.4 Dow Chemical
    E.3.5 DSM
    E.3.6 DuPont
    E.3.7 Eastman Chemical
    E.3.8 Evonik
    E.3.9 Solvay
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of the Medical Polymer Market

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Boom in Thermoplastic Elastomers (TPES) and Engineered Plastics (Super Specialty Plastics)
    1.1.2 Rise of Degradable Polymers
    1.1.3 Important Points for Manufacturers
    1.2 Scope and Objectives of this Report
    1.3 Methodology and Information Sources
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Commercial Trends in Medical Polymers
    2.1 Generic Advantages and Disadvantages of Polymers for Medical Applications
    2.1.1 Advantages of Polymers in Medical Applications
    2.1.2 Disadvantages of Polymers in Medical Applications
    2.1.3 Replacement of Metals with Polymers in Medical Devices
    2.2 Thermoplastics (PMMA, PLA, PGA, PP, PEEK, Polycarbonates)
    2.2.1 Uses of Thermoplastics in Medical Applications
    2.2.2 Main Suppliers of Thermoplastics for Medical Applications
    2.3 Polyethylene (PE)
    2.3.1 Uses of PE in Medical Applications
    2.3.2 Main Suppliers of PE for Medical Applications
    2.4 Polystyrene
    2.4.1 Uses of Polystyrene and Styrenics in Medical Applications
    2.4.2 Main Suppliers of PS for Medical Applications
    2.5 Polyvinyl Chloride
    2.5.1 Uses of PVC in Medical Applications
    2.5.2 Main Suppliers of PVC for Medical Applications
    2.6 Nylon
    2.6.1 Uses of Nylon in Medical Applications
    2.6.2 Main Suppliers of Nylon for Medical Applications
    2.7 Other Polymers for Medical Applications
    2.8 Role of Bioplastics in Medical Applications
    2.9 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Applications for Medical Polymers
    3.1 Pricing and Forecast Assumptions
    3.1.1 Explanation of Polymer Pricing
    3.1.2 Use of Medical Polymers in Different Applications
    3.2 Medical Devices and Implants
    3.2.1 Current and Future Use of Polymers
    3.2.2 Regenerative Medicine and Orthopedic Implants
    3.2.3 Contact Lenses and Lens Implants
    3.2.4 Implantable Defibrillators and Related Devices
    3.2.5 Breast Implants
    3.2.6 Conductive Polymer Neural Implants
    3.2.7 Blood Filters
    3.2.8 Other Medical Devices Using Polymers
    3.3 Eight-Year Forecast of Polymers in Implants by Polymer and Implant Type
    3.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Polymers in Non-Implantable Devices by Polymer and Device Type
    3.4.1 Diagnostic Systems
    3.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Polymers in Diagnostic Systems by Polymer and Device Type
    3.5.1 Laboratory and Surgical Accessories and Disposables
    3.5.2 Surgical Screws, Nails and Plates
    3.5.3 Catheters and Tubing
    3.5.4 Surgical Gloves
    3.5.5 Sutures and Shunts
    3.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Polymers in Diagnostic Systems by Polymer and Device Type
    3.7 Summary of Forecasts of Medical Polymers
    3.7.1 Summary Forecast of Medical Polymers by Application
    3.8 Summary Forecast of Medical Polymers by Polymer Type
    3.9 Key Points in this Chapter

    Chapter Four: National Markets and Regulatory Factors
    4.1 Generic Policy Issues Raised by Polymer Medical Devices
    4.1.1 Safety Issues Related to Polymer Devices
    4.1.2 Problems of Waste Disposal and Management in Medical Polymer Manufacturing
    4.1.3 Healthcare Issues and an Aging Population
    4.1.4 Geographical Distribution of the Markets
    4.2 The Medical Polymer Market in the United States
    4.2.1 Medical Polymers and the Biomaterials Access Assurance Act of 1998
    4.2.2 Impact of “Obamacare”
    4.2.3 Role and Impact of the FDA
    4.2.4 Analysis of the Market for Medical Polymers in the U.S.
    4.2.5 Eight-Year Forecasts for Medical Polymers in the U.S.
    4.3 The Medical Polymer Market in Europe
    4.3.1 Role and Impact of the European Commission and Other Regulatory Authorities in the European Union
    4.3.2 National Regulations and Regulatory Agencies Impacting Medical Polymer Markets in the EU
    4.3.3 Analysis of the Market for Medical Polymers in Europe
    4.3.4 Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Polymers in Europe
    4.4 The Medical Polymer Market in Japan
    4.4.1 National Laws and Regulations Impacting the Medical Polymer Market in Japan
    4.4.2 Analysis of Market for Medical Polymers in Japan
    4.4.3 Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Polymers in Japan
    4.5 The Medical Polymer Market in China
    4.5.1 National Laws and Regulations Impacting the Medical Polymer Market in China
    4.5.2 Impact of Chinese Industrial Policy on the Medical Polymer Market
    4.5.3 Analysis of the Market for Medical Polymers in China
    4.5.4 Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Polymers in China
    4.6 The Medical Polymer Market in India
    4.6.1 National Laws and Regulations Impacting the Medical Polymer Market in India
    4.6.2 Analysis of the Market for Medical Polymers in India
    4.6.3 Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Polymers in India
    4.7 Other Notable National Markets for Medical Polymers
    4.7.1 The Medical Polymer Market in Canada
    4.7.2 The Medical Polymer Market in Australia
    4.7.3 The Medical Polymer Market in South Korea
    4.8 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Medical Polymers by Country
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit E-1: Summary Forecast of Medical Polymers by Application ( US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Important Advantages of Polymers and Their Current Applications
    Exhibit 2-2: Thermoplastics - Properties and Uses
    Exhibit 2-3: Common Suppliers of Thermoplastics
    Exhibit 2-4: Opportunities for Different PE Grades
    Exhibit 2-5: Different Suppliers of Polyethylene Products and their Features
    Exhibit 2-6: Requirements and Medical Applications for Various Types of PS
    Exhibit 2-7: Suppliers Of GPPS, HIPS, and SPS Products for Medical Applications and their Trade Names
    Exhibit 2-8: Suppliers and Characteristics of Flexible, Rigid and Semi-rigid Medical Grades of PVC
    Exhibit 2-9: Nylon Products and Manufacturers
    Exhibit 2-10: Medical Devices and Implants Made from Polyurethanes
    Exhibit 2-11: Leading Teflon products, Their Manufacturers, and Application Areas
    Exhibit 3-1: Pricing of Polymers and Polymer-Based Medical Products
    Exhibit 3-2: Approximate Market Share of Different Polymer Types in Each Application
    Exhibit 3-3: Selected Polymeric Orthopedic Products, their Manufacturers and Opportunities
    Exhibit 3-4: Approved Breast Implants and their Market Opportunities
    Exhibit 3-5: Overview of Important Blood Filters
    Exhibit 3-6: Overview of Selected Wound Dressing Materials
    Exhibit 3-7: Orthopedic Implants and Regenerative Medicines Forecast
    Exhibit 3-8: Forecast of Polymer Use In Lens Implants
    Exhibit 3-9: Forecast of Polymer Use in Contact Lenses
    Exhibit 3-10: Forecast of Polymer Use in Implantable Defibrillators
    Exhibit 3-11: Forecast of Polymer Use In Breast Implants
    Exhibit 3-12: Forecast of Conductive Polymer Use In Neural Implants
    Exhibit 3-13: Forecast of Polymer Use In Blood Filters
    Exhibit 3-14: Forecast of Polymer Use In Other Medical Devices
    Exhibit 3-15: Polymers Used in Diagnostic Devices and Their Future Opportunities
    Exhibit 3-16: Forecast of Polymer Use In Diagnostic Devices
    Exhibit 3-17: Forecast of Polymer Use In Automated Analyzers
    Exhibit 3-18: Forecast of Polymer Use In Homecare Diagnostic Devices
    Exhibit 3-19: Forecast of Polymer Use In Point-of-Care (POC) Diagnostics
    Exhibit 3-20: Overview of Important Polymers for Multiple-Use and Disposable Labware Fabrication
    Exhibit 3-21: Leading Labware Manufacturers and Their Brands and Market Potential
    Exhibit 3-22: Selected Catheter and Tubing Products
    Exhibit 3-23: Surgical Gloves and Their Specifications
    Exhibit 3-24: Forecast of Polymer Use In Surgical Screws, Nails and Plates
    Exhibit 3-25: Forecast of Polymer Use In Catheters and Tubing
    Exhibit 3-26: Forecast of Polymer Use In Surgical Gloves
    Exhibit 3-27: Forecast of Polymer Use In  Sutures and Shunts
    Exhibit 3-28: Summary Forecast of Medical Polymers by Application (US $Millions)
    Exhibit 3-29: Summary Forecast by Top  Polymer Types (U.S.$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-1: Key Industry Issues, Their Impacts, and Probable Solutions
    Exhibit 4-2: Important U.S. Regulations Affecting Medical Polymers
    Exhibit 4-3: Key Players in the U.S. Medical Polymer Industry Responding to Major Trends
    Exhibit 4-4: Eight-Year Forecast of Medical Polymers in the U.S. (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-5: Key EC Regulations and Their Significance
    Exhibit 4-6: Recent Technology Developments in Europe
    Exhibit 4-7: Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Polymers in Europe (US$ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-8: Important Regulations in Japan and Their Impact on the Medical Polymers Market
    Exhibit 4-9: Recent Technology Developments in Japan
    Exhibit 4-10: Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Polymers in Japan (US $Millions)
    Exhibit 4-11: Key Impacts of CFDA Policies and Opportunities for Policy Improvement in China
    Exhibit 4-12: Recent Technology Developments in China
    Exhibit 4-13: Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Polymers in China (US $Millions)
    Exhibit 4-14: Key Regulatory Impacts and Opportunities for Policy Improvement in India
    Exhibit 4-15: Recent Technology Developments in India
    Exhibit 4-16: Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Polymers in India (US $Millions)
    Exhibit 4-17: Regulatory Scenario and Industry Opportunities in Other Markets
    Exhibit 4-18: Global Eight-Year Forecast for Medical Polymers Broken Out by Country/Region

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Single User $3,495.00  
Advanced (up to 5 users) $4,495.00  
Enterprise $5,495.00  
REPORT # ST-002 PUBLISHED September 12, 2013
3D Printing Markets: Hope, Hype and Strategies
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Emerging Electronics
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    This report is published by SmarTech Publishing.  The report “3D Printing Markets: Hope, Hype and Strategies” is available for purchase via NanoMarkets.

    This report pinpoints where the real opportunities will be found in the emerging 3D printing sector.  Readers of the report will find an application-by-application assessment of the opportunities for 3D printing including comprehensive and granular ten-year forecasts of hardware, software and services.

    The report also contains detailed profiles of leading firms to watch in the 3D printing space with SmarTech’s assessment of their strategies and business models.  The report also analyzes where there are gaps in the market that could be filled by start-ups and how established “rust belt” manufacturers are likely to react to the rise of 3D Printing. 

    The objective of this report is to provide essential input to senior executives making marketing, business development and investment decisions in the rapidly evolving 3D printing business:

    • 3D printer and scanner firms will better understand which applications represent true opportunities and which are just hype.  Furthermore, where this report identifies new sources of business revenue it also provides guidance on market evolution and timing

    • CAD firms, software companies and service bureau will gain insight into where they can seek new addressable markets in the 3D printing space and how they should develop their business models over next decade

    • Potential end users of 3D printing throughout industry will increase their knowledge of where 3D printing is expected to advance revolutionary change and where it is expected to be merely a useful tool. In addition, they will come to understand the capabilities of state-of-the-art 3D printing and how those capabilities will increase over the coming decade.

    This report provides a roadmap for 3D printing technology that will be invaluable to product managers of all kinds and its scope extends to all serious applications and end user sectors that have been proposed for 3D printing to date.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter 1: Business Strategies for the 3D Printing Industry
    1.1 Is 3D Printing Really a Disruptive Technology?       
    1.2 Successful Strategies for 3D Printer Companies      
    1.3 Emerging Software Strategies for the 3D Printing Industry
    1.4 3D Printing Service Bureau Strategies
    1.5 Key R&D Trends in 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing
    1.5.1 Consortium Organizations
    1.5.2 Academic and Government R&D
    1.5.3 Technology Roadmap    
    1.6 Current and Future Financing Patterns for 3D Printing Businesses
    1.6.1 Traditional Sources of Finance:  Venture Capitalists and Investment Banks
    1.6.2 Role of Strategic Investments 
    1.6.2 Will Crowdsourcing Play a Role in the Future of 3D Printing     
    1.7 Supply Chain/Marketing Channel Evolution for the 3D Printing Industry
    1.7.1 3D Printing Clusters and Clouds
    1.7.2 3D Printing’s Potential Disruption of Existing Supply Chains
    1.8 3D Printing:  A Threat to the Traditional Machine Tool Industry
    1.9 Materials Strategies and Evolution for 3D Printing
    1.9.1 Novel Plastics and Metals
    1.9.2 Composites
    1.9.3 Ceramics
    1.10 Intellectual Property as a Factor in 3D Printing
    1.10 Ten Firms That Will Shape the Future 3D Printing Business      
    1.11 Major Barriers to Adoption for 3D Printing
    1.12 Key Points Made in this Section

    Chapter 2:  Revenue Generation:  Emerging and Established Markets for 3D Printing
    2.1 Generic Advantages and Disadvantages of 3D Printing Manufacturing  
    2.2 Future Evolution of 3D Printing: Home Brew to Small-Scale Manufacturing
    2.2.1 The “Maker” Movement and the Firms that Supply It
    2.2.2 Homebrew/Small-Scale Manufacturing:  Current and Future Printer Needs
    2.2.3 Growing Use of Additive Manufacturing in Less Developed Nations    
    2.2.4 Ten-Year Forecasts of Revenues from Home Brew/Small-Scale 3D Printing
    2.3 Rapid Prototyping and Rapid Manufacturing   
    2.3.1 Printers for Rapid Prototyping/Rapid Manufacturing:  Suppliers and Products
    2.3.2 Rapid Prototyping and 3D Printing
    2.3.3 Rapid Manufacturing of Spares and Replacements
    2.3.4 3D Printing and Die Making     
    2.3.5 Ten-Year Forecasts of Revenues from Rapid Prototyping/Rapid Manufacturing
    2.4 General Industrial Applications for 3D Printing        
    2.4.1 Aerospace  
    2.4.2 Automotive
    2.4.3 Building and Household Products
    2.4.4 Furniture
    2.4.5 Clothing and Footwear
    2.4.6 Consumer Electronics
    2.4.7 Toys and Dolls
    2.4.8 Jewelry, Art and Musical Instruments
    2.4.8 Other
    2.4.9 Ten-Year Forecasts of Revenues from General Industrial Applications
    2.5 3D Printing in the Food and Restaurant Industry
    2.6 Medical and Dental Applications for 3D Printing       
    2.6.1 Special Materials for Medical and Dental Applications
    2.6.2 Ten-Year Forecasts of Revenues from Medical, Dental and Pharma
    2.7 Educational Applications for 3D Printing
    2.8 Architecture and Design   
    2.9 3D Printing for Military and Police Applications
    2.9.1 Ten-Year Forecasts of Revenues from Military and Police Applications for 3D Printing
    2.10 Emerging and Future Applications
    2.10.1 How Far Can We Take 3D Printing:  The Myth of the Printed Remote
    2.11 Key Points Made in this Section

    Chapter 3: 3D Printers:  Technology and Product Evolution 
    3.1 Industrial-scale 3D Printers
    3.1.1 Core Technologies and Future Product Evolution  
    3.1.2 Key Suppliers and Products     
    3.2 3D Printers for “Makers” and Hobbyists
    3.2.1 Core Technologies and Future Product Evolution  
    3.2.2 The Future of Open Source in 3D Printing    
    3.2.3 Key Suppliers and Products     
    3.3 3D Printers for the Home  
    3.3.1 Core Technologies and Future Product Evolution  
    3.3.2 Key Suppliers and Products     
    3.4   Specialist 3D Printers for Medical and Educational Applications 
    3.5   3D Scanners and Scanning Technology       
    3.6   3D Printer/Additive Printing Equipment Pricing Trends    
    3.7   Ten-Year Forecasts of Revenues from 3D Printers and Scanners       
    3.8 Key Points Made in this Section

    Chapter 4:  Software and Services Opportunities in 3D Printing
    4.1 Evolution of 3D Printing File Formats
    4.2 3D Printing and Scanning Service Bureaus    
    4.2.1 Entry of large firms into the 3D Service Bureau Business
    4.2 3D Design and Modeling Software       
    4.2.1 Solid Modeling CAD
    4.2.2 3D Computer Graphics
    4.2.3 Scanning Software
    4.3 Ten-Year Forecasts of Revenues from 3D Printers and Scanners
    4.4 Key Points Made in this Section

    Acronyms
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits:

    Exhibit 1-1: Numbers of 3D Printers Shipped and Installed
    Exhibit 1-2: Summary of Ten-Year Market Forecasts of 3D Printing Markets by Type of Product ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 1-3: Summary of Ten-Year Market Forecasts of 3D Printing Markets by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 1-4: 3D Printing–Benefits, Challenges and Opportunities
    Exhibit 1-5: 3D Printing:  Long-Term Market Expansion Possibilities
    Exhibit 1-6: Inherent Limitations of 3D Printing and Likely Progress in the Future
    Exhibit 1-7: Current and Future Role for 3D Printing in Customization
    Exhibit 1-8: Key 3D Printing Service Bureaus
    Exhibit 1-9: Recent Venture Capital Investments in the 3D Printing Sector
    Exhibit 1-10: 3D Printing Channel Evolution
    Exhibit: 2-1: Selected Firms that Supply the "Makers"
    Exhibit 2-2: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in the Home/Makers Sector
    Exhibit-2-3: Rapid Prototyping Using 3D Printing:  Examples from Industry
    Exhibit 2-4: Notable 3D Printing Firms: Manufacturing Sector Strategies
    Exhibit 2-5: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in Other Rapid Manufacturing and Prototyping
    Exhibit 2-6: Main Opportunities for 3D Printing in Automotive Applications
    Exhibit 2-7: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in the Automobile Industry
    Exhibit 2-8: Main Opportunities for 3D Printing in Aerospace Applications
    Exhibit 2-9: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in the Aerospace Industry
    Exhibit 2-10: Main Opportunities for 3D Printing in Medical Applications
    Exhibit 2-11: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in the Medical Sector
    Exhibit 2-12: Main Opportunities for 3D Printing in Education
    Exhibit 2-13: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in the Education Sector
    Exhibit 2-14: Main Opportunities for 3D Printing in Architecture, Construction and Design
    Exhibit 2-15: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in the Construction and Architectural Sector
    Exhibit 2-16: Main Opportunities for 3D Printing in the Military
    Exhibit 2-17: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in the Military
    Exhibit 2-18: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in "Other" Sectors
    Exhibit 3-1: Selected Specialized 3D Printers for Niche Applications
    Exhibit 3-2: Selected 3D Scanner Technologies
    Exhibit 3-3: Selected 3D Scanners and their Capabilities
    Exhibit 3-4: Ten-Year Market Forecasts of 3D Printers by Application  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-5: Ten-Year Market Forecasts of Scanners for the 3D Printing Market by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-1: Notable 3D Printing Bureaus Worldwide
    Exhibit 4-2: Selected Companies Providing 3D Scanning Services
    Exhibit 4-3: Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Printer Equipment and Services in Service Bureaus
    Exhibit 4-4: Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printing Service Revenue by End User ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-5: Selected Design/Modeling Software Packages Used in the 3D Printing Sector
    Exhibit 4-6: Selected Scanning Software Used With3D Printers
    Exhibit 4-7: Ten-Year Forecasts of 3D Printing Software by End User  ($ Millions)


    This report is published by SmarTech Publishing.  The report “3D Printing Markets: Hope, Hype and Strategies” is available for purchase via NanoMarkets.

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-653 PUBLISHED August 28, 2013
Transparent Conductor Markets 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    The past year has seen major changes in the world of transparent conductors (TCs). Efforts by Intel and especially Microsoft to bring touch to every laptop have suggested new opportunities for non-ITO TCs.  Meanwhile, the continued rapid growth in tablet computing can only be regarded as a positive sign for TCs.

    On the other hand, new ways of producing both touch panels and displays suggest that display OEMs may be using less TC material in the future.  At the same time flexible displays, OLED TVs and other applications that were supposed to generate major revenues for non-ITO TCs seem just as slow to develop as they did in 2012.

    In this somewhat confusing phase of the development of TCs, NanoMarkets believes that this new report provides the necessary strategic insight into how TC firms can best generate new business revenues in the in the display, solar panel and other sectors. This report also analyzes important developments on the TC materials front and it takes a peek at what the next generation of transparent conductors will look like and how these materials will extend addressable markets. 

    This study also contains detailed eight-year forecasts in volume (square meters) and value terms.  For each of the applications covered there are breakouts of demand for ITO, other TCOs, ITO/TCO inks, carbon nanotube films, silver-based and cooper-based transparent conductors, other nanometallic transparent conductors and conductive polymers.  And there is also a forecast of ITO products by type (sputtering targets, films, coated glass, etc.).  Finally, the strategies of the leading TC firms are also assessed in the context of the latest market developments.

    NanoMarkets has been covering the TC market for seven years and its studies in this area are widely regarded as the most reliable insider analysis publicly available.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary

    E.1  What Has Changed Since Last Year?
    E.1.1 Touch is the All-Important Opportunity:  Windows 8 versus In-Cell and On-Cell
    E.2 What the OLED Explosion Means for Transparent Conductor Makers
    E.3  Flexible Panels:  Waiting for Godot?
    E.4 Will the LCD Industry Ever Open Up to Alternative Transparent Conductors?
    E.5 Better Times Ahead for Selling Transparent Conductors into the PV Space?
    E.6 Transparent Conductors:  Materials and Companies to Watch
    E.6.1 Metal Meshes:  The Old Made New
    E.6.2 Silver Nanowire Coatings:  Becoming a Standard for an ITO Alternative
    E.6.3 Still Hope for Carbon Nanotubes?
    E.6.4 The Future of TCs:  New Materials and Printing Perhaps
    E.7 Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts For Transparent Conductor Markets

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Touch Everywhere:  Good News for Non-ITO Transparent Conductors
    1.1.2 But the Latest Tech Trends from the Display Industry Should Worry the Transparent Conductor Sector
    1.1.3 Non-ITO TCs are at a Tipping Point
    1.1.4 Same Old, Same Old
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.2.1 Materials Covered in this Report
    1.2.2 Sectors Covered in this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    1.3.2 Assumptions About Materials Utilization, Wastage and Yields
    1.3.3 Cost Assumptions
    1.3.4 General Economic Assumptions
    1.3.5 Sources of Data
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Recent Technology and Market Trends for ITO
    2.1 Developments in the ITO Sector
    2.2 ITO and Flexibility Redux
    2.3 Evolution of the ITO Marketplace in the 2012-2013 Period
    2.4 Resistivity Issues and the Market
    2.5 A Thought Experiment on Why ITO Price Rises Matter
    2.6 Supply Chain Developments:  ITO Glass
    2.7 Prospects for ITO Film Markets
    2.8 ITO Sputtering Target Markets
    2.9 Alternatives to Sputtering:  Can ITO Inks Ever Make it To Market?
    2.9.1 ITO Inks
    2.10 Eight-Year Forecast of ITO Markets
    2.10.1 Forecast of ITO Inks
    2.10.2 Summary of ITO Forecasts by Type of ITO Product: Targets, Film and Coated Glass
    2.11 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Three:  Other Transparent Conducting Oxides:  New R&D, New Uses
    3.1 The Arguments for Non-ITO TCOs
    3.1.1 Tin Oxide and its Variants
    3.1.2 Zinc Oxide and its Variants
    3.2 More TCOs for the Future?
    3.2.1 Other Possibilities
    3.3 Are Other TCOs Really a Drop-In Replacement?
    3.4 Why Would PV Ever Leave TCOs?
    3.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Non-ITO Markets
    3.6 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Four: Markets for Metal-Based Materials as Transparent Conductors
    4.1 Evolution of Transparent Conductors Using Metals
    4.1.1 Metallic Films:  A Possibility
    4.2 Metal Meshes
    4.2.1 Advantages and Potential Applications of Metal Meshes
    4.2.2 Disadvantages of Metal Meshes as Transparent Conductors
    4.2.3 Metal Meshes in PV
    4.3 Nanowire Solutions:  Cambrios and the Others
    4.3.1 Advantages and Applications for Silver Nanowires
    4.3.2 Silver Nanowires:  The One to Watch?
    4.4 Are there Opportunities for Copper in the Transparent Conductor Market?
    4.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Metal Transparent Conductor Markets
    4.5.1 Metal Meshes
    4.5.2 Silver Nanowires
    4.6 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Five: Markets for Other Transparent Conducting Materials
    5.1 Other Materials
    5.2 Conductive Polymers as Transparent Conductors: Recent Successes
    5.2.1 PEDOT
    5.2.2 Conductive Polymers in OLEDs
    5.2.3 Other Applications
    5.2.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Transparent Conductive Polymer Markets
    5.2.5 Cost Trends for PEDOT
    5.2.6 PEDOT Suppliers for Transparent Conductor Applications
    5.2.7 Possible Technology Developments in Conductive Polymers
    5.3 Carbon Nanotubes as Transparent Conductors: Loser?
    5.3.1 The Advantages and Disadvantages of Carbon Nanotubes for  Transparent Conductors
    5.3.2 Limiting the Carbon Nanotube: Making Them "Just Conductors"
    5.3.3 Derivatization of Carbon Nanotubes
    5.3.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Carbon Nanotube Transparent Conductor Markets
    5.3.5 Changes in the Supply Structure for Carbon Nanotube Transparent Conductors
    5.3.6 Coda on the Future of Carbon Nanotube-Based Transparent Conductors
    5.4 Graphene:  Does it Stand a Chance in the Transparent Conductor Market?
    5.5 Other Developments:  “Fourth-Generation” Transparent Conductors
    5.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Other Transparent Conductor Materials Markets
    5.7 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Six:  Emerging Markets for Transparent Conductors
    6.1 Touch Screen Sensors:  Everyone’s Favorite Opportunity
    6.1.1 The Shift to New Touch Module Architectures May Hurt the Prospects for Transparent Conductor Makers
    6.1.2 Projected-Capacitive Touch Sensors as a Market for Transparent Conductors
    6.1.3 The Analog-Resistive Touch Sensors as a Market for Transparent Conductors
    6.1.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the Touch-Screen Sensor Industry
    6.2 Transparent Conductors and the OLED Industry’s Great Leaps Forward
    6.2.1 OLED Market Explodes
    6.2.2 How OLEDs Potentially Shrink the TC Market
    6.2.3 The Quest to Get Rid of ITO in OLEDs
    6.2.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the OLED Display and Lighting Market
    6.3 Transparent Conductors for E-paper
    6.3.1 Varieties of E-Paper Displays and their TC Requirements
    6.3.2 Shifts from ITO in the E-Paper Space
    6.3.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the E-Paper Display and Lighting Market
    6.4 Conventional Flat-Panel Displays: Stuck On ITO Forever?
    6.4.1 Strategies for non-ITO Transparent Conductor Firms in the LCD Market
    6.4.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the Flat-Panel Display Industry
    6.4.3 Notes on Transparent Conductors in Plasma Displays
    6.4.4 A Note on the Impact of Transparent Displays on the Transparent Conductor Market
    6.4.5 Flexible Electronics Mythologies and Realities: Their Impact on the Transparent Conductor Market
    6.5 Transparent Conductors and the Future of Solar Panels
    6.5.1 Transparent Conductor Usage for the Thin-Film Silicon PV Sector
    6.5.2 Transparent Conductor Usage for CdTe PV
    6.5.3 Transparent Conductors in CIGS PV Market
    6.5.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the Thin-Film  PV Market
    6.5.5 Organic PV and Dye Sensitized Cells: A Worthwhile Market for Transparent Conductor Suppliers
    6.5.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the OPV/DSC Market
    6.6 IR and UV Protection Opportunities for Transparent Conductors
    6.7 Antistatic Applications for Transparent Conductors
    6.7.1 Antistatic Markets in the Building Products Industry
    6.7.2 ESD Applications for the Electronics Market
    6.7.3 Tin Oxide as an Antistatic Coating
    6.7.4 Zinc Oxide as an Antistatic Coating
    6.7.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Transparent Conductors for Antistatic Coatings
    6.8 Transparent Conductors in EMI/RFI Shielding
    6.8.1 Eight-Year Forecast of Transparent Conductors for EMI Shielding
    6.9 Smart Windows Applications for Transparent Conductors
    6.9.1 Low-E Windows
    6.9.2 Solar Control Films
    6.9.3 Electrochromic (EC) and Suspended Particle Device (SPD) Technologies
    6.9.4 PDLC Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    6.9.5 Thermochromic Smart Glass
    6.9.6 Self-Cleaning Windows
    6.10 Yet Other Markets for Transparent Conductors
    6.11 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit E-1: Addressable Markets for non-ITO Transparent Conductors
    Exhibit E-2: NanoMarkets' Perspective and Expectations of Penetration of Selected Transparent Conductor Materials
    Exhibit E-3: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductive Materials
    by Material Type ($ Millions)
    Exhibit E-4: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductive Materials
    by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: ITO in the Display BOM:  A Thought Experiment ($, except final line)
    Exhibit 2-2: ITO Products in Current Use
    Exhibit 2-3: Summary of Forecast of ITO by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 2-4: Summary of Forecast of ITO and TCO Inks by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 2-5: ITO Market by End-User Product Process (1) ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-1: Summary of Forecast of non-ITO TCOs by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 4-1:  Summary of Forecast of Metal Meshes by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 4-2: Summary of Forecast of  Silver Nanowires by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 5-1: Summary of Forecast of Transparent Conductive Polymers by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 5-2: PEDOS Properties
    Exhibit 5-3: Summary of Forecast of Carbon Nanotube Films by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 5-4: Summary of Forecast of Other Transparent Conductive Materials by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 6-1: Why the Touch Sensor Business is Attractive for Transparent Conductor Makers
    Exhibit 6-2: Important Parameters for Transparent Conductors Used for Touch-Screen Sensors
    Exhibit 6-3: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand in Touch-Screen Display Sensors
    Exhibit 6-4: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in Touch-Screen Display Sensors
    Exhibit 6-5: Long-Term Issues that ITO Faces in the OLED Market
    Exhibit 6-6: Important Parameters for Transparent Conductors Used for OLED Display Electrodes
    Exhibit 6-7: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand in OLED Displays (Excludes OLED Lighting)
    Exhibit 6-8: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand by Type in OLED Displays (Excludes OLED Lighting)
    Exhibit 6-9: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand in OLED Lighting
    Exhibit 6- 10: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in OLED Lighting
    Exhibit 6-11: Important R for Transparent Conductors Used for EPDs
    Exhibit 6-12: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand in E-Paper Displays
    Exhibit 6-13: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in E-Paper Displays
    Exhibit 6-14: Important Requirements for Transparent Conductors Used for LCD Displays
    Exhibit 6-15: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand in Flat-Panel Displays (LCD and PDP)
    Exhibit 6-16: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in LCDs and PDPs
    Exhibit 6-17: Important Parameters for Transparent Conductors Used for Plasma Displays
    Exhibit 6-18: Flexibility of Transparent Conductive Material Types
    Exhibit 6-19: Selected Flexible Display Frontplane Technologies
    Exhibit 6-20: Potential Opportunities for non-ITO Transparent Conductors in the Flexible Display Market
    Exhibit 6-21: Important Parameters for Transparent Conductors Used for PV Electrodes
    Exhibit 6-22: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand in Thin-Film Photovoltaics
    Exhibit 6-23: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in Thin-Film Photovoltaics
    Exhibit 6-24: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand in OPV/DSC
    Exhibit 6-25: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in OPV/DSC
    Exhibit 6-26: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in Antistatic Coatings
    Exhibit 6-27: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in Electromagnetic Shielding
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-645 PUBLISHED July 18, 2013
Markets for Smart Lighting Driver, Controller and Sensor Chips
CATEGORIES :
  • Emerging Electronics
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    The objective of this report is to identify and quantify the opportunities for electronics in smart lighting systems over the next eight years.  It is designed to become required reading for firms in the semiconductor industry that want to better understand the opportunities in smart lighting electronics.  It is also intended to provides guidance to firms in the LED and smart lighting systems sectors who need to better understand where smart-lighting electronics trends will take their businesses. 

    With this in mind, the focus of the analysis in this report is on the newer kinds of smart lighting – meaning those that are specifically designed for energy efficiency, color tuning or VLC.  We do not concern ourselves with the standard lighting management systems that have been around for years.  These systems do consume chips, but almost exclusively commoditized electronics that does not represent an opportunity in any meaningful sense. 

    Instead, most of the focus of this report is on where we think such profits might be made.  In the immediate future, this would seem to be in the form of chips that provide better control over the energy efficiency of lighting systems.  This is to say that one focus of the report is on the high end of the LED driver business and we are specifically concerned with how this might change in the near term to better match lighting requirements for energy efficiency and to gradually pick up on emerging needs for color tuning.

    The report also looks at chips that are primarily involved with communications.  These include VLC chips, of course, but also ZigBee and Wi-Fi chips.  MPUs for smart lighting gateways and controllers also fit into this definition and are also covered here;  smart lighting control systems will become increasingly networked.

    Finally, we note that the “smart lighting” definition doesn’t specify the type of bulb and might be taken to include fluorescent lighting (or even incandescent lighting).  However, we are in this report focusing entirely on the LED segment.  The motivation for this – as we have noted before – is that the electronics for non-LED lighting systems is completely commoditized and the interesting sector of the smart lighting market (that is the one where there are the greatest opportunities) is associated with LED systems.  In this context we note that while CFLs are now in the ascendant they are likely to be replaced by high-performance LEDs within a relativelt short space of time.

    Also excluded from this report is any discussion of the evolution of LEDs themselves, except where this has some relevance to the main argument.  The reason for this is that although LEDs are certainly chips, they are associated with an entirely different group of suppliers than the electronic chips that go into smart lighting systems.  In addition, although LED development will certainly involve more development work to make them more energy efficient, LEDs cannot themselves be said to be “smart” in any interesting sense.

    In addition to a broad coverage of technologies and functionality related to smart lighting, this report also covers the needs of all the major end-user segments of the market.  We take these to be commercial and industrial, residential, government and public buildings. We have also discussed the available markets for smart lighting in transportation and outdoor lighting.

    This report includes a granular eight-year forecast of smart-lighting electronics with breakouts by application and type of chip.  It also includes a full critical appraisal of all the available product and market strategies in this interesting emerging segment of the smart lighting industry. Finally, this report—and the forecasts in Chapter Three —is intended to be international in scope, although we do comment at various points in the report on which countries and regions are most likely to be open to the penetration of smart lighting technology.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Summary of Key Opportunities from Smart Lighting Electronics
    E.1.1 LED Drivers for Smart Lighting:  Waiting for Next-Generation Smart Lighting
    E.1.2 MCUs for Smart Lighting:  Critical for Smart Lighting Until the Internet-of-Things Catches On?
    E.1.3 Sensor Opportunities in the Smart Lighting Space
    E.1.4 Color Tuning Chips:  Opportunities for the Semiconductor Industry in Second Generation Smart Lighting Systems
    E.1.5 Chips and Li-Fi
    E.2 Ten Firms to Watch in the Smart Lighting System Electronics Space
    E.2.1 ARM
    E.2.2 Broadcom
    E.2.3 Freescale
    E.2.4 Infineon
    E.2.5 Intel
    E.2.6 Marvell
    E.2.7 Microchip Technology
    E.2.8 NXP Semiconductor
    E.2.9 STMicroelectronics
    E.2.10 Texas Instruments
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Lighting Chips

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Current MCU and LED Driver Requirements for Smart Lighting
    1.1.2 Chip Opportunities for a Light-Tuned World
    1.1.3 Sensing Opportunities:  New Materials, ZigBee and EnOcean
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two:  Smart Lighting Evolution and Chip Requirements
    2.1 The Smart Lighting Opportunity for Chip Makers:  Some Definitions
    2.2 Opportunities for LED Drivers in the Smart Lighting Systems
    2.2.1 Driver Supplier and the Potential for New Entrants:  From BLUs to Smart Lighting
    2.2.2 Improve Binning:  A Unintended Opportunity for Smart Lighting Driver Makers
    2.2.3 AC LEDs in Smart Lighting and Future of Driver Chips: A Possible Negative for the Smart Lighting Driver Market
    2.2.4 Voltage and Current Control and Power Load Design as Central Competitive Issues for LED Drivers in the Smart Lighting Space
    2.2.5 Dimming and LED Drivers
    2.2.5 IC Requirements for Smart LED Drivers
    2.3 Pricing of LED Drivers in the Smart Lighting Systems Market
    2.3.1 Smart Lighting as a Pioneer Market for High-Performance LED Drivers
    2.3.2 Impact of Declining Chip Prices and Costs:  The Smart Lighting Systems Perspective
    2.4 Other Factors Impacting the Smart Lighting LED Driver Sector:  Standards
    2.5  MCUs for Gatways and Controller Boxes in Smart Lighting
    2.5.1 The Rise of Central Controllers in the Smart Lighting Systems Market: Their Use of MCUs
    2.5.2 Generation 1 Smart Lighting Systems: Central Controllers as Early Competitive Battlefield for Smart Lighting
    2.5.3 A Note on the Possible Disappearance of Gateways:  A Threat to MCU Makers
    2.5.4 MCUs for Smart Lighting
    2.5.5 Some Notes on Smart Ballasts
    2.6 Smart Lighting Sensors
    2.6.1 Occupancy Sensing
    2.6.2  Daylight Sensing
    2.6.3 Creating Value-Added Sensing Devices for Smart Lighting Applications:  Further Integration and New Materials
    2.6.4 Smart Lighting Sensor Innovations from the Systems Perspective
    2.6.5 ZigBee and Smart Lighting:  Growing Interest from the LED Lighting Community
    2.6.6 EnOcean and Smart Lighting:  Energy Harvesting for Smart Lighting?
    2.7 Impact of the “Internet-of-Things” on Smart Lighting Electronics
    2.8 Other Protocols that May Create Opportunities for Smart Lighting Makers
    2.8.1 Demand Response and DALI
    2.8.2 Standards for Integration of Smart Lighting with Building Automation:  BACnet, LonWorks, DMX512, ASHRAE 90.1  and the Others
    2.8.3 Thoughts on IPv6 and Smart Lighting
    2.8.3 MiWi
    2.9 Chip Requirements for Smart Mood, Health and Performance Lighting
    2.9.1 Color Tuning and the Need for Dynamic Mood and Health Lighting
    2.9.2 Opportunities for the Semiconductor Industry in Color-Tuning (Generation 2) Lighting Systems
    2.10 Chip Requirements for Visible Light Communications
    2.10.1 Evolution of Li-Fi Technology and its Markets
    2.10.2 The Downside of VLC/Li-Fi
    2.10.3 VLC/Li-Fi Players and Silicon Requirements
    2.11 Impact of OLED Lighting Trends on Smart Lighting Electronics
    2.11.1 OLED Drivers in the IMOLA Project
    2.12 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Smart Lighting Electronics:  Market Analysis and Eight-Year Forecast
    3.1 Methodology of this Forecast
    3.1.1 Addressable Markets
    3.1.2 Assumptions about Market Size and Penetration
    3.1.3 Forecasting Methodology and Scope
    3.1.4 Other Market and Technology Scenarios and their Impact on the Smart Lighting Electronics
    3.2 Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Lighting Electronics by End User Type
    3.2.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electronics For Residential Smart Lighting Systems
    3.2.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electronics for Commercial and Industrial Buildings Smart Lighting Systems
    3.2.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electronics for Smart Lighting Systems for Government and Public Buildings
    3.2.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electronics for Smart Lighting Systems for Outdoor/Streetlighting
    3.2.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Electronics for Smart Lighting Systems in Automobiles and Other Forms of Transportation
    3.2.7 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electronics in Smart Lighting Systems for Other Applications:  Urban Farming and Hospitals
    3.2.8 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Electronics in Smart Lighting Systems
    3.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics by Type of Chip Product
    3.3.1 Forecasts of Smart Lighting LED Driver Opportunities
    3.3.2 Forecasts of Smart Lighting MCU and Control Chip Opportunities
    3.3.3 Forecasts of Smart Lighting Sensor Opportunities
    3.3.4 Summary of Forecasts by Type of Chip Products
    3.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics by Type of Systems Component in Which They Are Used
    3.4.1 Forecast of Smart Lighting Electronics Used in “Smart Lamps”
    3.4.2 Forecast of Smart Lighting Electronics Used in Smart Switches and Dimmers
    3.4.3 Forecast of Smart Lighting Electronics Used in Central Controllers/Gateways
    3.4.4 Summary of Smart Lighting Electronics Forecast by System Component
    3.7 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    About the Author

    List of Figures:

    Exhibit E-1: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics by Functionality ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Smart Lighting Systems Generations
    Exhibit 2-2: Two Scenarios for Smart Lighting Connectivity to the Internet
    Exhibit 2-3: Design/Technology for Automation Controllers
    Exhibit 2-4: Possible Markets for Dynamic Mood and Health Lighting Systems
    Exhibit 3-1: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Residential Building Markets
    Exhibit 3-2: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Residential Building Markets:  By Generations of System
    Exhibit 3-3: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Commercial and Industrial Building Markets
    Exhibit 3-4: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Commercial and Industrial Building Markets:  By Generations of System
    Exhibit 3-5: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Public and Government Building Markets
    Exhibit 3-6: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Public and Government Building Markets:  By Generations of System
    Exhibit 3-7: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Outdoor/Street Lighting Markets
    Exhibit 3-8: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Outdoor/Street Lighting:  By Generations of System
    Exhibit 3-9: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Automobile/Transportation Markets
    Exhibit 3-10: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Transportation Lighting:  By Generations of System ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-11: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics for Other Smart Lighting Markets ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-12: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics by End User ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-13: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics by Generation ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-14: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting LED Drivers by Functionality ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-15: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting MCUs and Control Chips by Functionality ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-16: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Sensors by Functionality ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-17: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics by Functionality ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-18: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics Used in Smart Lamps ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-19: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics Used in Smart Switches and Dimmers ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-20: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics Used in Central Controllers ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-21: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Electronics Used by System Component ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-639 PUBLISHED June 10, 2013
Worldwide Smart Windows Markets: 2013-2020
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    NanoMarkets has now been tracking the smart windows for four years.   During that time many smart windows technologies have become mature, reducing the uncertainties associated with deploying smart windows in both buildings and vehicles.  At the same time, higher energy prices ensure that the value created by smart windows is increasing rapidly.

    With these trends in mind, this latest smart windows report from NanoMarkets examines where the next opportunities in the self-dimming and self-cleaning windows sector are coming from.  As with the previous NanoMarkets reports in this space, it pinpoints where the money will be made – and lost – in the worldwide smart windows business.  But in this report we have focused especially on projecting the take up of smart windows in the construction, automotive and aerospace industries and the likelihood that it will be specified by designers and architects. The report also discusses which countries and geographical regions present the best potential for selling smart windows.

    As part of the overall analysis, this report also examines the numerous cost and technical challenges that will have to be overcome in this market to make new products a success.  In addition, this report also develops a roadmap for the next-generation smart windows technologies, especially with regard to more effective self-dimming and self-cleaning glass.  Based on the road-mapping process we discuss how the growth of the smart windows will create market opportunities not just for traditional building and automotive window suppliers but also for the glass and coatings industries more broadly.

    As with all NanoMarkets reports, this report contains an eight-year forecast of shipments and revenues in this market and an appraisal of the latest strategies of major players in this market.  NanoMarkets believes that this report will provide guidance to all those interested in the business prospects of smart windows over the coming decade.  These will include marketing and business development executives in the glazing, coatings, construction, automotive and aerospace industries.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Opportunity Analysis of Smart Windows Markets by Technology/Product
    E.1.1 Obstacles to Overcome:  The Case of Skeptical Specifiers
    E.2 Passive Smart Windows:  Getting Better but Not Good Enough?
    E.2.1 Passive Retrofit Window Films
    E.2.2 Passive Thermochromic Windows Market
    E.2.3 The Passive Photochromic Windows Market
    E.3 Active Smart Windows:  Window on the Future
    E.3.1 PDLC Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    E.3.2 SPD Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    E.3.3 Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    E.3.4  A Note on Self-Cleaning Windows
    E.4 Opportunities for Construction and Architectural Firms
    E.5 Opportunities for Transportation Equipment Manufacturers
    E.5.1 Automotive Industry:  Using More Glass
    E.5.2 Aerospace Industry:  Not Big Enough to Matter, But a Source of Ideas
    E.6 Opportunities for Materials Firms
    E.6.1 Glass and Windows Firms
    E.6.2 Coatings and Films Companies
    E.7 Firms to Watch
    E.8 Regions and Countries to Watch
    E.8.1 U.S. – Happy Days are Here Again?
    E.8.2 Europe—the Crisis Continues
    E.8.3 China and Non-Japan Asia—Still Expect Growth
    E.8.4 Japan
    E.8.5 Latin America
    E.9 Summary of the Eight-Year Forecasts for the Smart Windows Market

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 The Regulatory Push for Smart Windows Gains Momentum
    1.1.2 Smart Windows Technology in Hiatus but nor Forever
    1.1.3 Costs Favor Smart Windows Deployment
    1.1.4 Likely Growing Interest in Smart Windows from the Transportation Sector
    1.1.5 Geographic Regions for Growth and Target Markets
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Passive Smart Window Products And Technologies
    2.1 Smart Windows:  Passive versus Active
    2.1.1 Customers Base for Passive Smart Windows in the Construction Industry
    2.1.2 Customers Base for Passive Smart Windows in the Transportation Sector
    2.2 Passive Retrofit Window Films
    2.2.1 Technology:  Mature and Effective
    2.2.2 Why the Passive Retrofit Window Film Market Hasn’t Boomed:  Marketing Efforts by Suppliers
    2.2.3 Potential Technology Evolution
    2.1.4 Key Suppliers of Passive Smart Window Films
    2.3 Passive Thermochromic Windows Market
    2.3.1 Potential Technology Evolution:  Challenges to Overcome
    2.3.2 Key Suppliers
    2.4 The Passive Photochromic Windows Market
    2.4.1 Potential Technology Evolution:  Switch Materials
    2.5 Benchmarking of Passive Smart Window Technologies
    2.6 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three:  Active Smart Window Products and Technologies
    3.1 PDLC Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    3.1.1 Potential Technology Evolution
    3.1.2 Key Suppliers
    3.2 SPD Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    3.2.1 Potential Technology Evolution
    3.2.2 Role of Research Frontiers
    3.2.3 Other Suppliers
    3.3 Electrochromic Active on-Demand Smart Windows
    3.3.1 Potential Technology Evolution
    3.3.2 Key Suppliers
    3.4 Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.4.1 Potential Technology Evolution
    3.4.2 Key Suppliers
    3.5 Benchmarking of Active Smart Window Technologies
    3.6 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Four:  Building Markets For Smart Windows:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    4.1 The Four Forces Shaping the Windows Market
    4.2 Smart Windows and Energy Efficiency
    4.2.1 Rising Real Energy Products Drive Smart Windows:  New Life for an Old Product
    4.2.2 Regulatory Factors:  Smart Windows as a Useful Route to Compliance
    4.2.3 LEED and Other ‘Green’ Building Codes:  Smart Windows in Green Building
    4.3 Comfort, Style and Smart:  Why Smart Windows Could Succeed in the Market without Energy and Environmental Concerns
    4.4 Future Factors Influencing the Smart Window Decision by Building Owners and Managers:  Energy Generation and Storage
    4.5 An Analysis of Smart Windows Supply Chain in Buildings
    4.5.1 Retail, Wholesalers and Market Influencers
    4.5.2 Materials Suppliers and Other Factors in the Smart Windows Supply Chain
    4.6 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for Residential Buildings
    4.6.1 Forecasting Methodology
    4.6.2 Data Sources
    4.6.3 Alternative Scenarios
    4.6.4 Scope of the Smart Windows Market Forecasts and Other Assumptions
    4.6.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Residential Smart Windows Markets:  Total Market
    4.6.6 Forecast of Low-e Glass in Passive Smart Windows:  Residential
    4.6.7 Forecast of Retrofit Window Film in Passive Smart Windows:  Residential
    4.6.8 Forecast of Thermochromic Film in Passive Residential Smart Windows:  Niche
    4.6.9 Forecast of Photochromic Film in Passive Residential Smart Windows:  Niche
    4.6.10 Forecasts of Active Residential Smart Windows by Application Area
    4.6.11 Forecast of PDLC Film in Active On-Demand Residential Smart Windows:  More than a Niche But Not Much!
    4.6.12 Forecast of SPD Film in Active On-Demand Smart Windows: Residential
    4.6.13 Forecast of Electrochromic Smart Glass in Active On-Demand Smart Windows: Years Away
    4.6.14 Forecast of Electrochromic Film in Active On-Demand Residential Smart Windows: Niche
    4.6.15 Summary of Technology Forecasts for Smart Windows in Residential Markets
    4.6.16 Forecast of Residential Smart Windows Market by Major Geographical Regions
    4.7 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for Commercial, Institutional, and Industrial Buildings
    4.7.1 Forecast by Type of Windows:  Commercial, Institutional and Industrial
    4.7.2 Forecast of Low-e Glass in Passive Smart Windows:  Commercial, Institutional and Industrial
    4.7.3 Forecast of Retrofit Window Film in Passive Smart Windows for Non-Residential Applications
    4.7.4 Forecast of Thermochromic Film in non-Residential Passive Smart Windows:  Niche
    4.7.5 Forecast of Photochromic Film in non-Residential Passive Smart Windows:  Niche
    4.7.6 Forecasts of Active Non-Residential Smart Windows by Application Area
    4.7.7 Forecast of PDLC Film in Non-Residential Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    4.7.8 Forecast of SPD Film in Non-Residential Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    4.7.9 Forecast of Non-Residential Electrochromic Smart Glass in Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    4.7.10 Forecast of Electrochromic Film in Non-Residential Active On-Demand Smart Windows:  Niche
    4.7.11 Summary of Forecasts:  Commercial, Industrial and Institutional Markets
    4.7.12 Forecast by Major Geographical Regions:  Commercial Property Trends

    Chapter Five:  Transportation Markets For Smart Windows:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    5.1 Major Factors Shaping Demand for Smart Glass
    5.2 Energy Conservation as a Market Driver for Smart Windows in the Automotive Sector
    5.2.1 Electric Vehicles Will Promote the Use of Smart Windows
    5.2.2 Solar Control Windows Trials at NREL
    5.3 Enhanced Comfort and Style:  Why More Glass?
    5.4 Future Factors Influencing the Decision by Automotive Firms to Use Smart Windows
    5.4.1 Heads-Up Displays in Car Windshields
    5.4.2 Self-Cleaning Glass in Automobiles and Trucks
    5.4.3 Self-Repairing Glass in Automobiles and Trucks
    5.4.4 Energy Generating Glass in Automobiles and Trucks
    5.5 Analysis of Smart Windows Supply Chain for the Auto Sector
    5.5.1 Changes Expected in Industry Structure Because of Increased Use of Smart Auto Glass
    5.6 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for Cars and Trucks
    5.6.1 Forecasts of Passive Smart Windows by Application Area
    5.6.2 Forecast of Retrofit Window Film in Passive Smart Windows:  Automotive
    5.6.3 Forecast of Thermochromic Film in Automotive Passive Smart Windows:  Niche
    5.6.4 Forecast of Photochromic Film in Automotive Passive Smart Windows:  Niche
    5.6.5 Forecasts of Active Smart Windows by Application Area in the Automotive Sector
    5.6.6 Forecast of SPD Film in Active On-Demand Smart Automotive Windows
    5.6.7 Forecast of Electrochromic Smart Glass in Active On-Demand Smart Automotive Windows
    5.6.8 Forecast of Electrochromic Film in Active On-Demand Smart Windows:  Niche
    5.6.9 Summary of Forecasts
    5.6.10 Forecast of Automotive Smart Windows Markets by Major Geographical Regions
    5.7 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for Aircraft
    5.7.1 Forecast of SPD Film in Active On-Demand Smart Windows for Aircraft
    5.7.2 Forecast of Electrochromic Smart Glass in Active On-Demand Smart Windows for Aircraft
    5.7.3 Summary of Forecasts
    5.7.4 Forecast by Major Geographical Regions
    5.8 Eight-Year Market Forecast of the Smart Windows for Public Transportation
    5.8.1 Forecasts of Passive Smart Windows by Application Area:  Public Transportation
    5.8.2 Forecast of Retrofit Window Film in Passive Smart Windows:  Public Transportation
    5.8.3 Forecast of Thermochromic Film in Passive Smart Windows:  Public Transportation – Not Even a Niche!
    5.8.4 Forecast of Photochromic Film in Passive Smart Windows:  Public Transportation – Not Even a Niche!
    5.8.5 Forecasts of Active Smart Windows by Application Area:  Public Transportation
    5.8.6 Forecast of SPD Film in Active On-Demand Smart Windows:  Public Transportation
    5.8.7 Forecast of Electrochromic Smart Glass in Active On-Demand Smart Windows:  Public Transportation
    5.8 8 Forecast of Electrochromic Film in Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    5.8.9 Summary of Forecasts
    5.8.10 Forecast by Major Geographical Regions

    Chapter Six:  Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts
    6.1 Background to Forecast
    6.2  Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Windows by End User Markets
    6.3 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Windows by Technology
    6.4 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Windows by Geographical Region
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Authors

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Firms to Watch in the Smart Windows Market
    Exhibit E-2: Smart Window Glass and Film Market by End-User Markets, 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Selected Suppliers of Passive Retrofit Windows
    Exhibit 2-2: Key Suppliers of Passive Thermochromic Windows Market
    Exhibit 2-3: Benchmarking of Passive Smart Window Technologies
    Exhibit 3-1: Key Suppliers of PDLC Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    Exhibit 3-2: Key Suppliers of Electrochromic Active on-Demand Smart Windows
    Exhibit 3-3: Self-Cleaning Windows Firms:  Comparative Listing
    Exhibit 3-4: Benchmarking of Active Smart Window Technologies
    Exhibit 4-1: New Forces Shaping the Advanced Glazing Industry
    Exhibit 4-2: Building Codes Promoting the use of Smart Windows
    Exhibit 4-3: Likely End-Use Applications by Dynamic Glazing Technology
    Exhibit 4-4: Pricing Estimate for Selected Smart Glass Types
    Exhibit 4-5: Total High Quality Float Glass Market – Market Evolution, 2013-2020 (Millions of Square Meters)
    Exhibit 4-6: Volume of  the Passive Smart Window Film/Glass Market (million sq. meters) 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-7: Value of the Passive Smart Window Film/Glass Market ($ Millions), 2013-2020:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-8: Passive Smart Window Market –Low-e Glass, 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-9: Passive Smart Window Market - Retrofit Window Film Market, 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-10: Passive Smart Window Market - Thermochromic Film, 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-11: Passive Smart Window Market - Photochromic Film 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-12: Volume of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market (million sq. meters), 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-13: Value of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market ($millions), 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-14: PDLC Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-15: SPD Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-16: Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Glass Market, 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-17: Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2012-2019:  Residential
    Exhibit 4-18: Smart Window Glass and Film Market, 2012-2019 ($ Millions):  Residential
    Exhibit 4-19: Smart Windows Market in Residential Buildings: Various Geographies in 2013
    Exhibit 4-20: Smart Windows Market in Residential Buildings: Various Geographies 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-21: Volume of the Passive Smart Window Film/Glass Market (million sq. meters) 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-22: Value of the Passive Smart Window Film/Glass Market ($ Millions), 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-23: Passive Smart Window Market –Low-e Glass, 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-24: Passive Smart Window Market - Retrofit Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-25: Passive Smart Window Market - Thermochromic Film, 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-26: Passive Smart Window Market - Photochromic Film 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-27: Volume of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market (million sq. meters), 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-28: Value of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market ($  millions), 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-29: PDLC Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-30:  SPD Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-31: Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Glass Market, 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-32: Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-33: Smart Window Glass and Film Market, 2013-2020 ($ Millions):  Non-Residential
    Exhibit 4-34: Smart Windows Market in Commercial, Industrial and Institutional Buildings: Various Geographies in 2013
    Exhibit 4-35: Smart Windows Market in Commercial, Industrial and Institutional  Buildings: Various Geographies in 2013
    Exhibit 5-1: The Drivers Shaping Demand for Smart Glass in the Automotive Sector
    Exhibit 5-2: Smart Windows in Automobiles:  Functionality, Timeframes and Benefits
    Exhibit 5-3: Float Glass Demand from Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-4: Volume of the Passive Smart Window Film/Glass Market (million sq. meters) 2013-2020:  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-5: Value of the Passive Smart Window Film/Glass Market ($ Millions), 2013-2020
    Exhibit 5-6: Passive Smart Window Market - Retrofit Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-7: Passive Smart Window Market - Thermochromic Film, 2013-2020:  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-8: Passive Smart Window Market - Photochromic Film 2013-2020:  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-9: Volume of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market (million sq. meters), 2013-2020:  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-10: Value of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market ($  millions), 2013-2020:  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-11: SPD Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-12: Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Glass Market, 2013-2020:  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-13: Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-14: Smart Window Glass and Film Market, 2013-2020 ($ Millions):  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-15: Worldwide Market Share for Passenger Cars  and Light Trucks 2012
    Exhibit 5-16: Worldwide Market Share for Luxury Passenger Cars 2012
    Exhibit 5-17: Smart Windows Market by Geography: 2013-2020 ($ Millions):  Cars and Trucks
    Exhibit 5-18: Float Glass Demand from Aircraft
    Exhibit 5-19: Volume of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market (million sq. meters), 2013-2020:  Aircraft
    Exhibit 5-20: Value of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market ($ millions), 2013-2020:  Aircraft
    Exhibit 5-21: SPD Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Aircraft
    Exhibit 5-22: Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Glass Market, 2013-2020:  Aircraft
    Exhibit 5-23: Smart Window Glass and Film Market, 2013-2020 ($ Millions):  Aircraft
    Exhibit 5-24: The Smart Windows Market by Geographies 2013-2020 ($ Millions):  Aircraft
    Exhibit 5-25: Smart Windows Market : Various Geographies 2013-2020:  Aircraft
    Exhibit 5-26: Volume of the Passive Smart Window Film/Glass Market (million sq. meters) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 5-27: Value of the Passive Smart Window Film/Glass Market ($ Millions), 2013-2020:  Aircraft
    Exhibit 5-28: Float Glass Demand from Public Transportation (Buses and Trains)
    Exhibit 5-29: Passive Smart Window Market - Retrofit Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 5-30: Passive Smart Window Market - Thermochromic Film, 2013-2020:  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 5-31: Passive Smart Window Market - Photochromic Film 2013-2020:  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 5-32: Volume of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market (million sq. meters), 2013-2020:  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 5-33: Value of the Active Smart Window Film/Glass Market ($ millions), 2013-2020:  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 5-34: SPD Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 5-35: Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Glass Market, 2013-2020:  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 5-36: Electrochromic Active On-Demand Smart Window Film Market, 2013-2020:  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 5-37: Smart Window Glass and Film Market, 2013-2020 ($ Millions):  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 5-38: Smart Windows Market Size By Geographies 2013-2020:  Public Transportation
    Exhibit 6-1: Smart Window Glass and Film Market by End User Markets, 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-2: Smart Window Glass and Film Market by Technologies, 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-3: Smart Window Glass and Film Market by Geographical Region, 2013-2020 ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-635 PUBLISHED May 24, 2013
Markets for Radiation Detection Equipment
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Emerging Electronics
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    21st century civilization will rely more and more on effectively harnessing and developing the technologies that ionizing radiation has to offer. Even if weapons and power plants went away in the next 100 years, humanity would still rely on ionizing radiation to diagnose and treat disease, deliver safe food, and seek out carbon based energy sources. Sensors would still be employed in transportation corridors, shipping vehicles, and boarder security. Radiation detection, like the integrated circuit, may be mature technology, but it continues to deliver value and evolve with changing needs.

    NanoMarkets broke new ground with our report on radiation detection materials, but those materials are only part of the radiation sensor story. NanoMarkets now moves downstream to the devices themselves to see how the evolution of new material technologies and data processing intersect with the trends in the end-markets to deliver new form-factors, better performance, and lower cost. This report illustrates the trends in radiation sensors employed in four key applications arenas: medical detection and imaging, nuclear security and safety, energy and industrial applications, and scientific measurement and testing.

    Within this report, NanoMarkets delivers eight-year forecasts for key sensors used in radiation detection applications, such as medical gamma cameras, RIIDS, portal monitors, PET detectors, oil exploration and scientific sensors (et.al.). All demand forecasts are segmented by device type and world region. Readers of this report will understand macro-market drivers affecting technological changes and understand where technology push may be forcing disruptive changes. Key participant organizations will be profiled to illustrate their strategies and needs in this diverse market.

    NanoMarkets believes that executives and entrepreneurs, business development and product development professionals, as well as investors and inventors involved with radiation sensor equipment OEMs, electronics or materials providers, as well as device end users, will benefit from this comprehensive analysis.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Opportunities in Radiation Detection Equipment
    E.1.1 Opportunities in Medical Radiology Devices
    E.1.2 Opportunities in Nuclear Medical Devices
    E.1.3 Opportunities in Homeland Security and Military Applications
    E.1.4 Opportunities in Industrial and Occupational Safety (Including Nuclear Energy)
    E.1.5 Opportunities in Custom Detectors
    E.2 Opportunities at the Intersection of Materials and Detectors
    E.2.1 Challenges for Inorganic Scintillation Materials
    E.2.2 Challenges for Semiconductors
    E.2.3 Challenges for Other Emerging Materials
    E.3 Companies to Watch
    E.4 Summary of NanoMarkets' Eight-Year Forecasts for Radiation Detection Equipment

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to This Report
    1.1.1 Radiation Equipment Market Characterized by Diversity
    1.1.2  Current Market Drivers for Radiation Detection Equipment
    1.1.3 Detection Choice and Market Segmentation
    1.1.4 New Opportunities and New Companies
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology
    1.3.1 Data Sources
    1.3.2 Forecasting Methodology
    1.4 Plan of This Report

    Chapter Two: Medical Applications Part I: Medical X-Ray Detectors
    2.1 Radiography: Film to Digital
    2.1.1 Computed Radiography
    2.1.2 Digital Radiography
    2.1.3 Drivers in Digital Radiography
    2.1.4 Is DR Growing or Shrinking?
    2.2 Densitometry
    2.2.1 Bone Density Technology
    2.2.2 Market and Trends
    2.3 Computed Tomography
    2.3.1 Slices of Life
    2.3.2 Radiation Detectors for CT
    2.3.3 The Money in CT
    2.3.4 Radiation Dose Drivers in CT
    2.3.5 Regulation, the Slice Wars, and the State of the Art
    2.3.6 The Rise of Volumetric CT
    2.3.7 Opportunities in Volumetric CT
    2.4 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Medical Applications Part II: Medical Detectors for Gamma Radiation
    3.1 Nuclear Medicine
    3.1.1  Techniques in Nuclear Medicine
    3.1.2  Segmentation in Nuclear Medicine
    3.1.3  Population Drivers
    3.1.4  Health and Safety Drivers
    3.1.5  Receding Medicare Reimbursements
    3.1.6  Emerging Technology Drivers in Nuclear Medicine
    3.2 Gamma Cameras
    3.2.1 Anger Cameras
    3.2.2 Anger Management: Technology Alternatives
    3.2.3  Holding On to the Anger
    3.3 Combined SPECT Techniques
    3.3.1 SPECT/CT
    3.3.2  SPECT/MRI
    3.4 PET Detectors
    3.4.1 PET/CT
    3.4.2 The New Breed of PETs
    3.4.3 PET Scintillators
    3.4.4 PET/MRI
    3.5 SPECT/CT vs. PET/CT: Who wins?
    3.6 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Four: Nuclear Safety, Homeland Security, and Military Detectors
    4.1 Ionizing Radiation: A Primer
    4.2  Radiation Safety, Measurement, and Interrogation Devices
    4.2.1 Passive Radiation Safety Devices
    4.2.2 Active Radiation Safety Devices
    4.3 Technology Trends in Radiation Detection and Safety Devices
    4.3.1 Personal Spectroscopy
    4.3.2 Better Resolution
    4.3.3 Fantastic Plastics
    4.4 Nuclear Energy Safety and Trends
    4.4.1 Fukushima Today
    4.4.2 Operational Nuclear Facilities
    4.4.3 Nations with Nuclear Anxieties
    4.4.4 Feeding the Dragon
    4.4.5 New Nukes
    4.4.6 Market Growth and Direction
    4.5 Nuclear Terrorism: Monitoring and Response
    4.5.1 Assaulting Nuclear Facilities
    4.5.2 Nuclear Smuggling
    4.5.3 Weapons of Mass Disruption
    4.5.4 Economic Impacts of Nuclear Terror
    4.5.5 Homeland Security
    4.5.6 Costs
    4.5.7  Military and Defense
    4.6 Industry Dynamics
    4.6.1 Portal Monitoring Players
    4.6.2 Additional Manufacturers of Radiation Security Equipment
    4.6.3 Consolidation?
    4.7 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Five: Industrial, Occupational, and Scientific Applications of Radiation Detectors
    5.1 Occupational and Institutional Radiation Safety
    5.1.1 Personal and Responder Risk
    5.1.2 Medical and Research Radiation Safety
    5.1.3 Food Irradiation
    5.1.4 Scrap Metal Recycling
    5.2 Industrial Radiography
    5.2.1 Good Bye Gamma
    5.2.2 Neutron Inspection
    5.2.3 Detectors for X-Ray NDT
    5.2.4 CT in NDT
    5.2.5 Copy and Paste Manufacturing
    5.3 Oil and Mineral Exploration
    5.3.1 Overall Oil and Gas Outlook
    5.3.2 Resource Exploration Challenges
    5.3.3 Waste and Safety Considerations
    5.4 Big Physics
    5.4.1 Cosmology
    5.4.2 High Energy Physics
    5.5 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Six: Eight Year Forecasts for Radiation Detection Equipment
    6.1 Introduction and Forecasting Methodology
    6.1.1 Differences with Other NanoMarkets Reports
    6.1.2 Market Segments and Detectors Covered
    6.1.3 Key Assumptions
    6.1.4 Sources of Data
    6.2 Forecast for Radiation Detection Equipment by Type of Detector
    6.2.1 Global Forecasts
    6.2.2 Price Schedule for Different Radiation Detectors
    6.2.3 Regional Forecasts
    6.2.4 Market Sizes for Specific Safety and Monitoring Radiation Detectors
    6.3 Forecast for Radiation Detection Equipment by Market Segment
    6.3.1 Medical Diagnostic Market Segments
    6.3.2 Radiation Detectors for Nuclear Energy Markets
    6.3.3 Radiation Detectors for Homeland Security
    6.3.4 Radiation Detectors for Military Applications
    6.3.5 Radiation Detectors for Institutional and Occupational Safety
    6.3.6 Radiation Detectors for Oil and Mineral Exploration
    6.3.7 Radiation Detection for Big Physics
    6.3.8 Radiation Detection for Industrial Inspection
    6.4 Alternative Scenarios

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits


    Exhibit E-1: Potential Example Segmentation of the Radiation Detector Market
    Exhibit E-2: The Explosion in Discovery of High Performance Scintillators
    Exhibit E-3: Summary of Eight Year Global Forecasts for Radiation Detectors US$ Millions
    Exhibit E-4: Radiation Detectors By Market Sub-Segment US$ Millions
    Exhibit 1-1: Design Considerations of Radiation Detection Equipmen
    Exhibit 2-1: Product Selection Criteria of Film vs. Digital
    Exhibit 2-2: Product Selection Parameters of DCR  vs. IDCR
    Exhibit 2-3: Clinical Utility of CT Scanning
    Exhibit 2-4: Radiation Exposure Dangers for x-ray Diagnostic Techniques
    Exhibit 3-1: Applications of Nuclear Medicine
    Exhibit 3-2: Advantages of SPECT and PET for Nuclear Medical Procedures
    Exhibit 3-3: Potential Radiation Dosages from Different Nuclear Medical Procedures
    Exhibit 3-4:  Relative Performance Characteristics of other Scintillators vs.
    NaI for Gamma Camera Applications
    Exhibit 3-5: New Radiopharmaceuticals Approved or Seeking FDA approval for PET
    Exhibit 4-1: Radiation Exposure sources for an Average U.S. Citizen
    Exhibit 4-2: Partial List of Nations Building or Planning New Reactors within the Forecast Period
    Exhibit 4-3:  State of Success of DHS Portal Monitor Programs and Gaps Analysis
    Exhibit 5-1: Minimal Personal Radiation Detection Needs in Occupational Radiation Safety
    Exhibit 5-2: Selected Food Irradiations and Allowed Doses
    Exhibit 5-3: Effective Utility of Industrial Radiography Techniques
    Exhibit 6-1: Total of All Radiation Detectors Over All Market Segments ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-2: Total Market for all Medical Diagnostic Applications ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-3: Total of all Safety Security Detectors Over All Segments ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-4: Total of all Specialty/Custom Radiation Detectors $ Millions
    Exhibit 6-5: Average Unit Price for Medical X-Ray Detectors by Type  ($/Unit)
    Exhibit 6-6: Average Unit Price for Nuclear Medical Detectors by Type ($/Unit)
    Exhibit 6-7: Average Unit Price for Security and  Monitoring Detectors by Type ($/Unit)
    Exhibit 6-8: Average Unit Price for Specialty and Custom Detectors by Type,  Less Big Physics ($/Unit)
    Exhibit 6-9: Regional Markets for Medical Diagnostic Detectors ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-10: Regional Markets for Security and Monitoring Detectors ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-11: Regional Markets for Specialty and Custom Detectors ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-12: PRD/SPRD Market by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-13: Dosimeter Market by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-14: Area Monitors Market by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-15: Survey Meters Market by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-16: RIIDs Market by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-17: Backpack Spectrometer Market by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 6-18: Portal Monitors Market by Application
    Exhibit 6-19: The Market for Medical Radiography Detectors
    Exhibit 6-20: The Market for Medical Computed Tomography Radiography Detectors
    Exhibit 6-21: The Market for Medical  SPECT Detectors
    Exhibit 6-22: The Market for Medical  PET Detectors
    Exhibit 6-23: The Market for Radiation Detectors for Nuclear Power
    Exhibit 6-24: The Market for Radiation Detectors for Homeland Security
    Exhibit 6-25: The Market for Radiation Detectors for Military Applications
    Exhibit 6-26: The Market for Radiation Detectors for Medical and Academic Safety
    Exhibit 6-27: The Market for Radiation Detectors for Food Irradiation Safety
    Exhibit 6-28: The Market for Radiation Detectors for Scrap Metal Recyclers
    Exhibit 6-29: The Market for Radiation Detectors for Oil and Mineral Exploration
    Exhibit 6-30: The Market for Radiation Detectors for Big Physics
    Exhibit 6-31: The Market for Radiation Detectors for Industrial Radiography

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-629 PUBLISHED May 15, 2013
OLED Materials Markets 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • OLEDs
  • SUMMARY

    This report is the latest update from NanoMarkets on the OLED materials markets. In it, we quantify the opportunities that are emerging for materials suppliers, where the key determinants of long-term success will be improving performance while also reducing the total cost of ownership. We also analyze recent developments in the OLED materials supply chain; for example, we discuss how the geographical center of OLEDs is shifting towards Korea, and we discuss changes in strategy and product portfolios of key materials firms like UDC, DuPont, Cheil, Novaled, and Sumitomo.

    The report contains detailed volume and revenue forecasts for materials used for OLEDs broken out by application, material type, functionality, and deposition method wherever possible.  NanoMarkets has been providing industry analysis of the OLED materials market for six years, and it is the leading supplier of analysis in the OLED lighting space.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Changes in the OLED Market Since Our Last Report
    E.1.1 Small Displays Are Growing Fast
    E.1.2 OLED TVs Have Arrived
    E.1.3 OLED Lighting's Struggle to Get Off the Ground
    E.2 The Role of Materials – Technology Improvements and Remaining Technology Gaps
    E.2.1 State-of-the-Art in Materials Performance
    E.2.2 The Importance of Shifting to Solution Processing
    E.3 The OLED Materials Supply Chain
    E.3.1 Influential OLED Manufacturers
    E.3.2 Consolidation of Power in the Materials Space
    E.4 Summaries of OLED Materials Eight-Year Forecasts

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 OLEDs Today:  The Three Key Markets
    1.1.1 Small Displays are Booming
    1.1.2 OLED TVs Have Arrived
    1.1.3 OLED Lighting: Big Potential But Still Risky
    1.2 Translating the Growing OLED Market into Opportunities for OLED Materials
    1.2.1 OLED Materials: A Growing Business Sector
    1.2.2 Key Market Issues for OLED Materials Suppliers
    1.2.3 Technology Gaps in Today's Materials
    1.3 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.4 Methodology and Information Sources for this Report
    1.5 Plan of This Report

    Chapter Two: Addressable Markets for OLED Materials
    2.1 OLED Displays
    2.1.1 Small and Medium Displays
    2.1.2 Getting to Larger Panels—Scaling Up and the Importance of  OLED TVs
    2.1.3 Process Changes in OLED Manufacturing – Solution Processing for Future Displays
    2.1.4 Display Materials
    2.1.5 Influential OLED Display Firms Shaping Materials Needs
    2.1.6 Panel Area Forecasts for OLED Displays by Application
    2.1.7 OLED Display Panel Area Forecasts by Substrate Type and Deposition Technology
    2.2 OLED Lighting Markets
    2.2.1 Five Materials Factors That Shape the Prospects for OLED Lighting– Efficiency, Lifetime, Brightness, Panel Size, and Cost
    2.2.2 What Happens if OLED Lighting Stays in Luxury Markets?
    2.2.3 Influential OLED Lighting Firms
    2.2.4 Panel Area Forecasts for OLED Lighting
    2.3 Summary of Panel Area Forecasts for OLED Displays and Lighting 2013-2020
    2.4 Key Points in This Chapter

    Chapter Three: Key Suppliers of OLED Materials
    3.1 Changes in the Supply Chain
    3.1.1 Acquisition and Consolidation
    3.1.2 Intellectual Property Matters
    3.2 Universal Display Corporation's Central Role
    3.3 Updates from Other American Firms
    3.3.1 Dow
    3.3.2 DuPont Displays
    3.3.3 Plextronics
    3.4 Japanese OLED Materials Players
    3.4.1 Idemitsu Kosan
    3.4.2 Mitsubishi and Pioneer
    3.4.3 Sumitomo and Polymer OLEDs
    3.5 European Firms
    3.5.1 BASF
    3.5.2 Merck/EMD
    3.5.3 Novaled: Acquisition Target of Korean Suppliers
    3.5.4 Other European Materials Suppliers
    3.6 The Rise of Korea
    3.6.1 Doosan
    3.6.2 Duksan Hi-Metal
    3.6.3 Samsung and Cheil
    3.6.4 Other Korean Firms
    3.7 Up-and-Coming Chinese Suppliers

    Chapter Four: OLED Materials and Eight-Year Market Forecasts
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology and Assumptions
    4.1.1 General Methodology & Scope
    4.1.2 Changes from Last Year's Forecast
    4.1.3 OLED Materials Pricing Assumptions
    4.1.4 Economic Assumptions
    4.1.5 Alternative Scenarios
    4.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Emissive Layer Materials
    4.2.1 Emitters and Hosts in OLED Displays
    4.2.2 Emitters and Hosts in OLED Lighting
    4.2.3 Summary of Forecasts for Emissive Layer Materials
    4.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electron Transport Materials
    4.3.1 ETLs in OLED Displays
    4.3.2 ETLs in OLED Lighting
    4.3.3 Summary of Forecasts for ETL Materials in OLEDs
    4.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Hole Transport, Hole Blocking, and Electron Blocking Materials
    4.4.1 HTL/HBL/EBL Materials in OLED Displays
    4.4.2 HTL/HBL/EBL Materials in OLED Lighting
    4.4.3 Summary of HTL/HBL/EBL Materials
    4.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Hole Injection Layer Materials
    4.5.1 HIL Materials in OLED Displays
    4.5.2 HIL Materials in OLED Lighting
    4.5.3 Summary of HIL Materials
    4.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Electrode Materials in OLEDs
    4.6.1 Cathode Materials
    4.6.2 Anode Materials
    4.6.3 Summary of Forecasts for Electrodes in OLEDs
    4.7 OLED Encapsulation Material Forecasts
    4.8 Eight-Year Forecasts of Substrates in OLEDs
    4.8.1 Materials Used As OLED Substrates
    4.8.2 Substrates in OLED Displays
    4.8.3 Substrates in OLED Lighting
    4.8.4 Summaries of Forecasts for Substrates in OLEDs–Glass, Plastic, and Metal
    4.9 Summaries of Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Materials
    4.9.1 Summaries of Forecasts for Core Functional OLED Materials
    4.9.2 Grand Total Summaries of All OLED Materials

    Acronyms and Abbreviations
    About the Author


    List of Exhibits


    Exhibit E-1: Overview of OLED "State-of-the-Art" Characteristics
    Exhibit E-2: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of OLED Materials by Material Type and by Application 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Common OLED Auxiliary Materials
    Exhibit 2-2: OLED Analysis of the OLED Display Market 2013-2020
    Exhibit 2-3:  Analysis of the Total Area of the OLED Display Market 2013-2020
    Exhibit 2-4: OLED Displays by Substrate Type and Material Type 2013-2020 (OLED Panel Area, Millions m2)
    Exhibit 2-5: Overview of Flexible and Conformable Display Applications
    Exhibit 2-6: Overview of OLED Lighting "State-of-the-Art" Characteristics
    Exhibit 2-7:  Overview of Other Influential Firms in the OLED Space
    Exhibit 2-8: OLED Lighting Shipments Area 2013-2020 (OLED Panel Area, Millions m2)
    Exhibit 2-9: OLED Lighting Manufactured by Substrate Type and Material Type 2013-2020 (OLED Panel Area, Millions m2)
    Exhibit 2-10: OLED Panel Area Manufactured by Application Category 2013-2020 (OLED Panel Area, Million m2)
    Exhibit 2-11: OLED Panel Area Manufactured by Panel Type 2013-2020 (OLED Panel Area, Million m2)
    Exhibit 2-12: OLED Panel Area Manufactured by Material and Deposition Technology 2013-2020 (OLED Panel Area, Millions m2)
    Exhibit 3-1: Overview of Selected UDC OLED Materials
    Exhibit 3-2: Selected UDC Licensees and Partners for Lighting Applications
    Exhibit 3-3: Selected UDC Licensees and Partners in OLED Materials
    Exhibit 3-4: Selected UDC Licensees and Partners for Display Applications
    Exhibit 3-5: Overview of DuPont Displays Product Portfolio
    Exhibit 3-6: Overview of Materials Under Development at Idemitsu Kosan
    Exhibit 3-7: Overview of livilux OLED Materials from Merck
    Exhibit 3-8: Overview of Other Notable OLED Materials Firms in Europe
    Exhibit 3-9: Overview of Doosan's OLED Materials Portfolio
    Exhibit 3-10: Overview of Other Notable Korean OLED Materials Firms
    Exhibit 4-1: Estimated Average OLED Functional Materials Prices, 2012 - 2019 ($/g)
    Exhibit 4-2: Estimated Average Materials Costs of Different Layers in OLED Displays, 2013 - 2020 ($/m2)
    Exhibit 4-3: Estimated Average Materials Costs of Different Layers in OLED Lighting, 2013 - 2020 ($/m2)
    Exhibit 4-4: Quantity and Value of Vapor-Deposited Small Molecule Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-5: Quantity and Value of Solution-Processed Small Molecule Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-6: Quantity and Value of Light-Emitting Polymers (LEPs) in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-7: Summary of Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Displays by Deposition Method 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-8: Summary of Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Displays by Material Type 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-9: Quantity and Value of Vapor-Deposited Small Molecule Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-10: Quantity and Value of Solution-Processed Small Molecule Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-11: Quantity and Value of Light-Emitting Polymers (LEPs) in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-12: Summary of Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Lighting by Deposition Method 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-13: Summary of Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Lighting by Material Type 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-14: Summary:  Quantity of Emissive Layer Materials in OLEDs 2013-2020 (kg)
    Exhibit 4-15: Summary: Market Value of Emissive Layer Materials in OLEDs 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-16: Quantity and Market Value of ETL Materials in Vapor-Deposited Small Molecule OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-17: Quantity and Market Value of ETL Materials in Solution-Processed Small Molecule OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-18: Summary of ETL Materials in OLED Displays by Deposition Method 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-19: Quantity and Market Value of ETL Materials in Vapor-Deposited Small Molecule OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-20: Quantity and Market Value of ETL Materials in Solution-Processed Small Molecule OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-21: Summary of ETL Materials in OLED Lighting by Deposition Method 2013-2020 1
    Exhibit 4-22: Summary: Quantity of ETL Materials in OLEDs 2013-2020 (kg)
    Exhibit 4-23: Summary: Market Value of ETL Materials in OLEDs 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-24: Quantity and Market Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in Vapor-Deposited Small Molecule OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-25: Quantity and Market Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in Solution-Processed Small Molecule OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-26: Quantity and Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in Polymer OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-27: Summary of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-28: Quantity and Market Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in Vapor-Deposited Small Molecule OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-29: Quantity and Market Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in Solution-Processed Small Molecule OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-30: Quantity and Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in Polymer OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-31: Summary of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-32: Summary: Quantity of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in OLEDs 2013-2020 (kg)
    Exhibit 4-33: Summary: Market Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in OLEDs 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-34: Quantity and Market Value of HIL Materials in Vapor-Deposited Small Molecule OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-35: Quantity and Market Value of HIL Materials1 in Solution-Processed Small Molecule OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-36: Quantity and Market Value of HIL Materials in Polymer OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-37: Summary of HIL Materials in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-38: Quantity and Market Value of HIL Materials in Vapor-Deposited Small Molecule OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-39: Quantity and Market Value of HIL Materials1 in Solution-Processed Small Molecule OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-40: Quantity and Market Value of HIL Materials in Polymer OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-41: Summary of HIL Materials in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-42: Summary: Quantity of HIL Materials in OLEDs 2013-2020 (kg)
    Exhibit 4-43: Summary: Market Value of HIL Materials in OLEDs 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-44: Cathode Area and Market Value in OLEDs by Application 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-45: Anode1 Area and Market Value in OLEDs by Application 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-46: Summary of Area and Market Value of Electrodes in OLEDs 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-47: Encapsulation1 Area and Value in OLEDs by Application 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-48: Conventional (Rigid) Glass Substrate Area and Value in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-49: Flexible Glass Substrate Area and Value in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-50: Plastic Substrate Area and Value in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-51: Metal Foil Substrate Area and Value in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-52: Summary of Substrate Area and Value in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-53: Conventional (Rigid) Glass Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-54: Flexible Glass Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-55: Plastic Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-56: Metal Foil Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-57: Summary of Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-58: Summary: Substrate Area in OLEDs by Substrate Material and by Application 2013-2020 (Millions m2)
    Exhibit 4-59: Summary: Market Value of Substrates in OLEDs by Material and by Application 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-60: Comparison of Market Values of Core Functional Materials in OLED Displays Fabricated with Different Material Types, Fabrication Methods, and/or Deposition Methods1 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-61: Comparison of Market Shares (Value Basis) of Core Functional OLED Materials in OLED Displays Fabricated with Different Material Types, Fabrication Methods, and/or Deposition Mehods1 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-62: Comparison of Market Values of Core Functional OLED Materials in OLED Lighting Fabricated with Different Material Types, Fabrication Methods, and/or Deposition Mehods1 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-63: Comparison of Market Shares (Value Basis) of Core Functional OLED Materials in OLED Lighting Fabricated with Different Material Types, Fabrication Methods, and/or Deposition Mehods1 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-64: Comparison of Market Values of Core Functional OLED Materials in OLEDs Fabricated with Different Material Types, Fabrication Methods, and/or Deposition Mehods1 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-65: Comparison of Market Shares (Value Basis) of Core Functional OLED Materials in OLEDs Fabricated with Different Material Types, Fabrication Methods, and/or Deposition Methods1 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-66: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of Materials in OLED Displays by Material Type 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-67: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of Materials in OLED Displays by Material Category 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-68: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of OLED Materials in Lighting by Material Type 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-69: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of OLED Materials in Lighting by Material Category 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-70: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of OLED Materials 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-71: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of OLED Materials by Material Category 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-72: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of OLED Materials by Application 2013-2020  ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-625 PUBLISHED May 01, 2013
Smart Lighting Markets and Opportunities 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Emerging Electronics
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    This report is NanoMarkets’ latest analysis of the worldwide smart lighting market.  Revenues from smart lighting are expected to escalate rapidly in the coming decade, driven primarily by rising energy costs.  However, NanoMarkets believes that the biggest wins in the smart lighting business will go to those who can differentiate themselves in the market by offering value-added features and interfaces to other building automation systems. 

    As it happens, it is becoming increasingly easy to achieve such differentiation.  The latest lighting research indicates that smart lighting can also lead to improved health and mood, while newer technology is showing the way to using smart lighting systems for air quality monitoring and even the delivery of information services.  At the same time, improved control algorithms will permit the basic lighting management functionality of smart lighting to be performed much more effectively.

    With these important developments in mind, this NanoMarkets’ report offers guidance on where new smart lighting business revenues will be generated over the next few years and beyond.  The report builds on NanoMarkets’ previous smart lighting report published in 2012 as well as on our seven-year experience of analyzing the solid-state lighting industry.

    In this year’s report, we have considerably extended the report coverage to include analysis beyond the energy-saving features of smart lighting to other business opportunities that the arrival of smart lighting is creating.  But as with NanoMarkets previous report on smart lighting, this report shows how new value is being created in the lighting market by adding enhanced electronics and intelligent luminaires and how such product strategies will be able to build on the massive trend towards introducing LED lighting. 

    Also included in this new report is an analysis of the smart lighting strategies of the firms that NanoMarkets expects to see as major players in the smart lighting space.  We examine what the prospects for start-ups are in this space.  In addition, there is an eight-year market forecast with breakouts by type of product, end user market segment, and the regions/countries where this report will be sold.

    NanoMarkets believes that this report will provide much needed data and strategic analysis for planners and marketers throughout the lighting, semiconductor, sensor and networking industries.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 What has Changed Since NanoMarkets' Last Report on Smart Lighting:  Two Generations of Smart Lighting
    E.1.1 No Money from Old Lights:  Generation 0
    E.1.2 First Generation Smart Lighting:  The New PBX?
    E.1.3 Possibilities for Second Generation Smart Lighting
    E.2 Smart Lighting Systems as a Networking Technology
    E.3 Opportunity Analysis of Smart Lighting by Type of User
    E.4  Some Risks to Consider for Smart Lighting Manufacturers
    E.5 Smart Lighting Systems Marketing Strategies
    E.6 The Making of the Smart Lighting Industry:  Firms and Sectors to Watch
    E.6.1 Smart Lighting Start-Up Strategies
    E.6.2 Channel and Partnership Factors
    E.7 Summary of Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Lighting Systems

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Energy Efficiency:  Prime Mover for Smart Lighting
    1.1.2 New Functions for Smart Lighting Allow Market Differentiation
    1.1.3 Enabling Technologies on the Brink
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Smart Lighting System Product and Technology Evolution
    2.1 The Shifting Meaning of Smart Lighting
    2.2 Generation 0 Smart Lighting:  Occupancy Sensing and Daylighting
    2.2.1 Occupancy Sensing
    2.2.2  Daylight Sensing
    2.2.3  Time Clocking
    2.2.4  Interfaces to Building Automation Systems
    2.3 Generation 1 Smart Lighting Systems:  Smart Ballasts and Beyond
    2.3.1 Expansion of Ballast Functionality
    2.3.2 Intelligent Ballast Suppliers
    2.4 Generation 1 Smart Lighting Systems: Central Controllers as Early Competitive Battlefield for Smart Lighting
    2.4.1 Possible Technology Innovations in Smart Lighting Controllers
    2.4.2 Scalability and Modularity Options for Smart Lighting Controllers
    2.4.3  Market Specialization
    2.4.4 Internet Access and Protocol Openness as a Future Strategy in the Smart Lighting Market
    2.5 Other Competitive Factors in Today's Smart Lighting Systems
    2.5.1 Standard Competitive Factors for Generation 1 Smart Lighting Systems
    2.5.2 Broadening the Market Scope of Smart Lighting Systems Management
    2.6 Generation 2 Smart Lighting Systems:  Where Energy Efficiency Meets Health and Mood
    2.6.1 Recent Research on the Human Impact of Light and Light Changes
    2.6.2 Implications of Current Research for Smart Lighting Systems Opportunities
    2.6.3 Color Tuning and the Need for Dynamic Mood and Health Lighting
    2.7 Generation 3 Lighting Systems: Visible Light Communications
    2.7.1 Evolution of Li-Fi Technology
    2.7.2 Lighting-Related Applications for VLC/Li-Fi
    2.7.3 The Downside of VLC/Li-Fi
    2.8 Smart Lighting Software
    2.8.1 Smart Lighting Systems Software Functionality
    2.8.2 Smart Lighting and Clouds
    2.9 Specialist Chips for the Smart Lighting Industry
    2.9.1 Smart Lighting Chips and the Semiconductor Industry
    2.10 Smart Lighting Sensors
    2.10.1 Smart Lighting from the Sensor Manufacturers Perspective
    2.10.2 Sensors, Lighting and Nanotechnology
    2.10.3 ZigBee and Smart Lighting
    2.10.4 EnOcean
    2.11 Smart Lighting and Smart Grids
    2.11.1 Demand Response and Smart Lighting
    2.11.2 DALI
    2.11.3 Examples of Smart Grid/Smart Lighting Integration
    2.12 Smart Lighting, Building Automation and Other Standards
    2.12.1 Standards for Integration with Building Automation Systems
    2.12.2 Other Protocols Worth Considering
    2.13 A Final Note on Smart Lighting, New Materials and OLEDs
    2.14 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Smart Lighting System Market Drivers and Other Factors Shaping the Smart Lighting Market
    3.1 Energy Efficiency:  First Mover for Smart Lighting Systems
    3.1.1 Policy and Social Context for Smart Lighting
    3.1.2 How Dimming Issues May Help Promote Smart Lighting Systems
    3.1.3 How Smart Lighting Systems May Enable Luminaire Firms Benefit from Demand for Energy Efficiency
    3.2 Consumer Psychology and Smart Lighting Purchases
    3.2.1 Economics and Consumer Choice in Smart Lighting Systems
    3.3 Lighting Systems and Aging Populations
    3.4 Information Services and the Need for Generation 3 Smart Lighting
    3.5 Factors Retarding the Use of Smart Lighting Systems
    3.5.1 Cost and Supply Chain Issues
    3.5.2 Use of Natural Light
    3.5.3  State of the Worldwide Construction Industry:  Retrofits and New Construction
    3.6 United States Markets for Energy-Efficient Lighting Systems
    3.6.1 Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and Other Related Codes
    3.6.2 Energy Policy Act of 2005
    3.6.3 Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).
    3.6.4 Other Factors
    3.7 Japanese Markets for Energy-Efficient Lighting Systems
    3.7.1  Factors Driving Early Markets for LED/Smart Lighting in Japan
    3.7.2 Regulatory and Legal Environment
    3.8 Chinese Markets for Energy-Efficient Lighting Systems
    3.8.1 Energy Usage in China:  Current and Future
    3.8.2 Phasing out of Traditional Light Bulbs in China
    3.9 Korea Markets for Energy-Efficient Lighting Systems
    3.9.1 Impact of Government Energy and Industrial Policy
    3.10 Taiwanese Markets for Energy-Efficient Lighting Systems
    3.11 Indian Markets for Energy-Efficient Lighting Systems
    3.12 Energy-Efficient Lighting Systems Markets in Other Parts of Asia
    3.13 European Markets for Energy-Efficient Lighting
    3.13.1 Rules for Phasing Out Incandescent Bulbs in the EU
    3.13.2 Efforts at the National Level
    3.14 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Four: Markets for Smart Lighting – An Eight-Year Market Forecast
    4.1 Methodology of this Forecast
    4.1.1 Addressable Markets
    4.1.2 Matters of Definition
    4.1.3 Data Sources and Assumptions about Market Size and Penetration
    4.1.4 Products Forecast
    4.1.5 Differences From Last Year’s Forecasts
    4.2 Residential Buildings
    4.2.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting in Residential Markets
    4.3 Commercial and Industrial Buildings
    4.3.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting in Commercial and Industrial Buildings
    4.3.2  Smart Lighting in Industrial Buildings
    4.4 Government and Public Buildings
    4.5 Smart Street Lighting and Other Smart Outdoor Lighting
    4.5.1 Street Lighting
    4.5.2 Other Outdoor Lighting
    4.5.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting in Street Lighting and Other Outdoor Lighting
    4.6 Smart Lighting Systems for Automobiles and Other Forms of Transportation
    4.6.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting in Automobiles and Other Forms of Transportation
    4.7 Smart Lighting Systems for Other Applications:  Urban Farming and Hospitals
    4.8 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Markets:  By Type of Application, Product, and Generation
    4.9 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Lighting Systems Revenues by Country and Region
    4.10 The Importance of the Retrofit Market for Smart Lighting
    4.11 Key Points from this Chapter

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Smart Lighting Markets – Product Generations and Opportunities
    Exhibit E-2: Business Case for the Current Generation of Smart Lighting
    Exhibit E-3: Requirements and Opportunities for Smart Lighting Systems, by End User Segment
    Exhibit E-4: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Revenues by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Smart Lighting Systems Generations
    Exhibit 2-2: Design/Technology for Automation Controllers
    Exhibit 2-3: Two Scenarios for Smart Lighting Connectivity to the Internet
    Exhibit 2-4: Possible Markets for Dynamic Mood and Health Lighting Systems
    Exhibit 4-1: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Shipments to Residential Real Estate Markets
    Exhibit 4-2: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Shipments to Commercial and Industrial Real Estate Markets
    Exhibit 4-3: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Shipments to Government and Public Building Markets
    Exhibit 4-4: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Shipments for Streetlights and other Outdoor Lighting Markets
    Exhibit 4-5: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Shipments for Transportation Markets
    Exhibit 4-6: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Revenues by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-7: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Revenues by Product Type ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-8: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Revenues by Technology Generation  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-9:  Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Lighting Revenues by Geography ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-631 PUBLISHED April 19, 2013
Radiation Detection Materials Markets-2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Emerging Electronics
  • SUMMARY

    This report identifies the latest opportunities for radiation detection materials and especially those that have emerged since NanoMarkets groundbreaking report on this topic in 2011.  

    While the materials discussed in this report are similar to those that NanoMarkets covered in the previous report, this report analyzes the commercial significance of the latest improvements in the materials covered.  However, a particular focus of this year’s report is how the opportunities for radiation materials are likely to change in the light of latest developments in end user sectors.  For example, we take a look at how demand for radiation detection materials may change in the light of the waning of the nuclear power industry, changing healthcare policies and shifting military and national security priorities.  In each of these applications – and in others – this report examines which materials can best capitalize on the available opportunities, now and in the future.

    Both scintillation and semiconductor radiation detection materials are covered in this report in which we show how improving costs and performance is helping to increase the addressable markets for these materials.   As with all NanoMarkets reports, the new analysis of the radiation detection materials markets contains a granular eight year forecast, broken down by application and type of material.  These forecasts are provided in terms of both revenues ($ millions) and volume (cubic centimeters sold).  In addition, this report provides an assessment of the product/market strategies of the key firms active in the radiation detection materials sector.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Current Status of Radiation Detection Materials:  Industry and Markets
    E1.1 The 3He Crisis and the Need to Find New Neutron Detection Materials
    E.1.2 Scintillation Radiation Detection Materials and Applications
    E.1.3 Semiconducting Radiation Detection Materials and Applications
    E.2 Radiation Detection Materials Opportunity Profile
    E.2.1 Opportunities for 3He Substitutes for Neutron Detection Applications
    E.2.2 Opportunities for Low-Cost Radiation Detection Materials
    E.2.3 Opportunities for High-Performance Radiation Detection Materials
    E.2.4 Longer-term Opportunities for Radiation Detection Materials
    E.3 Key Firms to Watch
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for Radiation Detection Materials

    Chapter One:  Introduction
    1.1 Background to This Report
    1.1.1 The 3He Crisis and the Need to Find New Neutron Detection Materials
    1.1.2 Scintillations and Semiconductors
    1.1.3 Medical Imaging Markets
    1.1.4 9/11 and After: Homeland Security Markets for Radiation Detection Materials
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two:  Current and Future Factors Shaping the Radiation Detection Materials Market
    2.1 Application Trends Impacting Demand for Novel Radiation Detection Materials
    2.1.1 Medical
    2.1.2 Domestic Security
    2.1.3 Military
    2.1.4 Nuclear Power
    2.1.5 Geophysical Applications
    2.1.6 Industural and other Applications
    2.2 Industry Structure Analysis from a Materials Perspective
    2.2.1 Current and Future Materials Requirements for Device Makers
    2.2.2 Market Developments and Trends at the Crystal Growers
    2.2.3 Opportunities for Suppliers of Raw Chemicals in the Radiation Detection Materials Space
    2.3 Analysis of Key R&D Trends in Radiation Detection Materials
    2.4 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Radiation Detection: Standard and Emerging Materials
    3.1 The Future of Sodium Iodide in Radiation Detection
    3.2 Market Opportunities for Newer Scintillation Radiation Detection Materials
    3.2.1 Lanthanum Bromide-Based Materials
    3.2.2 Cerium Bromide (CeBr3)
    3.2.3 CLYC (Cs2LiYCl6) based materials
    3.2.4 Cesium Iodide-Based Materials
    3.2.5 Strontium Iodide-Based Materials
    3.2.6 Fluoride Salt Scintillation Materials
    3.2.7 Oxide-Based Scintillation Materials
    3.2.8 Silicate-Based Scintillation Materials
    3.2.9 Yttrium-Based Scintillation Materials
    3.2.10 Nanocrystalline Scintillation Materials
    3.2.11 Plastic and Organic Polymer-Based Scintillation Materials
    3.3 Market Opportunities for Semiconductor Radiation Detector Materials
    3.3.1 Ge- and Si-Based Materials
    3.3.2 Telluride, Arsenide, and Phosphide based materials. 
    3.3.3 Aluminum Antimonide, Mercury Iodide and Other High Temperature Radiation Sensitive Materials
    3.4 Market Opportunities for Materials to Replace 3He for Neutron Detection.
    3.4.1 6Li based materials
    3.4.2 10B based materials
    3.4.3 Other Potential 3He Replacement Materials
    3.5 Key Points made in this Chapter

    Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts for Radiation Detector Materials
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology
    4.1.1 Data Sources
    4.1.2 Roadmap for Radiation Detector Materials Growth
    4.2 Eight-Year Forecast for Radiation Detector Materials
    4.2.1 Forecast by Radiation Detection Application

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Worldwide Radiation Detection Revenue ($ Millions)
    Exhibit E-2: Worldwide Radiation Detector Volume
    Exhibit E-3: Worldwide Radiation Detector Materials Revenue by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-1: Worldwide Radiation Detection Revenue ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-2: Worldwide Radiation Detector Volume
    Exhibit 4-3: Worldwide Scintillation Detector Revenue by Materials Type ($Millions)
    Exhibit 4-4: Worldwide Scintillation Detector Volumes by Materials Type
    Exhibit 4-5: Worldwide Semiconductor Detector Materials Revenue by Materials Type ($Millions)
    Exhibit 4-6: Worldwide Semiconductor Detector Material Volume by Materials Type
    Exhibit 4-7: Cost in $ per cm3 or cm2 of Scintillation Detection Materials
    Exhibit 4-8: Cost of Various Semiconducting Detector Materials ($ per cm2 or cm3)
    Exhibit 4-9: Worldwide Radiation Detector Revenue by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-10: Worldwide Radiation Detector Volume by Application
    Exhibit 4-11: NaI Revenue by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-12: NaI Volume (Millions of cm3) by Application
    Exhibit 4-13: CsI Crystalline Revenue by Application  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-14: CsI Crystalline Volume (Millions of cm3) by Application
    Exhibit 4-15: CsI Thin-Film Revenue by Application ($Millions)
    Exhibit 4-16: CsI Thin-Film Volume (Millions of cm2) by Application
    Exhibit 4-17: Lanthanum-Based (LaBr3/LaCl3) Revenue by Application  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-18: Lanthanum-Based (LaBr3/LaCl3) Volume (Millions of cm3) by Application
    Exhibit 4-19: Other Crystalline Simple Salt Detection Material Revenue by Application   ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-20: Other Crystalline Simple Salt Detection Material Volume (Millions of cm3) by Application)
    Exhibit 4-21: Oxide-Based Detection Materials (BGO/PbWO4/etc.) Revenue by Application   ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-22: Oxide-Based Detection Material (BGO/PbWO4/etc.) Volume (Millions of cm3) by Application
    Exhibit 4-23: Silicate-Based Detection Materials (LSO/BSO/etc.) Revenue by Application   ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-24: Silicate-Based Detection Materials (LSO/BSO/etc.) Volume  (Millions of cm3) by Application
    Exhibit 4-25: Yttrium-Based Scintillation Detection Material Revenue by Application  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-26: Yttrium-Based Scintillation Detection Material Volume (Millions of cm3) by Application
    Exhibit 4-27: Plastic/Polymer-Based Scintillation Detection Material Revenue by Application   ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-28: Plastic/Polymer-Based Scintillation Detection Material Volume (Millions of cm2) by Application
    Exhibit 4-29: CLYC-Based Scintillation Detection Material Revenue by Application  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-30: CLYC-Based Scintillation Detection Material Volume (Millions of cm3) by Application
    Exhibit 4-31: Nanocrystalline/Nanowire/etc. Detection Material Revenue by Application   ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-32: Nanocrystalline/Nanowire/etc. Detection Material Volume  (Thousands of cm2) by Application
    Exhibit 4-33: HPGe and Si-Based Detection Material Revenue by Application  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-34: HPGe and Si-Based Detection Material Volume (Thousands of cm2) by Application
    Exhibit 4-35: CdSe/CdTe/CdZnTe Revenue by Application  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-36: CdSe/CdTe/CdZnTe Volume (Thousands of cm2) by Application
    Exhibit 4-37: Gallium Arsenide Revenue by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-38: Gallium Arsenide Volume (Thousands of cm2) by Application
    Exhibit 4-39: Other Room Temperature Semiconducting Detection Materials Revenue   ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-40: Other Room Temperature Semiconducting Detection Materials Volume (Thousands of cm2) by Application
    Exhibit 4-41: Worldwide Radiation Detector Revenue by Region ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-42: Worldwide Radiation Detector Volumes by Region
    Exhibit 4-43: Revenue for 3he Substitute Materials
    Exhibit 4-44: 3He Substitute Material Volumes (boron tube area (cm2) and 6Li volume (thousands of cm3)
    Exhibit 4-45: Revenue for Boron Based 3He Substitute Materials by Application
    Exhibit 4-46: 3He Substitute Material Volumes (boron tube area (cm2) and Li6 Volume (thousands of cm3)) by Application

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-623 PUBLISHED March 05, 2013
OLED Lighting Market Forecast 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • OLEDs
  • SUMMARY

    NanoMarkets has been actively tracking the emerging OLED lighting sector now for more than six years, and this report is the latest in our ongoing series of industry analysis of the sector. In the report, we quantify the market opportunities for OLED lighting over the next eight years by providing granular volume and revenue forecasts for both OLED lighting panels and downstream OLED luminaires.

    As part of our analysis, we assess the OLED lighting supply chain, and we predict the likely pathways and time frames for commercialization of OLED lighting in different applications. We consider how the industry’s latest commercialization strategies and technical developments are influencing the prospects of this emerging market, and we examine the key players. Applications for OLED lighting covered by this report include:  luxury consumer lighting, decorative lighting for large buildings and showrooms, office lighting, residential lighting and automotive lighting. 

    The OLED lighting market continues to evolve from its earliest days of luxury luminaires and show pieces. Today, office lighting is expected to become a critical entry point for widespread commercialization, and automotive and residential lighting also represent major potential markets.  To realize the potential, however, several challenges remain, including the needs for performance improvements, standardization, cost reductions, capacity expansion, and development of demand-side market pull.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Introduction
    E.1.1 Major Changes from Our 2012 Forecast
    E.1.2 Three Scenarios for OLED Lighting
    E.2 Ensuring Scenario 1 and Getting Into General Illumination Markets
    E.3 Players to Watch
    E.3.1 LG to the Rescue
    E.3.1 Is China Next in Line?
    E.3.2 Other Firms to Watch
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Lighting Markets
    E.4.1 Comparison of Scenario 1 and Scenario 2 Forecasts
    E.4.2 Details of the Scenario 1 Forecast
    E.4.3 Details of the Scenario 2 Forecast
     
    Chapter One:  Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report:  Is this the End of OLED Lighting?
    1.1.1 Will Anyone Invest in New Capacity?
    1.1.2 Scenario 1:  OLED Lighting Prevails
    1.1.3 Scenario 2:  OLED Lighting as a Niche
    1.1.4 Scenario 3: The Death of OLEDs
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology and Information Sources
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Commercialization of OLED Lighting – Challenges and Addressable Markets
    2.1 The Evolution of OLED Lighting Performance Specifications
    2.1.1 The Days of Rapid Development May Be Over
    2.1.2 Efficiency, Lifetimes, and Luminance
    2.1.3 Increasing Panel Size
    2.2 Other Challenges to Commercialization of OLED Lighting
    2.2.1 Cost Issues
    2.2.2 Standardization of Panels and Fixtures
    2.2.3 Developing New Markets for OLED Lighting and the Importance of Design
    2.3 Addressable Markets for OLEDs
    2.3.1 Designer and Sample Kits
    2.3.2 Luxury Luminaires and Designer Showpieces—Limited Markets
    2.3.3 Getting into General Illumination Markets
    2.3.4 Automotive Applications for OLED Lighting
    2.4 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Analysis of the OLED Lighting Supply Chain
    3.1 Introduction
    3.1.1 The Need for a Market Champion
    3.1.2 Manufacturing Capacity in OLED Lighting
    3.2 The Importance of the European Market for Growth in OLED Lighting
    3.3 The Rise of the OLED Lighting Supply Chain in Asia
    3.3.1 LG Will Take the Lead
    3.3.2 OLED Lighting Capacity in China
    3.3.3 The Future of Japanese OLED Lighting Powerhouses
    3.4 Thoughts on the American Market
    3.5 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts for OLED Lighting
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology and Assumptions
    4.1.1 What Happened?  Why 2012 was So Boring for the OLED Lighting Sector
    4.1.2 The Investment Picture:  OLED Lighting Not as Bright as It Once Was
    4.1.3 NanoMarkets’ OLED Lighting Forecast:  A New Approach
    4.1.4 General Methodology Remains the Same
    4.1.5 Scope of the Forecast
    4.1.6 Data Sources
    4.1.7 Assumptions About Panel Sizes in Scenarios 1 and 2
    4.1.8 Assumptions About Costs and Prices in Scenarios 1 and 2
    4.1.9 General Economic Assumptions
    4.2 Forecasts for OLED Lighting by Application
    4.2.1 Samples and Designer Kits
    4.2.2 Luxury Lighting Luminaires
    4.2.3 Large-Scale OLED Lighting Installations
    4.2.4 Residential Lighting Applications
    4.2.5 Office Lighting and Other Commercial or Industrial Lighting
    4.2.6 Automotive and Other Transportation Lighting Using OLEDs
    4.2.7 Other, Specialty Applications for OLED Lighting
    4.3 Summaries of Market Forecasts in this Chapter
    4.3.1 Summary of Scenario 1 Forecasts for OLED Lighting
    4.3.2 Summary of Scenario 2 Forecasts for OLED Lighting
    4.3.3 A Comparison of NanoMarkets’ Scenario 1 and 2 Forecasts for OLED Lighting

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author
     
    List of Exhibits


    Exhibit E-1: Factors That Will Influence the Ability of OLED Lighting to Achieve a “High-Growth” Scenario 1
    Exhibit E-2:  Prospects for Other Major Firms in the OLED Space
    Exhibit E-3: Comparison of the Three Scenarios for the OLED Lighting Market 2013-2020
    Exhibit E-4: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Panels in a High-Growth Scenario 1, in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit E-5: Summary of Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Panels in a Low-Growth Scenario 2, in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 2-1: Overview of OLED Lighting “State-of-the-Art” Technical Characteristics
    Exhibit 2-2: Overview of OLED Lighting “State-of-the-Art” Technical Characteristics
    Exhibit 2-3: Significant Cost Barriers in Manufacturing of OLED Lighting
    Exhibit 2-4: Progress on Establishing Standards in OLED Lighting
    Exhibit 3-1: Likely Contenders for OLED Lighting Industry Champion
    Exhibit 3-2: Eight-Year Forecast of Estimated Global OLED Lighting Capacity in a High-Growth Scenario 1 in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 3-3: Eight-Year Forecast of Estimated Global OLED Lighting Capacity in a Low-Growth Scenario 2 in Which Cost & Performance Targets are NOT Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 3-5: Key OLED Lighting Panel and Luminaire Firms in Japan
    Exhibit 3-6: Selected OLED Lighting Panel and Luminaire Firms in North America
    Exhibit 4-1: Average OLED Lighting Panel Sizes 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-2: Average OLED Lighting Costs, Markup, and Prices in the High-Growth Scenario (1), in which Targeted Cost Reductions Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-3: Average OLED Lighting Costs, Markup, and Prices in the Low-Growth Scenario (2) in which Targeted Cost Reductions are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-4: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting Panels in Designer Kits and Individual Samples in a High-Growth Scenario (1) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved  2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-5: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting Panels in Designer Kits and Individual Samples in a Low Growth Scenario (2) In Which Cost & Performance Targets are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-6: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Luxury Luminaires in a High-Growth Scenario (1) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-7: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Luxury Luminaires in a Low-Growth (2) Scenario in Which Cost & Performance Targets are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-8: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Large-Scale Installations, Demonstration/Show Room Projects, Prestige Signage, Trade Show Exhibits, & Related in a High-Growth Scenario (1) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-9: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Large-Scale Installations, Demonstration/Show Room Projects, Prestige Signage, Trade Show Exhibits, & Related in a Low-Growth Scenario (2) in Which Cost & Performance Targets are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-10: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Residential Applications in a High-Growth Scenario(1) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-11: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Residential Applications in a Low-Growth Scenario (2) in Which Cost & Performance Targets are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-12: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Office, Commercial, & Industrial Lighting Applications in a High-Growth Scenario (1) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-13: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Office, Commercial, & Industrial Lighting Applications in a Low-Growth Scenario (2) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-14: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Automotive Applications in a High-Growth Scenario (1) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-15: Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting in Automotive Applications in a Low-Growth Scenario (2) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-16: Other Potential Applications for OLED Lighting
    Exhibit 4-17: Summary of Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Panels in a High-Growth Scenario (1) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-18: Summary of Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting (Kits, Fixtures, Installations) in a High-Growth Scenario (1) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-19: Summary of Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Panels in a Low-Growth Scenario (2) in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-20: Summary of Eight-Year Forecast of OLED Lighting (Kits, Fixtures, Installations) in a Low-Growth Scenario(2)  in Which Cost & Performance Targets Are Not Achieved 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-21: Comparison of the High-Growth  (Scenario 1) & Low-Growth (Scenario 2) Forecasts for the OLED Lighting Market 2013-2020

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-619 PUBLISHED February 21, 2013
The Market for Sensors in the Internet-of-Things Market:  2013-to-2020
CATEGORIES :
  • Emerging Electronics
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is essentially all about sensors without which it cannot achieve its promised functionality.  For this reason, NanoMarkets believes that IoT’s arrival will mean a surge in demand for sensors of many kinds.  Indeed, IoT could mean a remaking of the sensor industry, generating hundreds of new opportunities for Internet-connected sensors.  While the sensor sector has seen some fascinating new technologies emerge in the past decade, this is the first time we are seeing a mass market emerge for novel sensor types.

    With all this in mind, NanoMarkets is publishing this report to identify and quantify where the markets for IoT sensors will be found over the next eight years.  Coverage is of six types of sensor:  light, heat, touch/pressure, motion, acoustic and gas/chemical.  And the report focuses on six applications areas that NanoMarkets believes are key to the rapid growth in revenues that are expected in the IoT sensor business.  These applications are: home automation, commercial building automation, media and gaming, healthcare, the “Industrial Internet, and transportation.

    This report contains granular eight-year forecasts of all of these applications with breakouts of the kinds of sensors and hubs used in each and in both volume and value terms.  There is also a revenue forecast by geography.  In addition, the reader of this report will learn (1) how the IoT will restructure the sensor industry and (2) where the new opportunities will emerge as legacy sensor systems are connected to the Internet and new protocols and requirements for connectivity and security appear.  Where appropriate, this report discusses the strategies and products of firms that are already hooked into the opportunities that IoT sensors present.

    NanoMarkets believes that this report will be essential reading for marketing and business development executives in the sensor,  smart materials, data communications and automation sectors, as well as investors seeking profitable new directions in the Internet-of-Things.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 The Sensor Industry Will Be Renewed by the IoT
    E.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of IoT Sensors
    E.3  Sensor Technology Developments and Opportunities
    E.4 Home Automation Opportunities
    E.5 Commercial Building Automation
    E.6 Media and Gaming
    E.7 Healthcare
    E.8 The "Industrial Internet"
    E.9 Transportation and Logistics

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Overview to Report
    1.1.1 Software:  The Key to the IoT Sensor Business
    1.1.2 Sensor Firms:  What is to be Done?
    1.1.3 Service Firms:  Telcos and the Others
    1.1.4 Into the Future
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of Report

    Chapter Two: How the Internet-of-Things Will Reshape the Sensor Industry
    2.1 Early Successes and Constraints
    2.2 Next Steps:  Gateways, Standards and Sensors
    2.2.1 Go to Market Strategy:  What Gateways Need Today
    2.2.2 Further Development of Gateways May Mean Their Disappearance
    2.2.3 Impact on Protocols and Addressability
    2.3 Bringing Legacy Sensors Online
    2.4 Infrastructure Issues:  Providing and Monetizing the Communications Infrastructure for IoT Sensors
    2.5 Sensors, Security and Market Opportunities
    2.5.1 Sensor Design and Security
    2.5.2 Mobile Sensor Security Deployment
    2.5.3 Gateway Security
    2.6 Device Identity and Discovery
    2.7 Data Lessons for the IoT Sensor Industry from Mobile Data
    2.8 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Eight-Year Forecasts and Market Sector Analysis for the IoT Sensors
    3.1 Drivers for the IoT Sensors Markets
    3.1.1 Middleware Makes Things Easier for IoT Sensors
    3.1.2 Growing Role of Big Data as a Driver for IoT Sensors
    3.2 Forecasting Methodology
    3.2.1 Data Sources
    3.2.2 Scope of Forecasts
    3.2.3 Economic and Geographic Assumptions
    3.2.4 Alternative Scenarios
    3.3 The Internet-of-Things and Home Automation Sensors
    3.3.1 Current and Future Needs for IoT Sensors in Home Automation
    3.3.2 Energy Needs in the Ascendant in IoT-Based Home Automation
    3.3.3 Smart Grid Sensor Opportunities in the Home Area Network (HAN)
    3.3.4 Forecasts of IoT Sensor Markets for Home Automation
    3.4 The Internet-of-Things and Commercial Building Sensors
    3.4.1 Current and Future Needs for IoT Sensors in Commercial Building Automation
    3.4.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of IoT Sensors for Commercial Buildings
    3.5 Some Notes on Sensors Used in Building Automation
    3.5.1 Low-Cost Sensors in Building Automation
    3.6 The Internet-of-Things for Media and Gaming
    3.6.1 Key Players in Sensor-based Gaming
    3.6.2 Special Factors Impacting the Gaming Business
    3.6.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of IoT Sensors for Media and Gaming
    3.7 Internet-of-Things and Healthcare Sensors
    3.7.1 Healthcare Megatrends and IoT Sensors
    3.7.2 Applications and Opportunities for IoT Sensors in Healthcare
    3.7.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of IoT Sensors for Healthcare
    3.8 The Internet-of-Things and Sensors for the Industrial Internet
    3.8.1 Oil and Gas and IoT Sensors
    3.8.2 Smart Grid and IoT sensors
    3.8.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Sensors of IoT Sensors for the Industrial Internet
    3.9 Internet-of-Things and Sensors for Transportation/Logistics
    3.9.1 Tracking Systems
    3.9.2 Public Transportation and Fleet Management
    3.9.3 Public Parking and IoT Sensors
    3.9.4 Aviation Applications
    3.9.5 Shipping Applications
    3.9.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of IoT Sensors Transportation
    3.10 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Four: Summary of Forecasts of Sensors for the Internet-of-Things
    4.1 Eight-Year Forecast of Revenues from IoT Sensors and Hubs by Application
    4.2 Eight-Year Forecast of Revenues from IoT Sensors and Hubs by Technology
    4.3 Eight-Year Forecast of Revenues from IoT sensors and Hubs by Geographical Region
    4.3.1 Snapshots of Important Emerging Markets for IoT Sensors:  Brazil
    4.3.2 Snapshots of Important Emerging Markets for IoT Sensors:  China

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Internet-of-Things Sensor Markets, 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit E-2: Summary of Market Environments and Opportunities for IoT Sensors
    Exhibit 3-1: Eight-Year Forecast of Market for IoT Sensors and Sensor Hubs in Home Automation
    Exhibit 3-2: Eight-Year Forecast of Market for IoT Sensors and Sensor Hubs in Commercial Building Automation
    Exhibit 3-3: Eight-Year Forecast of Market for IoT Sensors and Sensor Hubs in Media/Gaming Automation
    Exhibit 3-4: Eight-Year Forecast of Market for IoT Sensors and Sensor Hubs in Healthcare Automation
    Exhibit 3-5: Eight-Year Forecast of Market for IoT Sensors and Sensor Hubs in Industrial Internet
    Exhibit 3-6: Eight-Year Forecast of Market for IoT Sensors and Sensor Hubs in Transportation/Logistics
    Exhibit 4-1: Eight-Year Forecast of Revenues from IoT Sensors by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-2: Eight-Year Forecast of Revenues from IoT Sensors by Technology ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 4-3: Eight-Year Forecast of Total Revenues by Geographic Region

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-617 PUBLISHED February 04, 2013
Smart Mirrors Markets – 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY
    The objective of this report identifies and quantifies the opportunities, challenges, and prospects for growth of smart mirrors. Specifically, it analyzes the capabilities of current and likely future smart mirror technologies and how these technologies may be deployed in both automotive and non-automotive applications.
     
    Smart technologies covered in the report include the following:
    • Self-dimming technology, which is further broken out into electrochromic and “other” self-dimming technologies in the automotive sector. Note that the “other” category includes such technologies as photochromic systems, thermochromic systems, and suspended particle devices. Also note that, because of the early stage of the market and because of the minimal penetration of self-dimming into non-automotive applications for smart mirrors, this category is not further broken out in the household/consumer, healthcare/medical, or advertising/marketing forecasts.
    • Self-cleaning technologies.
    • Self-repairing technologies.
    • Embedded electronics, which is further broken out (in the automotive sector forecasts only) into sensors, displays, cameras, and touch technology. Note that, because of the early stage of the market for non-automotive smart mirror applications, this category is not further broken out in the household/consumer, healthcare/medical, or advertising/marketing forecasts.
    In addition, the analysis is carried out based on the four marketing factors shown above and in the following four markets:
    • Automotive applications for smart mirrors;
    • Household and/or consumer applications for smart mirrors;
    • Healthcare and medical-related applications for smart mirrors, both in professional settings and in home healthcare settings; and
    • Retail and advertising applications for smart mirrors.
    As usual, we provide eight-year forecasts for the various smart technologies for smart mirrors in these sectors, and the projections are developed in both volume and value terms.
     
    In these forecasts, and in the report in general, we are principally concerned with the smart mirrors themselves and the relevant smart technologies (coatings, electronic systems, etc.) associated with them. Packaging and integration costs are not a focus of this report. In addition, all of the forecasts were developed in the context of important and relevant developments in the various sectors covered.
     
    Although the primary goal of this report is to forecast the market for smart mirrors, we also examine how the new developments will influence the established players in smart mirror business, and how these firms are strategizing for these new opportunities. In addition, we review selected smaller firms that may become key players in the emerging multifunctional smart mirror field.
     
    This report is international in scope.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary:Opportunities for Smart Mirrors
    E.1 The Future of Automotive Mirrors
    E.2 Opportunities for an Emerging Smart Mirror Industry: Digital Mirrors
    E.3 Firms to Watch in the Smart Mirror Space
    E.4 Forecasting Methodology and Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts
    E.4.1 Objective and Scope of the Report
    E.4.2 Forecasting Methodology
    E.4.3 Data Sources Used
    E.4.4 Alternative Scenarios
    E.4.5 Forecast Summary

    Chapter One: Technologies for Smart Mirrors
    1.1 Smart Materials for Smart Mirrors
    1.1.1 Current and Future Use of Electrochromic Technology for Smart Mirrors
    1.1.2 Other Self-Dimming Technology for Smart Mirrors
    1.1.3 Self-Cleaning Mirrors
    1.1.4 Self-Repairing Mirrors
    1.2 Embedded Electronic Devices in Smart Mirrors
    1.2.1 Sensors
    1.2.2 Displays
    1.2.3 Cameras
    1.2.4 Touch Sensors in Smart Mirrors
    1.3 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Two: Automotive Markets and Market Forecasts for Smart Mirrors
    2.1 The Evolution of Smart Auto Mirrors
    2.1.1 Improving Safety with Smart Auto Mirrors
    2.1.2 Improving Comfort with Smart Auto Mirrors
    2.1.3 Enhancing Automobile Design and Style with Smart Mirrors
    2.2 Future Products and Likely Acceptance
    2.3 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Mirrors in Automotive Applications

    Chapter Three: Smart Mirrors in Consumer and Household Applications
    3.1 Mirrors as Information Devices
    3.1.1 Bathroom and Bedroom Applications for Smart Mirrors
    3.1.2 Other Consumer Applications for Smart Mirrors
    3.2 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Mirrors in Consumer and Household Applications
    3.2.1 Analysis of the Addressable Market for Smart Mirrors in Consumer and Household Applications
    3.2.2 Forecasts for Smart Mirror Technologies in Consumer and Household Applications

    Chapter Four: Healthcare and Medical Applications for Smart Mirrors
    4.1 Products and Applications for Smart Mirrors in Healthcare and Medical-Related Markets
    4.1.1 Professional Products
    4.1.2 Personal Healthcare Products
    4.2 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Mirrors in Medical/Healthcare Applications
    4.2.1 Analysis of the Addressable Market for Smart Mirror Technologies in Medical/Healthcare Applications
    4.2.2 Forecasts for Smart Mirror Technologies in Medical/Healthcare Applications

    Chapter Five: Retail and Advertising Applications for Smart Mirrors
    5.1 Smart Mirrors for in Retail and Advertising
    5.1.1 Clothing Stores as a Target Market for Smart Mirrors
    5.1.2 Smart Mirrors for Advertising in Businesses and Public Spaces
    5.2 Eight-Year Market Forecast of Smart Mirrors in Retail and Advertising Applications
    5.2.1 Analysis of the Addressable Market for Smart Mirrors in Retail and Advertising Applications
    5.2.2 Forecasts for Smart Mirror Technologies in Retail and Advertising Settings

    Acronyms and Abbreviations
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Drivers for Growth of Smart Mirrors
    Exhibit E-2: Summary of the Smart Mirror Technologies Market 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 1-1: Selected R &D Trends and Institutions in Self-Cleaning Glass
    Exhibit 1-2: Selected Suppliers of Self-Cleaning Coatings
    Exhibit 2-1: Comparison of Smart Mirrors from Gentex and Magna Mirrors
    Exhibit 2-2: Analysis of the Market for Smart Mirror Technologies in Automotive Applications
    Exhibit 2-3:  Automotive Interior Rear-View Smart Mirrors by Technology 2013-2020
    Exhibit 2-4: Automotive Exterior/Wing Smart Mirrors by Technology 2013-2020
    Exhibit 2-5: Summary of the Market Value of Automotive Smart Mirror Technologies 2013-2020
    Exhibit 3-1: Selected Examples of Smart Mirrors Concepts for the Home
    Exhibit 3-2: Analysis of the Addressable Market for Smart Mirror Technologies in Consumer Goods 2013-2020
    Exhibit 3-3: Smart Mirror Technologies in Consumer Goods 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-1: Selected Smart Mirror Concepts Targeted for Healthcare and Medical Applications
    Exhibit 4-2: Selected Smart Mirror Concepts Targeted for Home Healthcare Applications
    Exhibit 4-3: Analysis of the Addressable Market for Smart Mirror Technologies in Healthcare and Medical Applications 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-4: Smart Mirror Technologies in Healthcare and Medical Applications 2013-2020
    Exhibit 5-1: Analysis of the Addressable Market for Smart Mirror Technologies in Retail and Advertising 2013-2020
    Exhibit 5-2: Smart Mirror Technologies in Retail and Advertising Applications 2013-2020

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $3,295.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $3,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $4,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-615 PUBLISHED January 07, 2013
The Silver Inks and Pastes Market – 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    This latest report from NanoMarkets quantifies the market opportunities for silver inks and pastes in electronics applications over the next eight years.  In the report, we consider how the industry’s latest commercial strategies and technical developments, as well as the persistent environment of high silver prices, which has been in effect for over 18 months now, have affected the market for printed silver in electronics. We identify the applications in which printed silver will generate revenue for the industry in the near- and mid-term, and we examine the key players in the silver inks/pastes markets. The report provides granular, eight-year volume and revenue forecasts for this business by application and by material.

    Printed silver, with its superior conductivity, stability, and ease-of-use in printing applications, has long held a critical place in electronics applications, and suppliers of printable silver materials have enjoyed a fortunate history of new applications – home electronics, computers and displays, photovoltaics, etc. – for their materials. In the report, we consider the following, shifting, opportunities for silver inks and pastes:

    • We examine the traditional electronics applications for printed silver – circuit boards, membrane switches, resistive heaters, keyboards, etc. – and look for opportunities for thick-film silver pastes to continue to make money.

    • We review the changes in the photovoltaics industry and discuss how changes in the business environment are damaging the growth of printed silver in this sector.

    • We look for rising applications – in OLEDs, in other new kinds of displays, and in sensors for pervasive electronics – that may be able to make up for losses elsewhere.

    • Finally, we consider whether the nanosilver revolution will ever happen, or if it is time to give up on nanosilver-based electronics.

    Applications for printed silver covered by this report include:  thick-film electronics (printed circuit boards, membrane switches, keyboards, resistive heaters, discrete electronic components, and other printed circuitry applications), displays (plasma and other displays), OLEDs (both lighting and displays), PV, sensors, and RFIDs.

    NanoMarkets has been covering this sector now for more than six years, and this is latest in our ongoing series of industry analysis on silver materials used in various applications.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary: Silver Inks and Paste
    E.1 Major Changes Since NanoMarkets' 2012 Report on Silver Inks and Pastes
    E.1.1 Persistently High Silver Prices:  The New Reality for Silver Inks and Pastes?
    E.1.2 Other Major Changes
    E.2  Where is the Money in Silver Inks and Pastes?
    E.2.1 Finding Opportunities in Old Applications
    E.2.2 Are There New Applications Markets to Be Had for Silver Inks and Pastes?
    E.2.3 Is Nanosilver Over?
    E.3 Key Firms to Watch in the Silver Inks and Pastes Industry
    E.3.1 Companies to Watch
    E.3.2 The Importance of China
    E.4 Summary of the Eight-Year Forecasts for Silver Inks and Pastes
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background
    1.1.1 The Silver Price Problem
    1.1.2 Notable Recent Developments
    1.1.3 Continuing Prospects for Silver in Established and New Markets
    1.1.4 Will the Nanosilver Revolution Ever Happen?
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Silver Inks and Pastes: Technology, Products and Key Suppliers
    2.1 Are High Silver Prices Here to Stay?
    2.2 The Future of Silver-Based Electronic Inks and Pastes
    2.2.1 Screen-Printing Pastes for Thick-Film Applications
    2.2.2 High-Fire vs. Low-Fire Pastes
    2.2.3 Silver Inks
    2.2.4 Will There Ever Be a Role for Nanosilver?
    2.3 The Future of Competitive Materials
    2.3.1 Carbon Inks/Pastes and Carbon-Silver Mixtures
    2.3.2 Copper as Competition for Silver
    2.3.3 Other Metals?
    2.3.4 Carbon Nanomaterials, Conductive Polymers, and Other Emerging Threats to Printed Silver
    2.4 Key Suppliers of Silver Inks and Pastes
    2.4.1 Recent Developments in the Supply Chain
    2.4.2 Overview of Notable Suppliers
    2.4.3 Likely Future Competition from China
    2.5 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Applications for Silver Inks and Pastes
    3.1 Thick Film Electronics and Printed Silver
    3.1.1 Printed Circuit Boards
    3.1.2 Membrane Switches
    3.1.3 Keyboards
    3.1.4 Resistive Heaters
    3.1.5 Surface-Mounted Components
    3.2 Photovoltaic Panels
    3.2.1 The New Economic Reality in the PV Industry
    3.2.2 Impact of the Declining Usage of Silver in PV on the Silver Inks and Pastes Industry
    3.3 Printed Silver in Displays and Lighting
    3.3.1 Plasma Displays: What Will the Decline of Plasma Mean for the Silver Inks and Pastes Market?
    3.3.2 LCDs and Silver
    3.3.3 E-Paper Displays and Silver
    3.3.4 Silver and Touch Displays
    3.3.5 Silver and the Rise of OLEDs
    3.4 Other Likely Applications for Printed Silver
    3.4.1 Sensors
    3.4.2 RFIDs
    3.4.3 Role for Printed Silver in Ubiquitous Electronics
    3.5 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts for Silver Inks and Pastes
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology
    4.1.1 General Methodology
    4.1.2 Scope of the Forecast
    4.1.3 Data Sources
    4.1.4 Pricing Assumptions
    4.1.5 Other Assumptions and Changes from Previous NanoMarkets' Reports
    4.1.6 Alternative Scenarios
    4.2 Forecasts for Silver Inks and Pastes by Application
    4.2.1 Thick-Film Electronics
    4.2.2 PV Applications
    4.2.3 Displays –PDPs, Touch, LCDs, e-Paper, and OLEDs
    4.2.4 OLED Lighting
    4.2.5 RFIDs
    4.2.6 Sensors
    4.3 Eight-Year Forecasts for Silver Inks and Pastes by Material
    4.3.1 Screen-Printing Pastes by Application
    4.3.2 Nanosilver Inkjet Inks by Application
    4.3.3 Flexographic, Gravure, and Other Inks by Application
    4.4 Summaries of the Silver Inks and Pastes Forecasts
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in This Report
    About the Author
     

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: GRAND TOTAL Summary of Value of Silver Printing Inks and Pastes 2013-2020  ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 2-1: Typical Applications for High-Firing and Low-Temperature Curing Silver Pastes    
    Exhibit 2-2: Overview of Product Portfolios  and Notable Developments of Selected Silver Ink and Paste Suppliers    
    Exhibit 2-2: Overview of Product Portfolios  and Notable Developments of Selected Silver Ink and Paste Suppliers    
    Exhibit 2-2: Overview of Product Portfolios  and Notable Developments of Selected Silver Ink and Paste Suppliers    
    Exhibit 3-1: Opportunities for Printed Silver in TFPV Applications    
    Exhibit 3-2: Targeted Sensor Applications for Printed Silver Circuitry    
    Exhibit 3-3: Overview of Selected Low-Cost and/or Printed Electronics Applications that Will Contribute to the Ubiquitous Electronics Revolution    
    Exhibit 4-1: Pricing of Silver and Silver Inks/Pastes 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-2: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes for Traditional Thick-Film Applications 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-3: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes for Traditional Thick-Film Applications by Printing Method 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-4: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Traditional Thick-Film Applications by Ink Type 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-5: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Crystalline Silicon (c-Si) and Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin Layer (HIT) PV 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-6: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Inorganic and Organic TFPV (all types) 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-7: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Inorganic and Organic TFPV (all types) by PV Technology 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-8: Summary of Silver Inks & Pastes in PV Applications 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-9: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in PV Applications by Printing Method 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-10: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in PV Applications by Ink Type 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-11: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Plasma Display Panels (PDPs) 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-12: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) Displays 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-13: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in LCDs and e-Paper Displays 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-14: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes for Touch Display Panels 2013-2020    100
    Exhibit 4-15: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Displays by Application 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-16: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Displays by Printing Method 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-17: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Displays by Ink Type 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-18: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in OLED Lighting Applications 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-19: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in OLED Lighting by Ink Type 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-20: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in RFIDs by Application (Antennas vs. Chips) 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-21: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in RFIDs by Printing Method 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-22: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in RFIDs by Ink Type 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-23: Eight Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes for Sensor Applications 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-24: Eight-Year Forecasts of Silver Inks and Pastes in Sensors by Ink Type 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-25: Eight-Year Forecasts of Conventional Silver and Nanosilver Screen Printing Pastes by Application 2013-2020    
    Exhibit 4-26: Eight-Year Forecasts of Nanosilver Inkjet Printing Inks by Application    
    Exhibit 4-27: Eight-Year Forecasts of Conventional Silver and Nanosilver Flexographic, Gravure, and Other Printing Inks by Application    
    Exhibit 4-27: Eight-Year Forecasts of Conventional Silver and Nanosilver Flexographic, Gravure, and Other Printing Inks by Application    
    Exhibit 4-28: GRAND TOTAL Summary of the Quantity of Silver Consumed in Printing Inks and Pastes 2013-2020 (Millions Troy Ounces)    
    Exhibit 4-29: GRAND TOTAL Summary of the Value of Silver Printing Inks and Pastes 2013-2020  ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $2,495.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $3,495.00  
REPORT # Nano-601 PUBLISHED December 27, 2012
Solar Storage 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY
    This report provides a detailed analysis and forecast of the markets for energy storage for the solar industry with coverage of both the photovoltaics (PV) and concentrated solar power (CSP) sectors.  Opportunities are identified for the full range of storage options including batteries, supercapacitors and mechanical systems.

    A lot has happened since NanoMarkets last examined this market.  Perhaps most dramatically, small PV installations, which just a year ago would never have considered installing any kind of storage facility are now being pushed into buying batteries because of declining feed-in tariffs (FiTs) and other subsidy reductions.  At the same time, utility-scale solar – both PV and CSP – are also adopting strategies for large-scale storage solutions and in some cases such storage is even being mandated by government.  Meanwhile, Smart Grid deployment is continuing to drive solar energy storage markets as grids find that they need storage a way of protecting the grid from the variability implicit in all solar generation technologies.

    This report also contains discussions of how the leading firms in the energy storage space are adapting their products and product strategies for solar markets.  In addition, many examples are also given of solar installations that are using storage in ways that suggest new directions for revenue generation in this sector.

    Finally, this report assesses all the currently available storage technologies for the storage of solar generated power and determines how they can fit into solar industry landscape, both now and in the future.  The report also quantifies all the major markets for solar-related energy storage in an eight-year market forecast in both volume and value terms.  This market forecast is broken out both by technology and the region into which the solar storage products are expected to be sold.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Opportunities for Lead-Acid Batteries in Solar Energy Storage:  Poor Margins, Low Prices but New Hope from the Residential Sector
    E.2 The Transition to Lead-Carbon Batteries:  An Upcoming Opportunity for Solar Storage
    E.3 Supercaps, Storage and Solar
    E.3.1 Thoughts on Ultrabatteries
    E.4 Lithium Batteries:  The Way of the Future or Not?
    E.4.1 Solar-Related Lithium Battery Projects in Germany
    E.4.2 Solar-Related Lithium Battery Projects in Spain
    E.4.3 Solar-Related Lithium Battery Opportunities in the U.S.
    E.4.4 Solar-Related Lithium Battery Opportunities in China
    E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Solar-Related Energy Storage
    E.5.1 A Note on Utility-Scale Solar and Storage
    E.6 Opportunities for Solar-Power Storage by World Region
    E.6.1 Solar Storage in the U.S.
    E.6.2 Solar Storage in Europe
    E.6.3 Asia and Solar Storage

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Why the Changing Economics of PV Will Lead to a Storage Boom
    1.1.2 Slouching Towards Storage at the Solar Utilities
    1.1.3 Some Thoughts on Technology Change in the Solar Storage Space
    1.1.4 An Economic Postscript
    1.2   Goal and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    1.3.2 Coverage of Forecasts
    1.3.3 Data Sources
    1.3.4 Alternative Scenarios
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Technologies and Products for Solar-Related Energy Storage
    2.1 Technology for Storage Options Expanding in Number and in Capacity, Too
    2.1.1 Pricing Trends for Solar Energy Storage Technologies
    2.2 Lead-Acid and Lead-Carbon Batteries
    2.2.1 Types of Lead-Acid Battery
    2.2.2 The Transition to Lead-Carbon Batteries
    2.3 Metal Hydride Batteries
    2.4 Sodium Sulfur Batteries for the Solar Market
    2.4.1 Recent Technical Developments in NaS Batteries
    2.5 Sodium Metal Halide Batteries
    2.6 Flow Battery Systems and Solar
    2.6.1 Vanadium Flow Batteries
    2.6.2 Zinc Bromine and Other Hybrid Flow Batteries
    2.6.3 Supply Structure for Flow Batteries and Supplier Interest in Solar Applications
    2.7 Lithium-Ion Batteries for Solar Storage
    2.7.1 Advantages and Disadvantages of Lithium-Ion Batteries in the Solar Market
    2.7.2 Solar-Related Technology Evolution for the Lithium-Ion Battery
    2.8 Liquid Metal Batteries
    2.9 Supercapacitors and Solar
    2.9.1 Actual and Potential Applications for Supercapacitors in the Solar Sector
    2.9.2 Supercapacitor Supply Structure and Supplier Interest in Solar Applications
    2.10 Ultrabatteries in Solar
    2.11 Solar and Mechanical Storage
    2.11.1 Pumped Hydro-Electric Storage
    2.11.2 Compressed Air Energy Storage
    2.12 Flywheels
    2.13 Related and Competitive Technologies and Solutions
    2.13.1 Smart Grids and Solar Storage
    2.13.2 FACTS
    2.13.3 Renewable Integration Management Systems (RIMS)
    2.14 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three:  Markets and Market Forecasts for Solar-Related Energy Storage
    3.1 The Current Need for Storage by Solar Systems
    3.1.1 Impact of Solar Non-Coincidence on the Storage Market
    3.1.2 Non-Dispatchability: Future Opportunities for Dispatchable Solar
    3.1.3 Grid Stability and Reliability
    3.2 PV Storage in Buildings
    3.2.1 It's an Ill Wind: PV's Troubles May Boost the Market for Storage
    3.2.2 Regulatory Trends Seem to Favor PV Storage
    3.2.3 What a Difference a Year Makes:  New Batteries for Small PV Installations
    3.3 Storage for Grid-Scale Solar
    3.3.1 Thermal Solar/CSP and Thermal Storage
    3.3.2 Storage Requirements for PV Utilities
    3.4 Solar Energy Storage in the Americas
    3.4.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of Solar-Related Energy Storage in the Americas
    3.4.2 California Energy Storage Requirements and Activities:  Regulation and Deployment
    3.4.3 Hawaii:  Maui Electric Company Storage Project
    3.4.4 Pennsylvania:  Philadelphia's Navy Yard Project
    3.4.5 New Mexico:  Prosperity Energy Storage Project
    3.4.6 Washington DC:  Navy Yard
    3.5 Europe and Solar Energy Storage
    3.5.1 Solar Storage Projects and Activity in Europe
    3.5.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Solar-Related Energy Storage in Europe
    3.6 Asia and Solar Energy Storage
    3.6.1 Market Analysis and Eight-Year Forecasts of Solar-Related Energy Storage in Japan
    3.6.2 Market Analysis and Eight Forecasts of Solar-Related Energy Storage in China
    3.6.3 Market Analysis and Eight-Year Forecasts of Solar-Related Energy Storage in India and Other Parts of the Asia
    3.7 Other Markets for Solar Energy Storage
    3.7.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of Solar-Related Energy Storage in the Middle East and Africa
    3.8 Summary of Forecasts of Solar-Related Storage
    3.9 Key Points from This Chapter
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits


    Exhibit E-1: Worldwide Markets for Solar-Energy Related  Storage by Technology 
    Exhibit 2-1: Cost Per Kilowatt Hour for Various Storage Technologies ($/kWh) 
    Exhibit 2-2: Benefits of Selected FACTS 
    Exhibit 3-1: Americas Market for Solar-Energy Related  Storage 
    Exhibit 3-2: European Market for Solar-Energy Related  Storage 
    Exhibit 3-3: Japanese Market for Solar-Energy Related  Storage 
    Exhibit 3-4: Non-Japan Asian Market for Solar-Energy Related  Storage 
    Exhibit 3-5: Middle East and Africa Market for Solar-Energy Related  Storage 
    Exhibit 3-6: Worldwide Markets for Solar-Energy Related  Storage by Technology 
    Exhibit 3-7: Worldwide Markets for Solar-Energy Related  Storage by Region 

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $2,495.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $3,495.00  
REPORT # Nano-595 PUBLISHED December 20, 2012
Bio-Plastics Markets
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    In this report NanoMarkets analyzes and quantifies the business opportunities available for Bio plastics in the polymer industry and along with it, discuss their applications. We also discuss the major players in the Bio plastic space and also identify the latest trends in Bio plastics. Apart from sharing the market share region wise, we have highlighted the market share based on the major types of Bio plastics. The focal point is on the following resin chemistries;

    • Polylactic acid (PLA)
    • Thermoplastic starch
    • Bio-polyamides
    • Poly hydroxyalkanoates (PHA)
    • Cellulose
    • Bio-polyethylene
    • Bio-polyethylene terephthalate (PET)

     

    For the past 2 years starch based Bio plastics and PLA based Bio plastics have witnessed increased growth. The demand for starch based and PLA based Bio plastics will rise by 2 times in the next 2 years, but with PHA having entered into commercial scale it has given route to its use in many Bio plastic applications because of its numerous unique properties. Many projects are going on which carter to the entry of Bio plastics into medical, electronics and automotive applications and NanoMarkets expects a slew of innovative products to be launched in Bio plastics in the coming years.

    This report provides the key decision makers with the current developments in the Bio plastics, the market potential and the growth for next 8 years. The data would be a driver for the fast growing Polymer Industry as we have provided insights into the use of renewable resources to create monomers that replace fossil-based monomers, such as feedstock’s made from sugarcane that are used to manufacture polyester and polyethylene. These resources could enable many fossil based product manufacturers to change their direction towards Bio plastics in the future and also have thrown light onto the issues (climate change, littering, unawareness of the benefits of the bio plastics, feedstock availability and municipality actions) which exist in the present Bio plastics markets.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary   
    E.1 Bio-Plastics: State of the Industry   
    E.2 Opportunities for Bio-plastics by Application   
    E.2.1 New Business Revenues for Bio-plastics from the Packaging Sector   
    E.2.2 Emerging Non-Packaging Opportunities for Bio-plastics   
    E.3 Opportunities for Bio-Plastics by Type of Material   
    E.3.1 Starch-based Bio-plastics   
    E.3.2 PLA   
    E.3.3 Bio-PE   
    E.3.4 Bio-PET   
    E.3.5 Bio-polyamide (PA)   
    E.3.6 Bio-PHA   
    E.3.7 Bio-based Succinic Acid   
    E.3.8  Next-Generation Bio-plastics and Feedstocks   
    E.4 Firms and Markets to Watch in the Bio-plastics Space   
    E.4.1 Asia Becoming the Center of Bio-Plastics Production   
    E.4.2 Russian Companies Moving into Bio-Plastics   
    E.4.3 Arkema (France)   
    E.4.4 Avantium (Netherlands)   
    E.4.5 BASF (Germany)   
    E.4.6 Braskem (Brazil)   
    E.4.7 Dow Chemical Company (U.S.)   
    E.4.8 Green Dot Holdings (U.S.)   
    E.3.7 Hisun Biomaterials (China)  
    E.4.9 Innovia Films (U.K.)   
    E.4.10 M&G Group (Italy)   
    E.4.11 Metabolix (U.S.)   
    E.3.11 NatureWorks (U.S.)   
    E.4.12 Novamont (Italy)   
    E.4.13 PTT Global Chemical Public Company, Ltd (Thailand)   
    E.4.14 Purac (Netherlands)   
    E.4.15 Showa Denko K.K (SDK) (Japan)   
    E.4.16 Teijin (Japan)   
    E.4.17 Uhde Inventa-Fischer (Germany)   
    E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Bio-Plastics Markets   

    Chapter One: Introduction to Bio-Plastics   
    1.1 Background to this Report   
    1.1.1 Emerging Markets to Power the Growth in Bio-Plastics   
    1.1.2 What is Driving Bio-Plastics Awareness and Growth?   
    1.1.3 Long-Term Challenges for the Bio-Plastics Industry   
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report   
    1.3 Methodology of this Report   
    1.4 Plan of this Report   

    Chapter Two: Bio-Plastic Materials and Technical Trends   
    2.1 A Coming Boom in Bio-Plastics?   
    2.2 Current Challenges in the Bio-Plastics Market   
    2.3 Starch-Based Bio-Plastics   
    2.3.1 Technical Trends, Commercialization, Applications for Starch-based Bio-Plastics   
    2.3.2 Major Suppliers of Starch-Based Bio-Plastics   
    2.4 Bio-Polyesters   
    2.4.1 Polylactic Acid and Polyhydroxy Alkanoates   
    2.4.2 Technical Trends, Commercialization and Applications for Cellulose-Based Bio-Plastics and Bio-Polyesters   
    2.4.3 Major Suppliers of Cellulose-Based Bio-Plastics and Bio-Polyesters   
    2.5 Bio-Polymers   
    2.5.1 Bio-Derived Polyethylene   
    2.5.2 Bio-Derived Polyamides   
    2.5.3 Other Biopolymers (Sugar-Based Biopolymers)   
    2.6 Novel Bio-Based Feedstocks for Bio-Plastics  
    2.6.1 Seaweed-Based Bio-Plastics   
    2.6.2 Polymers from CO2   
    2.7 Chinese Activity in the Bio-Plastics Market   
    2.7.1 Other Notable Chinese Companies Active in the Bio-Plastics Market   
    2.8 Key Points from this Chapter   

    Chapter Three: Market Assessment and Eight-Year Forecasts of the Bio-Plastics Market   
    3.1 Key Drivers for the Bio-Plastics Industry   
    3.1.1 Large Retailers   
    3.1.2 Public Awareness of the Need to Use Lower-Carbon Footprint Bio-Plastics   
    3.1.3 Advances in the Performance Properties of Bio-Plastics   
    3.1.4 Government Supported Incentives, Policies, and Directives   
    3.2 Forecasting Assumptions Used in this Report   
    3.2.1 Macroeconomic and Regulatory Assumptions   
    3.2.2 Sources of Information   
    3.2.3 Assumptions about Pricing and Units of Measurement   
    3.2.4 Alternative Scenarios   
    3.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of the Bio-Plastics Market   
    3.3.1 Food Industry Applications for Bio-plastics   
    3.3.2 Medical and Pharmaceutical Applications for Bio-plastics   
    3.3.3 Other Applications for Bio-plastics   
    3.3.4 Summary of NanoMarkets' Forecasts for Bio-Plastics by Application   
    3.3.5 Emerging and Future Applications for Bio-plastics   
    3.3.6 Forecast for Bio-Plastics by Type of Material   
    3.3.7 Forecast of the Bio-Plastics Market by Geographical Region   
    3.3.8 Summary Forecasts for Bio-Plastics   
    3.4 Key Points from this Chapter   

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report   
    About the Author   

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Global Forecast of the Bio-plastics Market   
    Exhibit 2-1: Existing & Emerging End-Use Applications   
    Exhibit 2-2: Characteristics of Mater-Bi Bio-Plastics   
    Exhibit 2-3: Cereplast Biopropylene vs. PP Homopolymer   
    Exhibit 2-4: Grades & Applications of NatrueWorks' Ingeo Bio-Polymer   
    Exhibit 2-5: NatureFlex NK Film Structure    
    Exhibit 2-6: Characteristics of Ecological Plastic (Bio-PET) from Toyota   
    Exhibit 3-1: Current Specifications and Testing Standards for Bio-Plastics   
    Exhibit 3-2: Organizations that Certify Bio-plastics   
    Exhibit 3-3: Worldwide Bio-plastics Demand in the Food Industry by Application   
    Exhibit 3-4: Worldwide Bio-plastics Demand in the Food Industry by Resin Type   
    Exhibit 3-5: Worldwide Bio-plastics Demand in the Medical & Pharmaceutical Industry by Application   
    Exhibit 3-6: Worldwide Bio-plastics Demand in the Medical & Pharmaceutical Industries by Selected Resin Type   
    Exhibit 3-7: Worldwide Demand for Bio-plastics in Other Applications (Metric Tons)   
    Exhibit 3-8: Worldwide Bio-plastics Demand in the Electronics Industry by Selected Resin Type   
    Exhibit 3-9: Worldwide Demand for Bio-plastics in the Tire & Automotive Industries by Selected Resin Type   
    Exhibit 3-10: Global Bio-plastics Demand by Application   
    Exhibit 3-11: Global Bio-plastics Demand by Application and Resin Type (Volume in Metric Tons)   
    Exhibit 3-12: Global Bio-plastics Demand by Type of Material   
    Exhibit  3-13: Global Bio-plastics Demand by Type of Resin (Volume in Metric Tons)   
    Exhibit 3-14: Global Bio-plastics Demand by Type of Resin ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 3-15: Forecast of Bio-plastics Production by Region (Metric Tons)   
    Exhibit 3-16: Forecasts of Bio-plastics Consumption by Region (Metric Tons)   
    Exhibit 3-17: Forecast of Bio-plastics  Consumption by Region ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 3-18: Forecast of Bio-plastics Consumption by Country (Metric Tons)   
    Exhibit 3-19: Forecast of Bio-plastics Consumption by Country ($ Millions)   
    Exhibit 3-20: Global Forecast of the Bio-plastics Market    
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $2,495.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $3,495.00  
REPORT # Nano-609 PUBLISHED December 20, 2012
Batteries and Supercapacitors for the Smart Grid -2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    Energy storage is a vital component of the Smart Grids that are currently being built around the world.   These grids are designed to improve the reliability of electricity transmission and distribution, facilitate the integration of renewable energy generators, and allow long-distance trading of electricity supplies.  All of these functions require the grid to offer buffers where electricity can be stored locally. 

    However, for the most part the technologies up to this task have not been available.  To the extent that grids have incorporated storage it has either been through the use of conventional batteries originally targeted towards the automotive industry and which are not optimal for grid storage or through major engineering projects such as compressed air storage which are impossible to replicate generally.

    As a result of all this, NanoMarkets believes there are exciting opportunities for manufacturers of batteries and supercapacitors that target emerging applications in the Smart Grid.  In 2009, NanoMarkets was one of the first industry analyst firms to identify and quantify these opportunities in a groundbreaking technology.  With almost four years of product development and grid deployment behind us, NanoMarkets is releasing this report, which is designed to show where money will be made in grid batteries and supercaps over the next eight years.

    While we believe that this report will become required reading for battery and supercapacitor firms, this report also spells out the potential for materials companies and specialty chemical firms who NanoMarkets believes will find considerable new business potential supplying advanced materials – especially nanomaterials -- for newer forms of grid storage.   In addition, NanoMarkets believes that this report will be of considerable use to utilities and other firms directly involved in the Smart Grid business, since it will show them how the next-generation of batteries and supercaps for Smart Grids will help to enable Smart Grid deployment.

    This new report from NanoMarkets reviews the latest applications for grid storage and shows where money can be made in the near-to-medium term future by supplying the batteries and supercapacitors that will meet the coming storage requirements of the grid. 

    This report provides granular eight-year forecasts of chemical batteries and supercapacitors in both volume shipments and market value, with breakouts by technology type, application, and regions supplied.  In addition, this report provides detailed assessments of the strategies being utilized by leading firms active in this space.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Introduction:  Smart Grid Storage and Materials Opportunities
    E.1.1 Overview of the Evolving Grid and the Role of Energy Storage
    E.1.2 Current Energy Storage Options
    E.2 Opportunities for Materials Producers
    E.3 Key Firms to Watch in the Smart Grid Energy Storage Landscape
    E.3.1 Lead Acid-Based Energy Storage Companies
    E.3.2 Lead Carbon-Based Energy Storage Companies
    E.3.3 High Temperature Battery Companies
    E.3.4 Flow Battery-Based Energy Storage Companies
    E.3.5 Supercapacitor-Based Energy Storage Companies
    E.4 Summary of NanoMarkets' Eight-Year Forecasts for Grid Storage

    Chapter One:  Introduction
    1.1 Background to This Report
    1.1.1 Current Grid Storage Landscape
    1.1.2 Near-Term Applications for Chemical Storage on the Smart Grid
    1.1.3 Future Advantages of Chemical Storage on the Smart Grid
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Materials and Technology for Battery and Supercapacitor Smart Grid Storage
    2.1 Introduction: Crucial Need for Advanced Grid Storage Solutions
    2.1.1 Overview of the Present Grid and the Future Grid Including Grid Storage
    2.1.2 The Need for Grid Storage Going Forward
    2.1.3 Smart Grid Storage Options: Batteries and Supercapacitors
    2.1.4 Materials Opportunities for Grid Storage
    2.2 Traditional Grid Storage Solutions
    2.2.1 Lead Acid and Advanced Lead Acid Batteries
    2.2.2 Metal Hydride Batteries
    2.2.3 Sodium Sulfur Batteries
    2.3 Advanced Battery Solutions
    2.3.1 Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Systems
    2.3.2 Zinc Bromine and Other Hybrid Flow Battery Systems
    2.3.3 Lithium-Ion Batteries
    2.3.4 Sodium Metal Halide Batteries
    2.3.5 Liquid Metal Batteries
    2.3.6 Ultrabatteries
    2.4 Chemical Storage Materials Roadmap
    2.5 Supercapacitors for Grid Storage Applications
    2.5.1 Current Supercapacitor Technologies and Applications
    2.5.2 Expanded Role for Supercapacitors in Grid Storage Applications
    2.5.3 Supercapacitor Materials Roadmap
    2.6 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three:  Company Profiles
    3.1 Advanced Lead Acid Companies
    3.1.1 Axion Power International
    3.1.2 C&D Technologies
    3.1.3 Ecoult
    3.1.4 Enersys
    3.1.5 Exide Technologies
    3.1.6 Firefly International Energy
    3.1.7 Ultralife Batteries
    3.2 Advanced Lithium-Ion Companies
    3.2.1 A123 systems
    3.2.2 Altair Nanotechnologies
    3.2.3 Boston Power
    3.2.4 Ener1 and Valence Technologies
    3.2.5 Hitachi Maxell
    3.2.6 Johnson Controls
    3.2.7 Kyushu Electric Power and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
    3.2.8 Nexeon
    3.2.9 Panasonic/Sanyo
    3.2.10 SAFT Groupe
    3.3 Sodium Sulfur Companies
    3.3.1 GeoBattery
    3.3.2 NGK Insulators Ltd/Tokyo Electric Power (TEPCO)
    3.4 Sodium Metal Halide Battery Companies
    3.4.1 Fiamm Sonik
    3.4.2 General Electric
    3.5 Zinc Bromide Storage Companies
    3.5.1 Premium Power Corp.
    3.5.2 ZBB Energy
    3.6 Vanadium Redox-Based Technology Companies
    3.6.1 Cellennium Limited (Thailand)
    3.6.2 Cellstrom GmbH
    3.6.3 Deeya Energy
    3.6.4 Prudent Energy (Formerly VRB Power Systems, Formerly Pinnacle VRB)
    3.6.5 RedT
    3.6.6 Sumitomo Electric Industries
    3.6.7 V-Fuel Pty Ltd
    3.7 Others Battery System Companies
    3.7.1 Ambri (Formerly Liquid Metal Battery Corporation)
    3.7.2 Aquion (Sodium Ion/Water Electrolyte)
    3.7.3 Cobasys (Metal Hydride)
    3.7.4 Revolt (Zinc Air)
    3.8 Chinese Battery Companies
    3.8.1 Advanced Battery Technologies
    3.8.2 China BAK
    3.8.3 China Ritar Power
    3.9 Supercapacitor Companies
    3.9.1 EnerG2
    3.9.2 Maxwell Technologies
    3.9.3 NEC/Tokin
    3.9.4 Nesscap
    3.9.5 Siemens
    3.10 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Four: Eight Year Forecasts
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology
    4.1.1 Data Sources
    4.1.2 Demand Drivers
    4.1.3 Clean Power Mandates that Create Grid Storage Opportunities
    4.1.4 Impact of China’s Grid Strategy on Grid Storage Demand
    4.1.5 Storage Roadmap for Grid Storage
    4.2 Eight-year Forecast of Materials Used in Smart Grid Storage Batteries and Supercapacitors
    4.2.1 Chemical Storage Technologies
    4.2.2 Supercapacitor Storage Technologies
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

     

    List of Exhibit

    Exhibit E-1:  Worldwide Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries 
    Exhibit E-2:  Worldwide Supercapacitor Market 
    Exhibit E-3: Total Grid Storage Market-Chemical Storage Batteries and Supercapacitors($ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-1: Cost per kilowatt hour (kWh) of Leading Chemical Storage Batteries and Supercapacitors 
    Exhibit 4-2:  Worldwide Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries (Volume in MWh Storage) 
    Exhibit 4-3: Worldwide Market for Chemical Grid Batteries (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-4:  World Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Volume in MWh) 
    Exhibit 4-5:  World Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-5:  World Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-6:  Americas Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Volume in MWh) 
    Exhibit 4-7:  Americas Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Revenue in $Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-8:  European Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Volume in MWh) 
    Exhibit 4-9:  European Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-10:  Africa/Middle East Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Volume in MWh) 
    Exhibit 4-11:  Africa/Middle East Market for Chemical Grid Batteries by Use (Revenue in $Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-12:  Asian Market (Exclusive of Japan) for Chemical Grid Batteries by Use (Volume in MWh) 
    Exhibit 4-13:  Asian Market (Exclusive of Japan) for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-14:  Japanese Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Volume in MWh) 
    Exhibit 4-15: Japanese Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Use (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-16:  Worldwide Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Region  (Volume in MWh) 
    Exhibit 4-17:  Worldwide Market for Chemical Grid Storage Batteries by Region (Revenue in  $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-18: Cost of Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Dollars per Megafarad) 
    Exhibit 4-19: World Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Volume in Megafarads) 
    Exhibit 4-20: World Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-21:  Americas Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Volume in Megafarads) 
    Exhibit 4-22: Americas Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-23: European Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Volume in Megafarads) 
    Exhibit 4-24: European Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-25: Middle East/Africa Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Volume in Megafarads) 
    Exhibit 4-26: Middle East/Africa Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-27: Asian (Excluding Japan) Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Volume in Megafarads) 
    Exhibit 4-28: Asian (Excluding Japan) Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-29: Japanese Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Volume in Megafarads) 
    Exhibit 4-30: Japanese Market for Smart Grid Supercapacitors (Revenue in $ Millions) 
    Exhibit 4-31: Worldwide Forecasts for Grid Supercapacitors by Country (Volume in Megafarads) 
    Exhibit 4-32: Worldwide Forecasts for Grid Supercapacitors by Country (Revenue in $ Millions) 

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # nano-599 PUBLISHED December 03, 2012
Smart Glass in the Automotive Sector – 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Advanced Materials
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the worldwide automotive smart glass market, covering self-tinting, self-cleaning, self-healing and device-embedded glass. Eight-year revenue forecasts are included with break outs by type of materials, functionality and the applications within the vehicle in which smart glass is used.  The smart glass applications covered are windshields, mirrors, sunroofs, other automotive windows and dashboards.

    The companies discussed in this report include: 3M, American Glass,  Apple, ASG, AutoGlass, Balcony Systems, BASF, Bayer, Cardinal, Carlex, ChromoGenics, Corning, Dow Chemical, Gentex, Guardian, Hitachi, Hypho Technology, International Trading, NeoView Kolon, Nissan, NSG/Pilkington, Pleotint, RavenBrick, Research Frontiers, Saint-Gobain, Samsung, Solutia/Eastman, Sage, Switch Materials, US e-Chromics, and View.  The report also discusses adoption strategies for smart glass by the major automobile and light truck companies

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One: Applications and Opportunities for Smart Glass in the Automotive Industry
    1.1 Smart Glass and Automotive Applications
    1.1.1 What is Smart Glass?
    1.1.2 Evolution of Smart Glass Functionality
    1.1.3 Four Key Drivers for the Use of Smart Glass in the Automotive Sector
    1.1.4 The Future of Smart Glass in the Automotive Sector
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Smart Glass Technologies and Products for the Automotive Industry:  Current and Future
    2.1 Forecasts and Forecasting Methodology
    2.1.1 Data Sources
    2.1.2 Alternative Scenarios
    2.2 Automotive Glass Industry Trends
    2.2.1 Production Trends in the Automotive Glass Industry and the Impact on Smart Glass Providers
    2.2.2 Current Industry Structure and Component Purchasing Behavior in the Automotive Industry
    2.2.3 Changes Expected in Industry Structure Because of Increased Use of Smart Auto Glass
    2.3 Tinted Glass and Self-Dimming Windows and Mirrors for the Automotive Industry
    2.3.1 A Note on Dimmable Mirrors and Beyond
    2.3.2 Electrochromic Technology in the Automotive Sector
    2.3.3 Thermochromic Technology
    2.3.4 SPD Technology
    2.3.5 Photochromic Technology
    2.3.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Dimming/Self-Tinting Technologies
    2.4 Self-Cleaning Glass
    2.4.1 Self-Cleaning Glass Technology:  Current State of the Art and Future Technology Directions
    2.4.2 Actual and Potential Suppliers of Self-Cleaning Glass Technology
    2.4.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Self-Cleaning Automotive Glass
    2.5 Self-Healing Glass
    2.5.1 Evolution of Self-Repairing Coatings
    2.5.2 Firms Active in the Self-Healing/Self-Repairing Coating Sector
    2.5.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Self-Healing Automotive Glass
    2.6 Device-Enabled Glass for Automotive Applications
    2.6.1 Heads-Up Displays in Windshields
    2.6.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Device-Enabled Automotive Glass
    2.7 Multi-functional Glass in the Automotive Market
    2.8 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Glass in Automotive Sector by Technology
    2.9 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Applications and Markets for Smart Glass in the Automotive Industry
    3.1 Applications and Markets
    3.2 Windshields Markets for Smart Glass
    3.2.1 The Smart Glass Windshield of the Future:  Design and Market Directions
    3.2.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Glass for Windshields
    3.3 Sunroof Markets for Smart Glass
    3.3.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Glass for Sunroofs
    3.4 Dashboards and Augmented Displays
    3.4.1 A Dash of Glass
    3.4.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Glass for Dashboards
    3.5 Smart Automobile Mirrors
    3.5.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Glass for Automobile Mirrors
    3.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Glass for Other Automobile Windows
    3.6 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Glass in Automotive Sector by Aperture
    3.7 Concluding Comments on International Markets for Smart Automotive Glass
    3.8 Key Points from this Chapter
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

     

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit 1-1: The Drivers Shaping Demand for Smart Glass in the Automotive Sector
    Exhibit 2-1: Worldwide Automotive Glass Production
    Exhibit 2-2: Major Customers for Automotive Smart Glass:  The Leading Automotive Groups
    Exhibit 2-3: Electrochromic Smart Glass in the Automotive Market, 2013-2020 (1)
    Exhibit 2-4: Thermochromic Film in the Automotive Market, 2013-2020
    Exhibit 2-5: SPD Film in the Automotive Market, 2013-2020
    Exhibit 2-6: Photochromic Film in the Automotive Market, 2013-2020
    Exhibit 2-7: Summary of Revenue Forecasts for Self-Dimming Technologies in the Automotive Market ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-8: Selected R &D Trends and Institutions in Self-Cleaning Glass
    Exhibit 2-9: Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Cleaning Automotive Glass by Type of End User Product ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-10: Eight-Year Forecast of Self-Healing Automotive Glass ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-11: Eight-Year Forecast of Device Enabled Automotive Glass ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-12: Eight-Year Forecast of Smart Automotive Glass by Technology ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,495.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $1,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,495.00  
REPORT # Nano-603 PUBLISHED November 28, 2012
Flexible Glass Markets, 2013 and Beyond
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Advanced Materials
  • Emerging Electronics
  • SUMMARY

    This report from NanoMarkets quantifies the market opportunities for flexible glass over the next eight years. In the report, we examine the latest technologies, strategies, and technical developments of the flexible glass industry and identify the key applications in which flexible glass will generate revenue for the glass industry in the near- and mid-term.  The report provides granular, eight-year volume (in area) and revenue  ($ US millions) forecasts for this business.

    “Flexible glass” is ultrathin glass that can—as the result of its thinness—be stored and used in roll form. The selling point of flexible glass is that, like plastic-based films, it can, at least in theory, provide a lighter weight, lower cost alternative to rigid glass, yet deliver the superior barrier performance, transparency, temperature stability, and familiarity of glass.

    The opportunities for flexible glass include the following:

    • Flexible glass has a role to play in reducing costs and improving marketability through enabling the production lighter weight products. Enabling lighter weight products is particularly important in mobile computing applications like smart phones and tablets, but it is also of critical importance in many photovoltaics (PV) applications, particularly building-integrated PV.

    • Flexible glass is emerging as a leading candidate for encapsulation of sensitive electronics, particularly in OLED displays, OLED lighting, and organic and dye-sensitized cell PV applications. Flexible glass can enable encapsulation with higher performance, and potentially easier to implement, than some advanced multilayer barrier systems proposed for use in PV and displays.

    • In addition, flexible glass will enable future roll-to-roll (R2R) production of flexible displays, OLED lighting, flexible PV, and other flexible electronics.  In this report, suppliers of flexible glass will find guidance for how – and when – this material will fit into the R2R electronics space.

    Applications for flexible glass covered by this report include:  displays, PV, OLED lighting, and various flexible electronics products (sensors, chips, etc.). NanoMarkets has provided coverage of flexible glass for several years as part of a larger focus on advanced materials for the display, lighting, and solar panel markets.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary: Flexible Glass
    E.1 Market Opportunities for Flexible Glass
    E.1.1 Lowering the Weight of Devices – A Key Proposition for Mobile Computing
    E.1.2 Other Critical Markets for Flexible Glass
    E.1.3 The Promise of Flexibility and R2R Processing
    E.1.4 Encapsulation as a Key Market for Flexible Glass
    E.2 Key Firms to Watch in the Flexible Glass Industry
    E.2.1 Key End-Users
    E.2.2 Key Flexible Glass Suppliers
    E.3 Challenges to Commercialization of Flexible Glass
    E.3.1 Bringing Costs Down
    E.3.2 Competitive Materials
    E.4 Summary of the Eight-Year Forecasts for Flexible Glass
    E.4.1 Summary of Market for Flexible Glass in Displays – Two Views
    E.4.2 Grand Total Summary of the Market for Flexible Glass – All Applications

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Notable Recent Developments in Flexible Glass
    1.1.2 Re-evaluating the Value Proposition of Flexible Glass:  Lower Weight for Initial Revenues
    1.1.3 R2R Display Manufacturing and Flexible Glass:  It's What's Next
    1.1.4 Prospects for Flexible Glass in Photovoltaics
    1.1.5 Flexible Glass and Flexible Displays:  The First Shall Be Last
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: Flexible Glass: Technology, Products, and Key Suppliers
    2.1 Manufacturing Trends and Challenges
    2.1.1 Characteristics of Flexible Glass that Favor its Commercialization
    2.1.2 Manufacturing of Flexible Glass versus Price
    2.1.3 Increasing the Durability of Flexible Glass
    2.1.4 R2R Compatibility and Flexible Glass
    2.1.5 Intrinsically Flexible Devices
    2.1.6 Barrier Properties
    2.2 Competition for Flexible Glass
    2.2.1 Plastics
    2.2.2 Metal Foils and Sheets
    2.2.3 Other Competitive Products
    2.3 Key Suppliers of Flexible Glass
    2.3.1 Asahi Glass Co. (Japan)
    2.3.2 Corning (U.S.)
    2.3.3 LiSEC (U.S.)
    2.3.4 Nippon Electric Glass (Japan)
    2.3.5 Schott
    2.3.6 Competition from China's Glass Industry
    2.4 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Applications and Markets for Flexible Glass
    3.1 Flexible Glass in Display Products
    3.1.1 Mobile Displays – Delivering Lighter Weight
    3.1.2 OLED Displays as a Key Market for Flexible Glass
    3.1.3 Rollable and Foldable Displays
    3.1.4 Encapsulation of OLEDs with Flexible Glass
    3.1.5 Prospects for Flexible Glass in E-Paper Devices
    3.2 Prospects for Flexible Glass in OLED Lighting
    3.2.1 Enabling Longer Lifetimes in OLED Lighting
    3.2.2 Enabling Design Flexibility in OLED Lighting
    3.3 Flexible Glass in Photovoltaics
    3.3.1 Difficulties in the PV Market that Could Influence Prospects for Flexible Glass
    3.3.2 Glass in the Conventional PV Industry – No Room For Flexible Glass?
    3.3.3 The Pros and Cons of Flexible Glass in PV Applications – And a Note of Caution
    3.3.4 Flexible PV—The Importance of TFPV and BIPV to the Future of Flexible Glass in PV
    3.3.5 Newer PV Technologies with Strict Barrier Requirements – OPV and DSC PV
    3.4 Sensors and Other Applications for Flexible Glass
    3.4.1 Touch Panels and Flexible Glass
    3.4.2 Sensors for Ubiquitous Electronics Applications
    3.4.3 Flexible Batteries
    3.4.4 Flexible and Plastic Electronics
    3.5 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts for Flexible Glass
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology and Assumptions
    4.1.1 Methodology
    4.1.2 Scope of the Forecast
    4.1.3 Information Sources
    4.1.4 Pricing Assumptions and Pricing Challenges for Flexible Glass
    4.1.5 Forecasting Assumptions and Changes from Last Year's Forecast
    4.1.6 Alternative Scenarios
    4.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Flexible Glass by Addressable Market
    4.2.1 LCDs
    4.2.2 OLED Displays
    4.2.3 e-Paper Displays
    4.2.4 OLED Lighting
    4.2.5 Photovoltaics Markets
    4.2.6 Sensors and Other Electronic Components
    4.3 Summaries of Eight-Year Forecasts for Flexible Glass
    4.3.1 Summary of Flexible Glass Forecasts by Application
    4.3.2 Summary of Flexible Glass Forecasts by Device Type—Rigid vs. Flexible
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in This Report
    About the Author


    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Summary of Market Value of Flexible Glass in Displays by Display Size/Type and by General Display Category 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit E-2: Summary of Market Value of Flexible Glass by Application and by Device Type 2013-2020 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Corning's Willow Glass
    Exhibit 3-1: Matrix Showing the Motivation for Using Flexible Glass in Different Applications
    Exhibit 3-2: Relative moisture sensitivities of the PV technologies considered in this report.
    Exhibit 3-3: Opportunities for Flexible Large-Area Sensors
    Exhibit 3-4: Overview of Prospects for Printed/Plastic Electronics Applications
    Exhibit 4-1: Analysis of the Addressable Market for Flexible Glass in LCDs 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-2: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in LCDs 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-3: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in LCDs by Display Format (Flexible vs. Rigid) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-4: Analysis of the Addressable Market for Flexible Glass in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-5: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass Substrates in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-6: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass Encapsulation in OLED Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-7: Summary of Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in OLED Displays by Application (Substrate and Encapsulation Applications Combined) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-8: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in OLED Displays by Display Format (Flexible vs. Rigid) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-9: Analysis of the Addressable Market for Flexible Glass in e-Paper Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-10: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in e-Paper Displays 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-11: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in e-Paper Displays by Display Format (Flexible vs. Rigid) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-12: Flexible Glass in the OLED Lighting Market 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-13: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in OLED Lighting by Panel Format (Flexible vs. Rigid) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-14: Analysis of the PV Market 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-15: Flexible Glass Substrates in the PV Market by Application 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-16: Flexible Glass Encapsulation in the PV Market by Application 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-17: Summary of Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in PV Panels by Application (Substrate and Encapsulation Applications Combined) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-18: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in PV Applications by Panel Format (Flexible vs. Rigid) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-19: Sensors and Other Electronics Markets for Flexible Glass Substrates 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-20: Sensors and Other Electronics Markets for Flexible Glass Encapsulation 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-21: Summary of Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in Sensors and Other Electronics Application (Substrate and Encapsulation Applications Combined) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-22: Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass in Sensors and Other Electronics Applications by Product Format (Flexible vs. Rigid) 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-23: Summary of Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass by Application 2013-2020
    Exhibit 4-24: Summary of Area and Market Value of Flexible Glass by Device Type (Rigid vs. Flexible) 2013-2020

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $2,495.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $3,495.00  
REPORT # Nano-591 PUBLISHED November 15, 2012
Self-Cleaning Window Markets – 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Advanced Materials
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    The key objective of this report is to identify and quantify the market for self-cleaning windows worldwide. With regard to quantifying the self-cleaning windows market, we include a detailed eight-year forecast in volume and value terms. The methodology for these projections is to be found in Chapter Three of this report.

    Since the market for self-cleaning windows is one with relatively few participants at the present time, an appraisal of the current self-cleaning windows products on the market and a critical review of some of the latest R&D in this space is presented here.

    Finally, we note that the subject of this report is primarily restricted to self-cleaning windows.  We acknowledge that this is part of bigger trends and we discuss these trends to some extent in what follows. For example, we take a look at how the self-cleaning windows trend fits into more general R&D work targeting self-cleaning surfaces as a whole.

    We also examine how self-cleaning capabilities may be incorporated into conventional insulated glazing units (IGUs) and smart windows.  And we have something to say about self-cleaning capabilities in the solar panel space, a market where there are some overlapping drivers, markets and potentially product integrations with the self-cleaning windows.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One: Self-Cleaning Windows:  Opportunity Analysis and Background to Report
    1.1 Why Self-Cleaning Windows are an Emerging Market Opportunity
    1.1.1 Improving Self-Cleaning Windows Technology
    1.1.2 Impetus for Self-Cleaning Comes from Key Windows Industry Trends
    1.1.3 Investment Outlook for Self-Cleaning Windows
    1.1.4 A Future for Self-Cleaning Windows
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report

    Chapter Two: Rival Technologies and Products for Self-Cleaning Glass
    2.1 Types of Self-Cleaning Windows Technologies and Products
    2.1.1 Market Messaging for Self-Cleaning Windows
    2.2 Hydrophobic Self-Cleaning Windows
    2.2.1 Market Related Advantages and Disadvantages of Hydrophobic Windows
    2.3 Hydrophilic Self-Cleaning Windows
    2.3.1 Photocatalysis Stage
    2.3.2 Hydrophilic Cleaning Stage
    2.3.3 Advantages and Disadvantages of Hydrophilic Windows
    2.4 A Note on ETFE
    2.5 Research and Development Trends
    2.6 Players and Products in the Self-Cleaning Glass:  Industry Structure
    2.6.1 Coatings Firms: Products and Strategies for Self-Cleaning Windows
    2.6.2 Major Glass Makers: Products and Strategies for Self-Cleaning Windows
    2.7 Balcony Systems Solutions:  BalcoNano (U.K.)
    2.8 Cardinal Glass Industries:  Neat Glass (U.S.)
    2.8.1 Technology
    2.9 Cyndan Chemicals:  Vitroglaze (Australia)
    2.9.1 Technology
    2.10 Hypho Technology:  Uri-pel (Singapore)
    2.11 International Trading and Consulting:  NanoCoat (Australia)
    2.12 Lotus Leaf Coatings:  LotusShield and Hydrophil (U.S.)
    2.12.1 LotusShield
    2.12.2 Hydrophil
    2.13 NanoPhos:  SurfaShield (Greece)
    2.14 nanoShell  (U.K.)
    2.14.1 nanoShell Glass
    2.14.2 nanoShell Solar PV
    2.15 nGimat (U.S.)
    2.16 NSG/Pilkington:  Activ  (Japan/U.K.)
    2.16.1 Technology
    2.16.2 The Activ Product Range
    2.17 PPG Industries:  SunClean (U.S.)
    2.17.1 Technology
    2.17.2 SunClean Recently Offered for Commercial Applications
    2.18 RainAway Nanotechnology:  RainAway Nano Self-Cleaning Glass Coat (Malaysia)
    2.19  Reactive Surfaces: DeGreez (U.S.)
    2.20 Saint-Gobain:  Aquaclean and Bioclean (France)
    2.20.1 Bioclean
    2.21 Shanghai Huzheng Nano Technology (China)
    2.22  Viridian Glass
    2.23 Opportunities for Self-Cleaning Coatings in Solar Panels
    2.23.1 Technologies Used
    2.24 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Self-Cleaning Windows: Applications and Forecasts
    3.1 Creating an Analytical Framework for the Self-Cleaning Windows Sector
    3.1.1 Macroeconomic Assumptions
    3.1.2 Assumptions About the Construction Industry
    3.1.3 Secondary Sources of Information
    3.2 Key Selling Features and Value Propositions for Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.2.1 Convenience-Justified Adoption of Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.2.2 Visibility-Justified Adoption of Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.3 Limitations on the Market for Self-Cleaning Windows:
    3.3.1 Climate-Related Limitations
    3.3.2 Limitations Deriving from the Location of the Facility
    3.3.3 "Chemical" Limitations on the Market for Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.4  Analysis and Eight-Year Forecast of End User Markets for Self-Cleaning Windows Markets
    3.4.1 Breakout of Self-Cleaning Windows Market by Type of Building
    3.4.2 Breakout of Self-Cleaning Windows Market by Retrofits/New Builds
    3.4.3 Breakout of Self-Cleaning Windows Market by Technology
    3.5 Future Enhanced Markets for Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.5.1 Solar Panels and Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.5.2 Other Enhanced/Multi-Functional Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.5.3 Eight-Year Forecast of Enhanced Self-Cleaning Windows
    3.6 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

     

    List of Exhibits

     

    Exhibit 2-1: How Self-Cleaning Glass Fits into Current Energy and Other "Megatrends"
    Exhibit 2-2: Selected R &D Trends and Institutions in Self-Cleaning Glass
    Exhibit 2-3: Players and Products in the Self-Cleaning Windows Space
    Exhibit 2-4: Self-Cleaning Coatings Firms:  Comparative Listing
    Exhibit 2-5: Self-Cleaning Windows Firms:  Comparative Listing
    Exhibit 2-6: Pilkington Activ Product Range
    Exhibit 3-1: Core Selling Features for Self-Cleaning Windows
    Exhibit 3-3: Analysis of Self-Cleaning Windows Market by Type of Building ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-4: Analysis of Self-Cleaning Windows Market by Retrofit/New Builds ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-5: Analysis of Self-Cleaning Windows Market by Technology ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-6: Analysis of Self-Cleaning Windows Market by Levels/Type of Integration      ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $2,495.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,995.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $3,495.00  
REPORT # Nano-593 PUBLISHED November 07, 2012
Markets for Low-Cost Sensors 2012
CATEGORIES :
  • Emerging Electronics
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    This new report from NanoMarkets quantifies the markets for low-cost sensors over the next eight years. In the report, we examine the latest technologies, strategies, and technical developments of the sensor industry and identify the applications in which low-cost sensors can generate revenue for suppliers. The report provides granular, eight-year volume and revenue forecasts for this business.

    The low-cost sensor applications covered by this report include: smart packaging for consumer goods; pharmaceutical smart packaging and healthcare-related applications; interactive media and disposable electronics applications; lighting applications, including both standalone lighting control units and smart lighting systems; building aut0mation systems; and diagnostic test strips for monitoring of, for example, blood glucose or cholesterol levels in conjunction with an electronic meter.

    NanoMarkets has provided coverage of sensors markets for several years as part of a larger focus on the low-cost and printed electronics markets, and in this report we share the insights that we have garnered into the market opportunities that will emerge and grow for low-cost sensors in key application areas.

    The low-cost sensor market will continue to grow over the next decade, driven largely by the need for better diagnostics for an aging (and ailing) population, as well as by the growth of low-cost electronics for a variety of applications and smart packaging products with integrated sensing capabilities:

    • The latter applications are part of larger trends toward ubiquitous electronics and the “Internet-of-things”, which are finally showing signs of real growth after percolating under the radar for several years.

    • Low-cost sensors are key enablers for these trends, because the concept of putting electronics into everyday objects of all kinds calls for very low-cost components, including sensors. Importantly, it is in these new low-cost electronics applications that NanoMarkets believes some of the most exciting, i.e. highest growth, opportunities in the low-cost sensor sector lie.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One  Background and Objectives of this Report
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Low-Cost Electronics as a Market for Low-Cost Sensors
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report

    Chapter Two: Low-Cost Sensor Technologies and Products
    2.1 Low Cost Sensors:  Key Issues
    2.1.1 Definition of Low-Cost Sensors
    2.1.2 The Importance of Printing to the Low-Cost Sensor Value Proposition
    2.3 Diagnostic Test Strips – The Biggest Market for Low-Cost Sensors
    2.3 Other Applications for Low-Cost Sensors
    2.3.1 Low-Cost Sensors in Smart Packaging of Consumer Goods
    2.3.2 Low-Cost Sensors in Pharmaceutical Packaging and Healthcare-Related Smart Applications
    2.3.3 Interactive Media and Disposable Electronics
    2.3.4 Low-Cost Sensors in Lighting Applications
    2.3.5 Low-Cost Sensors in Building Automation

    Chapter Three: Forecasts for Low-Cost Sensors
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    3.1.1 General Methodology
    3.1.2 Data Sources
    3.1.3 Scope of the Forecast
    3.1.4 Economic Assumptions
    3.1.5 Alternative Scenarios
    3.2 Eight-Year Forecasts for Low-Cost Sensors
    3.2.1 Forecasts of Diagnostic Test Strips
    3.2.2 Forecasts of Low-Cost Sensors in Pharmaceutical Smart Packaging and Healthcare-Related Applications
    3.2.3 Forecasts for Low-Costs Sensors in Interactive Media and Disposable Electronics
    3.2.4 Eight-Year Forecasts for Low-Cost Sensors in Lighting
    3.2.5 Eight-Year Forecasts for Low-Cost Sensors in Building Automation
    3.3 Summaries of Eight-Year Forecasts for Low-Cost Sensors
    3.3.1 Summary by Application
    3.3.2 Summary by Sensor Type

    Abbreviations and Acronyms Used in this Report
    About the Author

     

    List of Exhibits


    Exhibit 2-1: Advantages of Printing for Fabricating Low-Cost Sensors 
    Exhibit 2-2:  Survey of Printed Sensor Research Devices 
    Exhibit 2-2:  Survey of Printed Sensor Research Devices
    Exhibit 3-1: Analysis of the Diagnostic Test Strips Market 2012-2019 
    Exhibit 3-2: Analysis of Low-Cost Sensors in Smart Packaging Applications for Consumer Goods 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-3: Analysis of Pharmaceutical Smart Packaging and Healthcare-Related Smart Applications for Low-Cost Sensors 2012-2019 
    Exhibit 3-4: Analysis of Interactive Media* and Disposable Electronics Applications for Low-Cost Sensors 2012-2019 
    Exhibit 3-5: Analysis of Low-Cost Sensors in Lighting Applications 2012-2019 
    Exhibit 3-6: Analysis of Low-Cost Sensors in Novel, Low-End Building Automation Applications 2012-2019 
    Exhibit 3-7: Summary of the Low-Cost Sensor Market by Application 2012-2019 
    Exhibit 3-8: Summary of Low-Cost Sensor Market by Sensor Type 2012-2019 

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-587 PUBLISHED November 06, 2012
Printed Electronics Version 3.0: A Market Forecast
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Emerging Electronics
  • SUMMARY

    The report quantifies these opportunities in terms of revenues generated by PE V3.0 at three levels of the value chain.  In addition, to an eight-year forecast of PE-enabled products, the report also contains projections of PE components and specialist inks.  The components covered are thin-film transistors, memories, batteries, sensors, displays and lighting.  The organizations discussed include: Agilent, Bank of America, Bemis, DuPont Teijin, eBay, E Ink, Enfucell, Esquire Magazine, Fujifilm Dimatix, GE, Gemalto, HelioVolt, Holst Centre, ISET, Jenn Feng, Kovio, MasterCard, Merck, Mitsubishi, Panasonic, Nanosolar, Oxford Photovoltaics, PARC, Pioneer, PolyIC, PragmaticIC, Pragmatic Printing, Plastic Logic, Printed Electronics Limited, Qolpac, Samsung, Seiko Epson, SolarPrint, Sumitomo, Thin Film Electronics, Tokyo Electron, and UDC.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One: Printed Electronics V3.0: A Summary of Opportunities
    1.1 Printing as Strategy and Printing as Tactics:  An Approach to Market Segmentation
    1.2 Objectives and Coverage of this Report
    1.3 Printed Electronics:  The First Two Phases and their Consequences
    1.3.1 Printed Electronics Phase I:  Printed Electronics is Thick-Film Electronics
    1.3.2 Printed Electronics Phase II:  Printed Electronics as a New Industry
    1.4 Printed Electronics V3.0:  The New PE
    1.5 Short-to-Medium Term Applications for Printed Electronics
    1.5.1 Smart Packaging:  Pharma, Food and Brand Enhancement
    1.5.2 PE and Security Printing
    1.5.3 Smart Cards: Adding Printed Batteries and Displays for Enhanced Security
    1.5.4 Medical Devices:  Patches, Bandages and Diagnostics
    1.5.5 PE and Biochips
    1.5.6 Interactive Media and Disposable Electronics
    1.6 Longer-Term Opportunities for PE V3.0
    1.6.1 Displays for Mobile Devices and Televisions
    1.6.2 Printed Lighting
    1.6.3 Printed Solar Panels
    1.7 Supply Chain and Ecosystem Opportunities
    1.8 Opportunities for the Printing/Printing Equipment Industry:  Printing Electronics Isn't As Easy as it Looks!
    1.9 Eight-Year Forecasts of Products Enabled by PE V3.0

    Chapter Two:  Technology Enablers and Components for the "New" Printed Electronics
    2.1 Printed Electronic Components: Mostly Still Evolving
    2.1.1 Processors and Memories:  Organic or Silicon
    2.1.2 Printed Displays:  Technology Options
    2.1.3 Printed Lighting:  Current Projects
    2.1.4 Printed Sensors
    2.1.5 RFID and Lesser Tagging
    2.1.6 Printed Batteries
    2.1.7 Evolution of Printed Photovoltaics Technology
    2.2 Printed Electronics in Packaging:  Why Packaging Must Become Smart
    2.2.1 The Limitations of Smart Packaging as a Target Market for PE
    2.2.2 Food and Personal Care Smart Packaging Applications
    2.2.3 Pharmaceutical and Healthcare-Related Smart Packaging:  Compliance Packaging
    2.2.4 Brand Security
    2.2.5 Eight-Year Market Forecast of PE-Enabled Smart Packaging
    2.3 A Growing Need for Powered Smart Cards
    2.3.1 Smart Card Chips
    2.3.2 Printed Batteries and Displays in Powered Smart Cards
    2.3.3 Eight-Year Market Forecast of PE-Enabled Smart Cards
    2.4 PE Innovations for Medical Devices and Disposables
    2.4.1 Medical and Cosmetic Patches
    2.4.2 Smart Bandages
    2.4.3 CPR Cards
    2.4.4 Eight-Year Market Forecast of PE-Enabled Medical Devices
    2.5 Interactive Printed Media and Disposable Electronics
    2.5.1 Some Skeptical Thoughts on This Sector
    2.5.2 Eight-Year Market Forecast of PE-Enabled Disposable Electronics and Interactive Printed Media
    2.6 Printed Displays for Mobile Devices and Televisions
    2.6.1 Eight-Year Market Forecast of PE-Enabled Mobile and TV Displays
    2.7 Printed OLED Lighting
    2.8 Printed Solar Cells
    2.9 Summary of PE V3.0 Components Forecasts

    Chapter Three: Opportunities for Inks and Other Key Materials for the New Printed Electronics
    3.1 Electronic Inks:  Current and Future Materials
    3.1.1 The Future of PE Inks
    3.1.2 Printing Processes That Are Being Used in the PE V3.0 Era
    3.2 Conductive Inks and Pastes for PE V3.0
    3.2.1 Silver and Nano-Silver Inks
    3.2.2 Gold Inks
    3.2.3 Copper Inks
    3.2.4 Other Metallic Inks and Polymer Electrodes
    3.2.5 Transparent Conductor Inks
    3.3 Semiconductor Inks for PE V3.0
    3.3.1 Organic Semiconductors and Printing
    3.3.2 Silicon Inks and Electronics
    3.3.3 Other Semiconductor Inks and Materials Sets:  Is PE V3.0 CMOS Possible?
    3.4 Some Thoughts on Printed Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene in the Future of Printed Electronics
    3.5 Substrate and Encapsulants for PE V3.0 Applications
    3.5.1 The Future of PE Substrates
    3.5.2 Some Notes on Encapsulation for PE V3.0
    3.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of PE 3.0 Inks
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit 1-1: The Three Phases of Printed Electronics Development
    Exhibit 1-2: Market Segmentation
    Exhibit 1-3: Summary of Final Market Value of PE 3.0 Enabled Products with a High PE V3.0 Content
    Exhibit 2-1: Printed Components Used in Next-Generation Low-Cost Printed Electronics Applications
    Exhibit 2-2: OTFT/OFET Device Performance Trends
    Exhibit 2-3: Overview of Prospects for Low-Performance Applications for Organic/Printed Logic and Memory
    Exhibit 2-4: Survey of Printed Sensor Research Devices
    Exhibit 2-5: Advantages of Printing for Fabricating Large-Area Sensors
    Exhibit 2-6: Printed CIGS Firms
    Exhibit 2-7: Eight-Year Market Forecast of Component-Level Revenues Generated by PE-Enabled Smart Packaging ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-8: Eight-Year Market Forecast of Component-Level Revenues Generated by PE-Enabled Smart Cards ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-9: Eight-Year Market Forecast of Component-Level Revenues Generated by PE-Enabled Medical Devices ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-10: Eight-Year Market Forecast of Component-Level Revenues Generated by Disposable Electronics/Interactive Printed Media ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-11: Eight-Year Market Forecast of PE Revenues Generated by Mobile Devices and Televisions Display Modules ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-12: Eight-Year Market Forecast of Printed OLED Lighting Panels ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-13: Eight-Year Market Forecast of PE Revenues Generated by PV Panels ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-14: Summary of Market Value of PE V3.0 Components by Application  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-15: Summary of Market Value of PE V3.0 Components and Materials by Type
    Exhibit 3-1: Comparison of Common Printing Processes Used In Printed Electronics
    Exhibit 3-2: Major Conductors:  Rankings of Main Characteristics
    Exhibit 3-3: Summary of Market Value of Selected PE V3.0 Inks by Type  ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-585 PUBLISHED October 26, 2012
Powered Smart Card Markets– 2012
CATEGORIES :
  • Emerging Electronics
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY
    This report, which quantifies the markets for powered smart cards and their major components. Specifically, the objective of this report is to quantify the markets for powered smart cards by application and by region, and to quantity the market for two key components of powered smart cards—batteries and displays—over the next eight years, in both volume/quantity and revenue terms.
     
    We examine the latest component technologies, strategies, and technical developments of the industry.  NanoMarkets has provided coverage of powered smart cards now for several years as part of its analysis of the markets for low-cost displays and printed batteries, and in this report we share the insights that we have garnered into the market opportunities that will emerge and grow in the powered smart card market.
     
    The powered smart card end-use markets covered by this report include: one-time password (OTP) cards, gift and customer loyalty cards, and identification (ID) or medical information cards. We also assess the differences in the potentials for powered smart cards in these applications by region, namely in Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the Americas.
     
    Batteries for powered smart cards are broken out into two general categories:  printed batteries, which dominate the market for onboard power today, and thin-film batteries, which have the potential to be adopted more widely in the coming years.  Display technologies used in powered smart card applications include liquid crystal displays (LCDs), light-emitting diode (LED) displays, electrophoretic displays (EPDs), and electrochromic displays.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Chapter One: Background and Objectives of this Report    
    1.1 Background to this Report    
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report    

    Chapter Two: Powered Smart Card Technologies and Products    
    2.1 Powered Smart Cards:  Competitive Advantages and Disadvantages Compared to Other Smart Cards    
    2.1.1 Comparison with Conventional Smart Cards    
    2.1.2 Advantages of Powered Smart Cards    
    2.2 Enhanced Functionality—Which Smart Card Applications Need Power?    
    2.2.1 One-Time Password Cards for Enhanced Security    
    2.2.2 Customer Loyalty and Gift Cards    
    2.2.3 Secure ID, Medical Information, and Biometric Cards    
    2.3 An Overview of Some Current Powered Smart Card Products    
    2.3.1 E-Bay/PayPal Security Key    
    2.3.2 MasterCard and Visa OTP Cards—Losing Ground to Mobile Solutions?    
    2.3.3 Powered Smart Card Manufacturers    
    2.4 Components and Technologies for Powered Smart Cards    
    2.4.1 Thin-Film and Printed Batteries for Powered Smart Cards—Important Factors    
    2.4.2 Suppliers of Batteries for Powered Smart Cards    
    2.4.3 Display Types Used in Powered Smart Cards    
    2.4.4 Other Components: Solar Power, Biometric Sensors, Keypads, Etc.    
    2.5 Key Points from this Chapter    

    Chapter Three: Powered Smart Card Markets and Forecasts    
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology    
    3.1.1 General Methodology    
    3.1.2 Data Sources    
    3.1.3 Scope of the Forecast    
    3.1.4 Assumptions    
    3.1.5 Alternative Scenarios    
    3.2 Eight-Year Forecast of Powered Smart Cards    
    3.2.1 Powered Smart Card Shipment Forecast    
    3.2.2 Powered Smart Card Shipment Revenue Forecast by Application    
    3.2.3 Powered Smart Card Shipment and Revenue Forecast by Region  of Use    
    3.2.4 Forecast of Batteries for Powered Smart Cards    
    3.2.5 Forecast of Displays for Powered Smart Cards    
    Acronyms and Abbreviations    
    About the Author    

    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit 2-1: Advantages and Disadvantages of Powered Smart Cards    
    Exhibit 2-2: Overview of Selected Powered Smart Card Providers    
    Exhibit 3-1: Analysis of Smart Card Market 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-2: Powered Smart Cards by Application 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-3: Powered Smart Cards by Region 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-4: Printed Batteries in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-5: Thin-Film Batteries in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-6: Summary of Volume of Batteries in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019 (Millions)    
    Exhibit 3-7: Summary of Market Value of Batteries in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019 ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 3-8: Analysis of Addressable Market for Displays in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-9: Electrophoretic and Related Displays in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-10: Electrochromic Displays in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-11: Liquid Crystal Displays in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-12: Light-Emitting Diode Displays in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019    
    Exhibit 3-13: Summary of Quantity of Displays in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019 (Millions)    
    Exhibit 3-14: Summary of Market Value of Displays in Powered Smart Cards 2012-2019 ($ Millions)
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-583 PUBLISHED October 22, 2012
Building-Integrated Photovoltaics Markets – 2012
CATEGORIES :
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY
    Building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) represents the merging of the building materials and solar panel business, with the "integration" part of the equation implying everything from novel forms of attachment to a building through to full-scale monolithic integration of PV layers into a tile or window.

    NanoMarkets has been covering the BIPV market now for more than six years and has published numerous industry analysis reports in this space. We believe that BIPV will prove to be a pathway to creating far larger addressable markets for PV in the future.  The BIPV concept will also enable the solar panel industry to create products with higher value added and wider profit margins than the now highly commoditized conventional panels.

    In this eight-year market forecast report, NanoMarkets brings together all of our industry analysis to paint a complete quantitative picture of where the BIPV industry is today and where it is headed in the next eight years. The report covers the BIPV roof, BIPV wall and BIPV glass categories and all of the products that make them up; twelve different BIPV products. Projections are also provided for BIPV products with breakouts by the type of building into which they are sold, the region of the world into which they are sold, and the types of materials that they use.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Chapter One: Forecasting Assumptions and Methodology
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Definition of BIPV
    1.2 General Forecasting Philosophy
    1.3 Macroeconomic and Regulatory Assumptions
    1.4 Pricing Assumptions and Units of Measurement
    1.5 Sources of Information
    1.6 Alternative Scenarios
    1.7 Scope and Limitations of this Report

    Chapter Two: Eight-Year Forecasts of BIPV Products by Type
    2.1 Forecast of BIPV as Share of Total PV Market
    2.2 Forecast of Non-Glass BIPV Roofing Markets
    2.2.1  Roofing Overlay/BAPV Forecast:  Shipment Volumes, Market Value and Materials Used
    2.2.2 Forecast of Other Rigid BIPV Roofing Products: Shipment Volumes, Market Value and Materials Used
    2.2.3 Forecasts of Flexible BIPV Roofing Products: Shipment Volumes, Market Value and Materials Used
    2.2.4 Forecasts Monolithically Integrated BIPV Roofing Products:  Shipment Volumes, Market Value and Materials Used
    2.2.5 Summary of BIPV Roofing Forecasts by Product
    2.3 Forecast of BIPV Wall Markets
    2.3.1 Forecast of Wall-Attached PV:  Shipment Volumes, Market Value and Materials Used
    2.3.2 Forecast of Roofing BIPV Repurposed for Wall Applications: Shipment Volumes, Market Value and Materials Used
    2.3.3 Forecasts of Dedicated BIPV Siding:  Shipment Volumes, Market Value and Materials Used
    2.3.4 Forecasts of BIPV Curtain Walls:  Shipment Volumes, Market Value and Materials Used
    2.3.5 Summary of BIPV Walling Forecasts by Product
    2.4 BIPV Glass
    2.4.1 Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type PV Technology Used
    2.4.2 Forecast of BIPV Glass by Area Shipped
    2.4.3 Forecast of BIPV Glass by Revenues
    2.4.4 Forecast of BIPV Glass by Type of Product
    2.5 Summary of BIPV Industry Revenues by Product Type

    Chapter Three:    Eight-Year Forecasts of BIPV Products by End User Markets
    3.1 BIPV:  Types of End User Markets
    3.2 Forecast of BIPV Revenues by Type of Building
    3.2.1 Forecast BIPV Revenues from "Prestige" Buildings:  Type of BIPV Products Used
    3.2.2 Forecast of BIPV Revenues from Other Commercial and Governmental Buildings:  Type of BIPV Products Used
    3.2.3 Forecast of BIPV Revenues from Industrial Buildings:  Type of BIPV Products Used
    3.2.4 Forecast of BIPV Revenues from Residential Buildings:  Type of BIPV Products Used
    3.2.5 Summary of Forecasts by Type of Building
    3.3 Forecast of BIPV by Retrofit versus New Construction:  By Type of BIPV Product
    3.3.1 BIPV Roofing Considerations
    3.3.2 BIPV Glass Considerations
    3.4 Forecasts of BIPV Roofing by Region:  By Type of BIPV Product

    Chapter Four:    Eight-Year Forecasts of BIPV Products by Major Materials Used
    4.1 Forecast of Absorber Materials
    4.1.1 Crystalline Silicon BIPV:  By Type of BIPV Product
    4.1.2 Thin-Film Silicon BIPV:  By Type of BIPV Product
    4.1.3 CdTe BIPV:  By Type of BIPV Product
    4.1.4 CIGS BIPV:  By Type of BIPV Product
    4.1.5 OPV/DSC BIPV:  By Type of BIPV Product
    4.2 Encapsulation Materials for BIPV Panels
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit 2-1:  BIPV:  Share of Worldwide PV Markets by BIPV Product (1)    
    Exhibit 2-2: BIPV Roofing by Type of Product (MWs)    
    Exhibit 2-3: BIPV Roofing Overlay Market    
    Exhibit 2-4: Rigid BIPV Roofing Market    
    Exhibit 2-5: Flexible BIPV Roofing Market    
    Exhibit 2-6:  Monolithically Integrated BIPV Roofing Market    
    Exhibit 2-7:  Summary of BIPV Roofing Products Market    
    Exhibit 2-8: Market for BIPV Roofing:  By PV Technology (MW)    
    Exhibit 2-9:  WAPV Wall Shipments by End User    
    Exhibit 2-10:  WAPV Material Shipments by Type of PV Technology Used ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 2-11:  BIPV Walls Using Repurposed BIPV Roofing Products:  Shipments by End Users    
    Exhibit 2-12:  BIPV Walls Using Repurposed BIPV Roofing Products: Shipments by Type of PV Technology Used ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 2-13:  BIPV Siding: Shipments by End Users    
    Exhibit 2-14:  BIPV Siding Products: Shipments by Type of PV Technology Used ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 2-15:  BIPV Curtain Walls: Shipments by End Users    
    Exhibit 2-16:  BIPV Curtain Walls: Shipments by Type of PV Technology Used ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 2-17:  BIPV Walling Markets by Type of BIPV Wall Product    
    Exhibit 2-18:  BIPV Glass Markets by PV Materials/Technology (MW)    
    Exhibit 2-19:  BIPV Glass Markets by PV Materials/Technology (Millions Square Meters)    
    Exhibit 2-20:  BIPV Glass Markets by PV Materials/Technology ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 2-21:  BIPV Glass Markets by Product Type (MW)    
    Exhibit 2-22:  BIPV Glass Markets by Product Type (Millions of Square Meters)    
    Exhibit 2-23:  BIPV Glass Markets by Product Type ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 2-24:  BIPV Markets by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 3-1:  Prestige Building Markets for BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 3-2: Commercial and Governmental Building Markets for BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 3-3: Industrial Building Markets for BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 3-4: Residential Building Markets for BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 3-5:  Worldwide Building Markets for BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 3-6:  Worldwide Building Markets for BIPV by Retrofit/New Construction ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 3-7: BIPV Market by Region ($ Millions)    
    Exhibit 4-1:  c-Si BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 4-2:  Thin-Film Silicon BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 4-3:  CdTe BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 4-4:  CIGS BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 4-5:  OPV/DSC BIPV by Product Class ($ Million)    
    Exhibit 4-6: Total  BIPV Substrate and Encapsulation Revenue by BIPV Module Type
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-579 PUBLISHED October 18, 2012
Building Attached Photovoltaics Markets
CATEGORIES :
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY

    The report analyzes and pinpoints the opportunities that are likely to emerge in the BAPV market in the next few years.  Within the report we quantify those opportunities in a series of forecast charts and tables that are provided in both value and volume terms.  Volume shipments are forecasted in terms of area covered and MW shipped.  Breakouts in the forecasts are provided by type of building, type of BAPV products roofing and key absorber materials used. In addition, we project the nations and regions that will generate the most revenues for BAPV.

    The report also addresses both the kinds of buildings and the parts of buildings that BAPV products should be targeted and how manufacturers of BAPV can make the best transition to the time when BIPV surpasses BAPV in market dominance.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 BAPV vs. BIPV:  Definitions and Distinctions
    1.1.2 BAPV:  Already Generating Significant Revenues
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two: BAPV Product Design Trend and Technology Utilization
    2.1 Segmenting the BAPV Market by Product Type
    2.1.1 What Is Wrong BIPV?
    2.1.2 BAPV as a BIPV Precursor: BAPV is an Immediate BIPV-Like Opportunity
    2.2 Types of BAPV Products
    2.2.1 Defining BAPV Opportunities: Aesthetics and Fasteners as the Key to Success
    2.2.2 The Aesthetics of BAPV
    2.3 BAPV Roofing Opportunities: Products Already in the Market but More Needed
    2.3.1 Until Recently All BAPV Roofing Strategies Have Been Local
    2.3.2 Roofing Overlay Products Emerging
    2.3.3 Soltecture and Lumeta:  Showing the Way to the Future BAPV Overlay Roof?
    2.3.4 Technology Evolution for Roofing Overlays and Transition to BIPV
    2.4 Wall Attached-PV:  Another Immediate Opportunity
    2.4.1 What Factors Are Driving Wall-Based BAPV?
    2.4.2 Wall-Attached PV: Current State of the Art
    2.4.3 Wall-Attached PV: Future Trends and Opportunities
    2.4.4 BAPV and Curtain Walls
    2.4.5 BISEM's Project at the Sacramento Municipal Utility Commission
    2.5  BAPV Opportunities for the Glass Market
    2.5.1 Firms to Watch in the PV Glass Sector
    2.6  The BAPV Market Considered by Types of Absorber Layer
    2.6.1 BAPV and Crystalline Silicon
    2.6.2 BAPV and Thin-Film PV
    2.6.3 OPV, DSC and BAPV
    2.7 Key Points from this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Eight-Year Forecasts of BAPV Markets
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    3.1.1 Sources of Information
    3.2 Regulatory and Subsidy Factors Impacting BIPV Walls
    3.2.1  BAPV and Zero-Energy Buildings
    3.2.2 Building Codes, LEED and BAPV
    3.2.3 BIPV Subsidies and BAPV
    3.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of BAPV Markets
    3.3.1 Forecast of BAPV’s Share of the PV Market
    3.3.2 BAPV Roofing Overlays:  Market and Materials Forecasts
    3.3.3 Walling-Attached PV:  Market and Materials Forecasts
    3.3.4 Highly-Customized BAPV/BIPV Glass:  Market and Materials Forecasts
    3.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of BAPV Markets by Type of Building
    3.4.1  Prestige Buildings
    3.4.2  Other Commercial and Government Buildings
    3.4.3  Industrial Buildings
    3.4.4  Residential Buildings
    3.4.5  Forecast of Revenues from BAPV by Type of Building
    3.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of BAPV Markets by Retrofit/New Build
    3.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of BAPV Markets by Geographical Region
    3.7 Key Points from this Chapter

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit 2-1: BAPV  Market Opportunities by Functionality and Product Type
    Exhibit 2-2: Aesthetic Advantages and Disadvantages of BAPV/BIPV Roofing
    Exhibit 2-3: BAPV Roofing Overlays Anticipated Roofing Evolution
    Exhibit 2-4: Major Firms Active in the BAPV/BIPV  Glass Space, by Type of PV Technology
    Exhibit 2-5: Advantages and Disadvantages of Major PV Absorber Materials for BAPV Walling
    Exhibit 2-6: Suitability of Thin-Film PV Materials for BAPV
    Exhibit 3-1: Common Building Requirements for BIPV
    Exhibit 3-2: BAPV Markets  Share of Worldwide PV and BAPV Markets
    Exhibit 3-3: BAPV Roofing/Roofing Overlay Markets (MW)
    Exhibit 3-4: BAPV Roofing/Roofing Overlay Market
    Exhibit 3-5: Walling-Attached PV Markets
    Exhibit 3-6: WAPV  Shipments by Type of PV Technology Used ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-7: Highly-Customized PV Glass Markets
    Exhibit 3-8: BAPV Markets by Type of End User ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-9: BAPV Market by Region ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-577 PUBLISHED October 12, 2012
OLED Lighting Materials Market Forecast 2013
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • OLEDs
  • SUMMARY

    This is NanoMarkets latest report on the commercial development of materials used in OLED lighting applications.  In the report, we review the key technical and commercial developments of the past year and provide granular, eight-year volume and revenue forecasts for this business. Forecasts are provided for all key materials in the OLED stack – substrates, electrodes, emitters and hosts, hole and electron transport/injection/blocking materials, and encapsulation materials.

    Pioneering OLED firms are poised to move beyond luxury luminaires and designer kits over the next few years and into larger, general illumination applications like office lighting. These pioneering firms will shape which materials will be used. NanoMarkets therefore believes that now is the time for its clients to become better acquainted with opportunities emerging from this important sector:

    • OLED lighting will eventually emerge as the largest addressable market for OLED materials, but only if advances in materials can help to close several remaining technology gaps related to improved OLED lighting efficiency, lifetime, and total cost of ownership. Thus, this report is an essential guide for materials and specialty chemical firms seeking to gain a competitive edge for their OLED materials in this emerging market. This report provides insight into the developing opportunities, paying special attention to the opportunities for OLED lighting materials that will develop over the next 18 months or so.

    • OLED lighting panel manufacturers will learn from this report how recent leaps forward in encapsulation technology are enabling new markets for OLED lighting, such as larger lighting panels for office illlumination.  Among the important issues that this report discusses are the continued importance of a move toward all-phosphorescent OLED stacks and the potential for solution processing to help reduce costs. 

    In addition to above analysis, this definitive report on the markets for OLED lighting materials also names the winners and losers in this market and examines the product development and marketing strategies of major players in the OLED encapsulation sector, from large multinationals like DuPont Displays and Merck to specialty firms like UDC and Cambrios.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Chapter One: Introduction: Objectives and Plan of This Report

    Chapter Two: OLED Lighting Materials Trends and Opportunities
    2.1 Changes in the OLED Lighting Materials Business Since Our Last Report
    2.1.1 Slow Takeoff of the OLED Lighting Market – Factors Holding Up Materials Demand
    2.1.2 The Importance of Reducing Materials Costs in OLED Lighting
    2.1.3 The Importance of OLED Lighting Panel Performance
    2.1.4 The Latest Technical Developments in OLED Lighting Materials
    2.1.5 The Future of Solution-Processing in OLED Lighting
    2.1.6 What Ever Happened to Polymer OLEDs?
    2.2 The OLED Materials Supply Structure
    2.2.1 The Role of IP and the Importance of Phosphorescent Emitter Systems
    2.2.2 Key Customers of OLED Lighting Materials – Trends and Needs

    Chapter Three: Eight-Year Forecasts for OLED Lighting Materials
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    3.1.1 General Methodology
    3.1.2 Scope
    3.1.3 Information Sources
    3.2 Forecasting Assumptions and Changes from Last Year’s Report
    3.2.1 OLED Lighting Area Forecasts
    3.2.2 General Economic Assumptions
    3.2.3 Pricing Assumptions
    3.2.4 Alternative Scenarios
    3.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Lighting Materials by Material Type and Deposition Method
    3.3.1 Cathode Materials
    3.3.2 EML Materials: Emitters and Hosts
    3.3.3 ETL materials
    3.3.4 HTL, EBL, HBL
    3.3.5 HIL Materials
    3.3.6 Anode Materials
    3.3.7 Encapsulation
    3.4 Eight-Year Forecasts for OLED Lighting Substrates
    3.4.1 Rigid Glass Substrates
    3.4.2 Flexible Glass
    3.4.3 Plastic Substrates
    3.4.4 Metal Foils as OLED Lighting Substrates
    3.4.5 Summary of OLED Lighting Substrate Forecasts
    3.5 Summaries of Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Lighting Materials
    3.5.1 Summary of the Market Value of the Core OLED Functional Materials by Deposition Method and by OLED Type
    3.5.2 Grand Total Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for OLED Lighting Materials

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

     

    Exhibit 2-1: Overview of OLED Lighting “State-of-the-Art” Technical Characteristics
    Exhibit 2-2: Overview of Other Notable OLED Materials Firms By Region
    Exhibit 3-1: OLED Lighting Shipments by Application 2012-2019 (OLED Panel Area, Millions m2)
    Exhibit 3-2: Area of Vapor-Deposited Small-Molecule OLED Lighting Panels by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-3: Area of Solution-Processed Small-Molecule OLED Lighting Panels by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-4: Area of Polymer OLED Lighting Panels by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-5: OLED Lighting by Active Material Type 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-6: Estimated Average OLED Functional Materials Prices, 2012 - 2019 ($/g)
    Exhibit 3-7: Estimated Average Materials Costs of Different Layers in OLED Lighting Panels, 2012 - 2019 ($/m2)
    Exhibit 3-8: Cathode Area and Value in OLED Lighting Panels by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-9: Quantity and Value of Vapor-Deposited Small-Molecule Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-10: Quantity and Value of Solution-Processed Small-Molecule Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-11: Quantity and Value of Light-Emitting Polymers (LEPs) in OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-12: Summaries of Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Lighting 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-13 Summary of Emitter and Host Materials in OLED Lighting by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-14: Quantity and Market Value of ETL Materials in Vapor-Deposited Small-Molecule OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-15: Quantity and Market Value of ETL Materials in Solution-Processed Small-Molecule OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-16: Summary of ETL Materials in OLED Lighting by Deposition Method 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-17: Summary of Electron Transport Layer Materials in OLED Lighting by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-18: Quantity and Market Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in Vapor-Deposited Small-Molecule OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-19: Quantity and Market Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in Solution-Processed Small Molecule OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-20: Quantity and Value of HTL/EBL/HBL Materials in Polymer OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-21: Summary of HTL/EBL/HBL OLED Lighting Materials 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-22: Summary of Hole Transport and Electron/Hole Blocking Layer Materials in OLED Lighting by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-23: Quantity and Market Value of HIL Materials in Vapor-Deposited Small-Molecule OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-24: Quantity and Market Value of HIL Materials1 in Solution-Processed Small-Molecule OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-25: Quantity and Market Value of HIL Materials in Polymer OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-26: Summary of HIL Materials in OLED Lighting 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-27: Summary of Hole Injection Layer Materials in OLED Lighting by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-28 Anode1 Area and Value in OLED Lighting Panels by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-29: Encapsulation1 Area and Value in OLED Lighting Panels by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-30: Rigid Glass Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-31: Flexible Glass Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-32: Plastic Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-33: Metal Foil Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-34: Summary of Substrate Area and Value in OLED Lighting Panels 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-35: Summary of Area and Market Value of Substrates in OLED Lighting by Substrate Type 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-36: Summary of Substrates in OLED Lighting by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-37: Comparison of Market Value of Core Functional OLED Lighting Materials in OLED Lighting Panels Fabricated with Vapor-Deposition vs. Solution-Processing1 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-38: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of OLED Lighting Materials 2012-2019  
    Exhibit 3-39: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of OLED Lighting Materials by Material Category 2012-2019 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-40: Grand Total Summary: Market Value of OLED Lighting Materials by Application 2012-2019 ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-571 PUBLISHED October 04, 2012
Advanced Glazing Systems Markets—2012
CATEGORIES :
  • Glass and Glazing
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    According to building engineers, backed up by the evidence of infrared photography, the vast majority of energy loss in buildings is through windows.  In an era of rising real energy prices and uncertainties about future energy supply NanoMarkets believes that a fast growing market for advanced glazing systems can be expected and that this will create profitable business opportunities for a wide variety of companies.  In this new report, NanoMarkets has identified where these opportunities can be found and how much they will be worth.  The report covers the full range of high-performance windows systems that provide thermal, visual and IR management using the latest materials:

    • In this report, firms in the windows/glazing industry will find a comprehensive product roadmap for advanced glazing systems showing how windows products will evolve from the latest generation of highly insulated windows, through the incorporation of various dynamic glass (aka smart windows) technologies, and then on to systems with embedded solar and lighting functionality.  Included in the analysis in this report is an examination of some of the high performance insulated windows and dynamic glass windows products that are already on the market

    • Because of the huge potential addressable market for high-tech windows and the fact that they are likely to use novel materials, this report also includes a comprehensive discussion and forecast of how materials needs will change in the glazing systems market over the next eight years and how materials and chemical firms can benefit from these changes.  Among the materials covered will be smart materials, photoactive materials, glasses, plastics, framing materials, sealants, gasses, desiccants, etc.

    • NanoMarkets also believes that this report will also be of considerable interest to both the solar panel industry and the solid-state lighting industry.  Firms active in these industries will learn from this report how they can tap into the expected rapid growth of advanced glazing systems.  In particular, we show how new opportunities will emerge for building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) companies and OLED firms to make money  by implanting PV and lighting layers into high-performance windows products

    This report will also bring considerable insights to corporate planners throughout the building products and construction industries as well as architects and sophisticated investors.  As with all NanoMarkets reports, this report contains detailed eight-year forecasts of the markets analyzed in this report in both value ($ millions) and volume (area) terms.  Forecast breakouts are by end-user type, technology, materials used and geography.  In addition, the report contains a thorough analysis of the product/market strategies of the leading firms currently active in the advanced glazing space.  And both giant firms – such as Alcoa, Saint-Gobain and Bayer – and the latest startups are included in the coverage.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Summary of Key Drivers for Advanced Glazing Systems
    E.1.1 How New Forces Are Shaping the Advanced Glazing Industry
    E.2 Product Strategies for Advanced Glazing Systems
    E.2.1 Highly Insulated IGUs as a Product Strategy: The Next-Generation Double Glazed Window
    E.2.2 Advanced Glazing Systems as a Product Strategy:  Smart Windows/Dynamic Glazing as Advanced Glazing Systems
    E.2.3  The Coming Together of Advanced Glazing Systems with Solar Panels and Lighting
    E.3 Firms to Watch in the Advanced Glazing Sector
    E.3.1 Innovative Firms to Watch
    E.3.2 Influential Glass Firms and Other Multinationals
    E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Why Double Glazing Isn't Boring Anymore
    1.1.2 On Demand, Technology and Advanced Glazing Systems
    1.1.3 Who Will Profit from Advanced Glazing Systems Market
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology and Information Sources
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Advanced Glazing System Products and Technologies
    2.1  Next-Generation Thermally Insulated Windows
    2.1.1 Emerging Opportunities for Next-Generation Insulated Windows Systems in the Context of the Traditional Double Glazing Industry
    2.1.2 Possibilities for Supply Chain Innovation for Highly Insulated Advanced Glazing Systems
    2.1.3 The "Death" of Plastics and the Future of Highly-Insulated Advanced Glazing Systems
    2.1.4 Trends in Gases in Highly Insulated Windows
    2.1.5 Specialist Glasses and Coatings
    2.1.6 Other Possibilities for Innovations in IGUs
    2.2 Dynamic Glazing Technologies
    2.2.1 Drivers for Dynamic Glazing Technologies
    2.2.2 Available Technologies for Dynamic Glazing: Passive Technologies
    2.2.3 Available Technologies for Dynamic Glazing: Active Technologies
    2.3 Future Integration Directions for Advanced Glazing Systems
    2.3.1 Impact of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) on Smart Glazing Systems
    2.3.2 Integrating Smart Lighting into Advanced Glazing Systems
    2.4 Key Points from this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Markets and Market Forecasts for Advanced Glazing Systems
    3.1 Two Addressable Markets for Advanced Glazing Systems:  Conventional Building Markets and Green Buildings
    3.1.1 Advanced Glazing Systems in "Green" and Zero-Energy Buildings
    3.1.2 Factors Driving Advanced Glazing Systems in Conventional Building Markets
    3.2 Forecasting Assumptions Used in this Report
    3.2.1 Macroeconomic and Regulatory Assumptions
    3.2.2 Sources of Information
    3.2.3 Assumptions About Pricing and Units of Measurement
    3.2.4 Alternative Scenarios
    3.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Advanced Glazing Systems by Technology
    3.3.1  Next-Generation Thermally Insulated Windows
    3.3.2 Dynamic Glazing Technologies
    3.3.3 Multi-Functional Advanced Glazing Systems
    3.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Advanced Glazing Systems for Commercial Buildings
    3.4.1 Market Factors Shaping the Commercial Building Market for Advanced Glazing Systems
    3.4.2 A Note on Market Opportunities for Advanced Glazing Systems for Institutional and Government Buildings
    3.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Advanced Glazing Systems for Industrial Buildings
    3.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Advanced Glazing Systems for Multi-Tenant Residential Buildings
    3.7 Eight-Year Forecasts of Advanced Glazing Systems for Single-Family Residential Buildings
    3.8 Eight-Year Forecasts by Geographical Region
    3.8.1 U.S. Market Outlook for Advanced Glazing Systems
    3.8.2 European Market Outlook for Advanced Glazing Systems
    3.8.3 Asian Market Outlook for Advanced Glazing Systems
    3.8.4 Latin America Market Outlook for Advanced Glazing Systems:  Brazil in Particular
    3.9 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Advanced Glazing System Markets
    3.10 Eight-Year Forecasts of Materials for Advanced Glazing Systems
    3.11 Key Points from this Chapter
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author
     
    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit E-1:  New Forces Shaping the Advanced Glazing Industry
    Exhibit E-2:  Product/Market Evolution of the Advanced Glazing Systems and Markets
    Exhibit E-3: Key Players in the  Dynamic Glazing Market
    Exhibit E-4:  Advanced Glazing Markets by Type of Advanced Glazing Product ($ Million)
    Exhibit 1-1:  Opportunities Available to Major Players in the Advanced Glazing Systems
    Exhibit 2-1:  History and Future Evolution of Highly Insulated Windows
    Exhibit 2-2: Likely End-Use Applications by Dynamic Glazing Technology
    Exhibit 2-3: Regional Demand for Dynamic Glazing by Technology
    Exhibit 2-4:  Firms Pursuing the Market for Electrochromic Displays in the Advanced Glazing Systems Market
    Exhibit 3-1:  Green Building-Related Drivers for Advanced Glazing Markets
    Exhibit 3-2:  Total Worldwide Advanced Glazing  Purchases for Buildings (Million Square Meters)
    Exhibit 3-3:  Total Worldwide Advanced Glazing  Purchases for Buildings ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-4:  Worldwide Next-Generation IGU Penetration of Market
    Exhibit 3-5: Volume of  the Architectural Passive Dynamic Glass Market (Million Square Meters)
    Exhibit 3-6: Value of the Architectural Passive Dynamic Glass Market ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-7: Volume of  the Architectural Active Dynamic Glass Market (Million Square Meters)
    Exhibit 3-8: Value of the Architectural Active Dynamic Glass Market ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-9: Volume of  Multi-Functional Advanced Glazing Systems Market (Million Square Meters)
    Exhibit 3-10: Value of Multi-Functional Advanced Glazing Systems Market  ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-11:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Commercial Buildings (Million Square Meters)
    Exhibit 3-12:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Commercial Buildings ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-13:  Shares of Advanced Glazing Technology Purchases Made by Commercial Buildings (Percent of Total Area)
    Exhibit 3-14:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Industrial Buildings (Million Square Meters)
    Exhibit 3-15:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Industrial Buildings ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-16:  Shares of Advanced Glazing Technology Purchases Made by Industrial Buildings (Percent)
    Exhibit 3-17:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Multi-Tenant Residential Buildings (Millions Square Meters)
    Exhibit 3-18:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Multi-Tenant Residential Buildings ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-19:  Shares of Advanced Glazing Technology Purchases Made by Multi-Tenant Residential Buildings (Percent)
    Exhibit 3-20:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Single-Family Residential Buildings (Millions Square Meters)
    Exhibit 3-21:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Single-Family Residential Buildings ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-22: Shares of Advanced Glazing Technology Purchases Made by Single-Family Residential Buildings (Percent)
    Exhibit 3-23:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Geographical Region ($Millions)
    Exhibit 3-24:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Type of Buildings (Millions of Square Meters)
    Exhibit 3-25:  Advanced Glazing  Purchases by Type of Buildings ($ Millions)(1)
    Exhibit 3-26:  Advanced Glazing  Material Forecast ($ Millions)
     
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-575 PUBLISHED October 03, 2012
Markets for Inorganic and Organic Thin-Film PV Encapsulation - 2012
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY

    Thin-film, DSC and organic PV are notoriously vulnerable to oxygen and water vapor; much more so than conventional crystalline silicon PV.  NanoMarkets believes that as these newer forms of solar panel technology become ever more pervasive, it is creating a growing opportunity to supply cost-effective encapsulation technology into the PV space. 

    Although, in the not-too-distant past, several firms have tried to exploit similar opportunities without success, NanoMarkets now believes that the time is right for PV encapsulation to lead to significant revenue generation for well-prepared companies and this report is designed to assist a variety of firms in preparing for the PV encapsulation opportunity.

    • Firms that have targeted the PV encapsulation space will learn which of the several novel encapsulation technologies that are now emerging will be success in the PV market and which sectors of the market will be most receptive to them.  In particular, this report examines the implications for encapsulation makers of the rise of flexible PV for BIPV and other applications.  Our analysis here takes into account the differing objectives of key encapsulation firms, which include large multinationals like 3M and Corning to specialty firms such as Tera Barrier Films and Beneq

    • The report also provides guidance to firms providing thin-film, DSC and organic PV, showing how improved encapsulation can be leveraged by such firms to create larger addressable markets.  This discussion of encapsulation-related opportunities for PV suppliers is set in the context of today’s PV industry with its poor margins and technological uncertainties.  The report will also be important to the building products industry, since encapsulation is a key enabling technology for building-integrated PV (BIPV), expected to be the fastest growing sector of the PV industry over the next decade and a diversification opportunity for

    • NanoMarkets also believes this report will also be of considerable interest to the glass industry, since even though rigid and heavy we anticipate that glass will continue to be the most widely used material for encapsulation for PV technology.  In particular, this report we provide guidance on the revenues that glass firms can expect to generate from the non-conventional PV sector.

    In this report NanoMarkets provides eight-year forecasts of PV encapsulation markets in both value ($ millions) and volume (area of material) shipped.  Breakouts are by type of encapsulation technology used and type of PV.  In addition, this report appraises the product/market strategies being adopted by the leading active in thin-film, OPV and DSC encapsulation.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Emerging Opportunities in PV Encapsulation
    E.1.1 Advanced Encapsulation Systems Are Needed
    E.1.2 Pricing Challenges for Advanced Encapsulation Materials
    E.1.3 The Continuing Dominance of Glass Encapsulation for Rigid TFPV
    E.1.4 Flexibility Is Emerging as a Key Enabler
    E.2 Firms to Watch
    E.2.1 Glass Firms – Rigid and Flexible
    E.2.2 Dyad Firms
    E.2.3 ALD Encapsulation Firms
    E.3 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for PV Encapsulation

     

    Chapter One:  Introduction to PV Encapsulation Technologies
    1.1 Background to This Report
    1.1.1 New and Expanded Opportunities in PV Encapsulation
    1.1.2 But Slow Growth in the PV Industry Will Limit Growth Rates in Encapsulation
    1.1.3 Why Cost is So Important in PV
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology of This Report
    1.4 Plan of This Report

    Chapter Two:  Markets for PV Encapsulation Technologies – Designs, Materials, and Suppliers
    2.1 Glass Technologies and PV Encapsulation
    2.1.1 Strengths and Weaknesses of Conventional Glass TFPV Encapsulation Strategies
    2.1.2 The Promise of Flexible Glass for Encapsulation
    2.1.3 Major Suppliers of Glass Encapsulation Products
    2.2 Multilayer Dyad Films and PV Encapsulation
    2.2.1 Market Impact of Dyads – The Single Layer Goal and Reducing the Cost
    2.2.2 Dyad Encapsulation Suppliers
    2.3 Emerging Options for PV Encapsulation
    2.3.1 The Future of ALD for High Performance PV Encapsulation
    2.3.2 Key Players in ALD Encapsulation Technology
    2.4 Key Points Made in This Chapter

    Chapter Three:  Eight-Year Forecasts for Thin-Film and Organic PV Encapsulation Materials
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    3.1.1 Methodology
    3.1.2 Scope of the Forecast
    3.1.3 Data Sources
    3.1.4 Forecasting Assumptions
    3.1.5 Alternative Scenarios
    3.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of TFPV Encapsulation Technologies by Application
    3.2.1 Thin-Film Silicon PV
    3.2.2 CdTe PV
    3.2.3 CIGS PV
    3.2.4 DSC
    3.2.5 OPV
    3.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of TFPV Encapsulation by Product Type
    3.3.1 Rigid Glass and Polymer Films in TFPV Encapsulation
    3.3.2 Flexible Glass
    3.3.3 Multilayer Films
    3.3.4 Conformal Coatings and ALD
    3.4 Summaries of Eight-Year Forecasts of PV Encapsulation
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in This Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Summary Market Value of Encapsulation in PV by Application and by Technology 2012-2019 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Relative sensitivities of different PV technologies
    Exhibit 3-1: Estimated Average Prices of Different Encapsulation Technologies, 2012- 2019 ($/m2)
    Exhibit 3-2: Encapsulation of Thin-Film Silicon PV by Technology 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-3: Encapsulation of CdTe PV by Technology 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-4: Encapsulation in CIGS PV by Technology 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-5: Encapsulation in DSC PV by Technology 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-6: Encapsulation in OPV by Technology 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-7: Rigid Glass/Polymer Film Encapsulation in PV by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-8: Flexible Polymer Film Encapsulation in PV by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-9: Flexible Glass Encapsulation in PV by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-10: Multilayer Barrier Film Encapsulation in PV by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-11: Conformal Coating Encapsulation in PV by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-12: Summary of Encapsulation in PV by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-13: Summary of Encapsulation in PV by Technology 2012-2019

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-573 PUBLISHED October 01, 2012
Markets for OLED Encapsulation Materials 2012 – 2019
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • OLEDs
  • SUMMARY

    This is NanoMarkets' latest report on the commercial development of OLED encapsulation.  The report analyzes the latest technical and market developments in the both OLED encapsulation materials and deposition strategies and it also contains granular eight-year forecasts of the revenues that we expect to be generated from this business, along with quantities of materials  shipped.  These in-depth forecasts are broken out by both product type and application within the OLED space.

    OLED encapsulation sector has changed considerably in the past two years. OLED displays have gone mainstream and OLED lighting is not far behind.  At the same time, novel ways to encapsulate OLEDs – notably Atomic Layer Deposition ALD -- have become available for high throughput production of OLEDs for the first time.  NanoMarkets therefore believes that now is the time for its clients to become better acquainted with opportunities emerging from this important sector:

    • This report will clarify for companies offering the latest encapsulation technologies where they can best find early revenues in the OLED space for their innovative new approaches to encapsulation.  The report also sets out the opportunities for other, more conventional materials firms contemplating entry – or already involved – in the OLED encapsulation sector.

    • OLED display and lighting panel manufacturers will learn from this report, how recent leaps forward in encapsulation technology are enabling new applications for OLEDs, such as televisions and larger lighting panels for the office.  Will encapsulation prove to be the enabler that takes OLEDs into important new addressable markets

    • This report will help the glass industry understand where to make investments in the OLED space.  Despite the recent surge in new encapsulation approaches available to the OLED industry, it is widely understood that for the foreseeable future OLEDs will be mostly encapsulated in glass.  This report identifies what special requirements glass encapsulation must meet to be suitable for the OLED market.  It also analyzes some of the newer glasses that certain firms have recently brought to market, specifically designed for the OLED space along with the prospects for flexible glass in OLED encapsulation.

    In addition to above analysis, this definitive report on the markets for OLED encapsulation also names the winners and losers in this market and examines the product development and marketing strategies of major players in the OLED encapsulation sector, from large multinationals like 3M and Corning to specialty firms like Beneq, UDC, and Tera Barrier Films.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 What Has Changed in OLED Encapsulation in the Last Year
    E.1.1 Encapsulation as a Key Enabler for Large-Area and Flexible OLED Panels
    E.1.2 The Challenge of Pricing and Investment Strategies for Advanced Encapsulation Materials
    E.1.3 Glass Continues to Dominate OLED Encapsulation
    E.1.4 Non-Glass Technologies – Performance vs. Price Tradeoff
    E.2 Firms to Watch in the OLED Encapsulation Space
    E.2.1 Glass and Flexible Glass Firms
    E.2.2 Dyad, Laminate, and ALD Firms to Watch
    E.3 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for OLED Encapsulation

    Chapter One: Introduction to OLED Encapsulation Technologies
    1.1 Background to This Report
    1.1.1 Increased Production and Larger Panel Sizes Lead to New Encapsulation Needs
    1.1.2 New Strategies for Encapsulation
    1.1.3 Opportunities in Glass Encapsulation
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology of This Report
    1.4 Plan of This Report

    Chapter Two: Markets for OLED Encapsulation Technologies – Designs, Materials, and Suppliers
    2.1 OLED Markets and Vulnerabilities
    2.2 Glass Technologies and OLED Encapsulation
    2.2.1 Analysis of Specialized Current and Future OLED Glass Products
    2.2.2 The Promise of Flexible Glass:  Lightweight and High Performance, But When Will the Cost Be Right?
    2.2.3 OLED Glass Suppliers
    2.3 Multilayer Films for OLED Encapsulation
    2.3.1 Dyads: Reducing the Number of Layers
    2.3.2 Multilayer Barrier Films as Laminates or Monolithic Coatings
    2.3.3 Barrier Film Suppliers
    2.4 Prospects for Metal Foil Encapsulation
    2.4.1 Opportunities for the Use of Metal on PMOLED Displays
    2.4.2 Can Metal Foil Encapsulation Find a New Home in Larger-Format OLEDs?
    2.5 Emerging Encapsulation Technologies
    2.5.1 The Future of ALD in OLED Encapsulation – Conformal Coatings
    2.5.2 Special Considerations for Flexible OLEDs
    2.5.3 Suppliers of New(er) Encapsulation Technologies
    2.6 Key Points from This Chapter

    Chapter Three: Eight-Year Forecasts for OLED Encapsulation
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology and Assumptions
    3.1.1 Methodology
    3.1.2 Scope of the Forecast
    3.1.3 Information Sources
    3.1.4 Forecasting Assumptions
    3.1.5 Alternative Scenarios
    3.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Encapsulation Technologies by Addressable Market
    3.2.1 Encapsulation for Small and Medium OLED Displays – Phones, Tablets, Notebooks, Computers, and Related
    3.2.2 Encapsulation for OLED TVs
    3.2.3 Encapsulation for OLED Lighting
    3.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of OLED Encapsulation by Product Type
    3.3.1 Rigid Cover Glass Encapsulation
    3.3.2 Flexible Glass
    3.3.3 Multilayer Barrier Films
    3.3.4 Conformal Coatings
    3.3.5 Metal Foils
    3.4 Summaries of Eight-Year Forecasts of PV Encapsulation
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in This Report

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Summary of OLED Encapsulation Revenues by Application and by Encapsulation Technology 2012-2019 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Important OLED Glass Suppliers 19
    Exhibit 3-1: Estimated Average Prices of Different Encapsulation Technologies 2012- 2019 ($/m2)
    Exhibit 3-2: Analysis of Small and Medium OLED Display Market by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-3: Encapsulation of OLED Displays in Smartphones 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-4: Encapsulation of OLED Displays in Tablets 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-5: Encapsulation of OLED Displays in Notebooks & Related Devices 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-6: Encapsulation of OLED Displays in Monitors 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-7: Encapsulation in Small Passive Matrix OLED Displays 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-8: Summary of Encapsulation in Small & Medium OLED Displays by Technology 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-9: Summary of Encapsulation in Small & Medium OLED Displays by Display Type  2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-10: Encapsulation in the OLED TV Display Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-11: Encapsulation in the OLED Lighting Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-12: Rigid Cover Glass Encapsulation by OLED Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-13: Flexible Glass Encapsulation by OLED Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-14: Multilayer Barrier Film Encapsulation by OLED Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-15: Conformal Coating Encapsulation by OLED Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-16: Metal Foil Encapsulation by OLED Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-17: Summary of OLED Encapsulation by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-18: Summary of OLED Encapsulation by Technology 2012-2019

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-567 PUBLISHED September 05, 2012
Markets for Optically Functional Films and Coatings in Displays – 2012
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    The purpose of this report is to provide a market analysis of the opportunities and challenges for emerging optically functional films used in displays over the next eight years. In this report, we examine the latest products, strategies, and technical developments of the industry.  For example, we identify where new optical film products are likely to help grow addressable markets for different types of displays versus market-dominant LCDs, and where new films for LCDs may help these struggling displays maintain profitability.

    Note that hard coatings and other coatings designed to improve the durability of the displays are also commonly found on the front surface of most displays, but these coatings are not optically functional and so they are excluded from the analysis in this report. (Of course, they must be as optically transparent as possible, but they do not perform a particular optical function.)  In addition, this report also includes NanoMarkets’ assessments of the strategies of leading or influential firms active in the optically functional coating/film space.  And, as always with NanoMarkets reports, this report contains granular, eight-year forecasts of optical films and coatings in volume (by area coated) and value terms, broken out by application.

    End-use display markets covered include LCDs, OLEDs, e-paper displays, and plasma displays, broken out by mobile computing devices (smartphones, tablets, notebooks, etc.), TVs, computer monitors, and others. Optical film/coating products covered include antiglare/antireflection, color/contrast enhancement, privacy films, reflectors, diffusers, prism and brightness enhancement films, reflective polarizers, multifunctional BLU films, and polarizer films.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary:
    E.1 Opportunities for Optical Coatings and Films in the Display Industry
    E.1.1 Films for LCDs Remain the Short-to-Medium Term Opportunity
    E.1.2 Maximizing the Performance of New Displays through Optical Coatings
    E.2 The Optical Films Supply Chain in the Display Industry
    E.2.1 The Dominance of 3M and Japan
    E.2.2 Other Firms to Watch: Korea Ascendant
    E.3 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Optical Films in Display Applications
     
    Chapter One: Introduction

    1.1 Introduction to this Report
    1.1.1 Optical Films and Coatings for the LCD Industry:  Multi-Functional Films and New Functionality
    1.1.2 New Types of Optical Films and Coatings for Non-LCD Displays
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of This Report

    Chapter Two: Optically Functional Coatings and Films in Displays – Designs and Materials
    2.1 Front Surface Display Films
    2.1.1 Antiglare and Antireflection Films
    2.1.2 Color/Contrast Enhancement, Compensation Films, and Privacy Films
    2.1.3 Suppliers of Front Surface Films
    2.2 Polarizers for Displays
    2.2.1 Polarizer Trends and their Market Implications
    2.2.2 Technical Trends and Related Opportunities in the Polarizer Sector
    2.2.3 Suppliers of Polarizers
    2.3 Optically Functional Films in LCD BLUs
    2.3.1 Technical Trends and Market Implications in LCD BLU Films
    2.3.2 Multifunctional and Specialty Film Opportunities
    2.3.3 Suppliers
    2.4 Key Points Made in This Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Eight-Year Forecasts of Optical Films for Displays
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    3.1.1 Methodology
    3.1.2 Scope of the Forecast
    3.1.3 Data Sources
    3.1.4 Assumptions
    3.1.5 Optical Film Prices
    3.1.6 Alternative Scenarios
    3.2 LCDs:  Addressable Market Analysis and Market Forecasts
    3.2.1 Mobile Computing – Phones, Tablets, and Notebooks
    3.2.2 TVs
    3.2.3 Monitors and Related Displays
    3.2.3 All Other LCDs
    3.2.4 Summary of Forecasts of Optically Functional Films in LCDs
    3.3 OLEDs:  Addressable Market Analysis and Market Forecasts
    3.3.1 Mobile Computing – Phones, Tablets, and Notebooks
    3.3.2 OLED TVs
    3.3.3 All Other OLED Displays
    3.3.4 Summary of Forecasts of Optically Functional Films in OLED Displays
    3.4 E-Paper Displays:  Addressable Market Analysis and Market Forecasts
    3.4.1 Consumer Electronics Displays
    3.4.2 All Other e-Paper Displays
    3.4.3 Summary of Forecasts of Optically Functional Films in e-Paper Displays
    3.5 Plasma Displays: Addressable Market Analysis and Market Forecasts
    3.5.1 Analysis of the Plasma Display Market
    3.5.2 Optical Films in Plasma Displays
    3.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Optically Functional Films by Application
    3.6.1 Front Surface Optical Films – Antiglare/Antireflection, Color/Contrast Enhancement, and Privacy Films
    3.6.2 Polarizers
    3.6.3 Prismatic Brightness Enhancement Films
    3.6.4 LCD-Specific Optical Films: Reflectors, Diffusers, Reflective Polarizers, and Multifunctional BLU Films
    3.7 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts
    3.7.1 Summary by Application
    3.7.2 Summary by Film Type
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in This Report

     

    List of Exhibits
    Exhibit E-1: Overview of the Supply Chain for Display Optical Films
    Exhibit E-2: Market Value of Optically Functional Films in Displays by Application and by Film Type 2012-2019 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: Overview of Selected Suppliers of Front Surface Optical Films for Displays
    Exhibit 2-2: Overview of Polarizer Film Production, Key Issues, and Major Japanese Players
    Exhibit 2-3: Typical Backlight Configurations
    Exhibit 2-4: Overview of the Optical Films in the LCD BLU, Key Characteristics, and Major Suppliers
    Exhibit 3-1:  Optically Functional Film/Coating Types Found In Displays
    Exhibit 3-2: Average Optical Film Prices ($/m2) 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-3: Analysis of the LCD Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-4: Analysis of the Total Area of the LCD Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-5: Optically Functional Films in LCDs Used in Mobile Computing Applications 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-6: Optically Functional Films in LCD TVs 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-7: Optically Functional Films in Computer Monitors and Related LCDs 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-8: Optically Functional Films in Other LCDs 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-9: Summary of Optically Functional Films in LCDs 2012-2019 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-10: Analysis of the OLED Display Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-11: Analysis of the Total Area of the OLED Display Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-12: Optically Functional Films in OLEDs Used in Mobile Computing Applications 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-13: Optically Functional Films in OLED TVs 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-14: Optically Functional Films in All Other OLED Displays 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-15: Summary of Optically Functional Films in OLED Displays 2012-2019 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-16: Analysis of the e-Paper Display Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-17: Analysis of the Total Area of the e-Paper Display Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-18: Optically Functional Films in e-Paper Displays Used in Consumer Electronics Applications 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-19: Optically Functional Films in All Other e-Paper Displays 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-20: Summary of Optically Functional Films in e-Paper Displays 2012-2019 ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-21: Analysis of the Plasma Display Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-22: Analysis of the Total Area of the Plasma Display Market 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-23: Optically Functional Films in Plasma Displays 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-24: Antiglare/Antireflection Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-25: Contrast/Color Enhancement Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-26: Privacy Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-27: Front-Surface Optically Functional Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-28: Polarizer Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-29: Prismatic/Brightness Enhancement Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-30: Reflector Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-31: Diffuser Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-32: Reflective Polarizer Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-33: Multifunctional Enhancement Films for BLUs in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-34: Summary of Optically Functional Films in Displays by Application 2012-2019
    Exhibit 3-35: Summary of Optically Functional Films in Displays by Film Type 2012-2019

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-565 PUBLISHED September 04, 2012
BIPV Wall Markets – 2012
CATEGORIES :
  • Renewable Energy
  • SUMMARY

    The goal of this report is to quantify and analyze the market opportunity for BIPV technology in walling markets over the next eight years and it builds on industry analysis that NanoMarkets has carried out in the BIPV and smart windows business over the past few years.  NanoMarkets has been covering the BIPV space now for more than five years and the PV space for several years longer. 

    With regard to the scope of this report, we have included coverage of the use of BIPV in all areas that could broadly be considered walling.  We take this to include primarily curtain walls (and related shading products) and siding products of various kinds.  But we have also focused on  novel technologies in the BIPV space, especially wall-related solar thermal technologies and completely new technologies such as solar-powered wall lights and so-called solar paint. 

    Also, in the technology sphere we have included an analysis of what the various rival types of PV could bring to the BIPV walling market.  Of especial concern in this context is the ability of PV technologies to perform in a shaded environment because walling is always shaded to some extent.  Flexibility also has some importance here.

    With regard to end user markets, those that we discuss most extensively are commercial and industrial buildings, since this is where most of the revenues in the BIPV walling space are likely to be earned in the next eight years.  However, we do include some discussion on residential markets, especially multi-tenant residential buildings which have important business characteristics in common with commercial buildings from the perspective of a BIPV provider.  We have also included a special section on the role of BIPV glass in "prestige buildings," a weakly defined category, but one where BIPV has found its first revenues. 

    We are primarily interested in this report with BIPV products that are based on a fairly high level of integration; that is to say the ”I” in BIPV is given some emphasis in this report.  However, we also acknowledge that much of BIPV today is more like "first-generation" BIPV, or what is now more usually called building-attached PV (BAPV).  In this approach, completely conventional PV panels are disguised by the architecture of a given building and it is this kind of disguise that constituted the "integration." BAPV is still very much alive, which is why we consider it in this report, but contrasts to a high degree with "true" BIPV, where the integration is of a technological rather than an architectural nature.

    Several issues are not the focus of the report.  Specifically, there is a type of solar thermal technology that is integrated into walls.  BIPV has some lessons to be learned from this technology, but solar thermal is, by definition, not BIPV, so we do not discuss it in depth here.  Similarly, this report does not claim to be a primer on either BIPV or PV in general.  It is assumed that the reader of this report already has a good understanding about these technologies.

    This report is worldwide in its scope. However, throughout this report, we discuss the differences among regional and national markets.  It goes almost without saying that much of the BIPV markets are focused on a few geographies; because the PV industry as a whole is so focused. Germany, Japan and California account for most of the entire worldwide market. 

    Other reasons for focusing to some extent on regional or national differences is that regulatory factors and conditions in the construction industry can vary quite a lot from place to place, not to mention taste/architectural factors of importance to the BIPV glass business.  Obviously, space does not allow a full coverage of matters as complex as regulation and national construction markets.  Rather, we try to point out the impact of general trends.

    As with all PV, the economics of including BIPV glass in buildings are better with new construction than with retrofits, we discuss both opportunities in the main body of this report.  We also assess the current strategies of firms already pursuing the BIPV walling market.  And as with all NanoMarkets reports, this report contains granular eight-year forecasts in both MW and dollar terms of BIPV wall markets, with breakouts by end user, type of product and type of PV technology.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary
    E.1 Assessment of New Technology Opportunities in the BIPV Wall Market
    E.1.1 BIPV Walls Today
    E.1.2 Notable Drivers for BIPV Walling Markets
    E.1.3 BIPV Walling Products and Opportunities
    E.2 Assessment of BIPV Walls Markets by Building Type
    E.2.1 Commercial and Industrial Buildings
    E.2.2 Residential Buildings
    E.3 Supply and Value Chain Opportunities and Challenges
    E.3.1 The Role of Architects and Construction Firms in the BIPV Wall  Value Chain
    E.3.2 PV Walls in Existing Supply Chains
    E.4 Firms to Watch in the BIPV Walling Market
    E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts for BIPV Walls

    Chapter One:  Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 Does the BIPV Market Exist?
    1.1.2 BIPV Wall Products:  Today and Tomorrow
    1.1.3 Who is BIPV Walling an Opportunity For?
    1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report

    Chapter Two:  Wall-Related BIPV Technologies and Products
    2.1 The Economics of BIPV Wall Products
    2.1.1 Building Fabric Cost Sharing as a Driver for BIPV Walling
    2.1.2 Adding Value as a Driver for BIPV
    2.2 "Walling-Attached" PV (WAPV)
    2.2.1 WAPV:  Current State of the Art
    2.2.2 WAPV:  Future Trends and Opportunities
    2.3 Opportunities for BIPV Roofing Products in Wall-Related Markets
    2.3.1 BIPV Tiles in Walling Markets
    2.3.2 BIPV Shingles in Walling Markets
    2.4 Dedicated BIPV Siding Technologies
    2.4.1 Relationship Between Siding Functions and BIPV Functions
    2.4.2 Siding and Flexible PV
    2.4.3 Heliatek and RECKLI:  A Concrete BIPV Wall
    2.5 BIPV Curtain Wall Technology
    2.5.1 BISEM's Project at the Sacramento Municipal Utility Commission
    2.5.2 Konarka's Curtain Wall
    2.5.3 Mage Sunovation and Transparent BIPV Plastic
    2.6 Novel Technologies for BIPV Walls
    2.6.1 Integration of BIPV Walls and Solar Lighting
    2.6.2 Solar Paint
    2.6.3 A Note on BIPV in "Solar Walls"
    2.7 Opportunities for PV Panel Makers in the BIPV Wall Market
    2.7.1 Silicon PV Panels and BIPV Walls
    2.7.2 Role of OPV and DSC in BIPV Walls
    2.7.3 CIGS and BIPV Walls
    2.7.4 A Note on CdTe in BIPV Walls
    2.8 Substrates and Encapsulation for BIPV Walls
    2.8.1 Rigid BIPV Encapsulation
    2.8.2 Flexible BIPV Encapsulation
    2.9 Key Points Made in this Chapter

    Chapter Three: Markets and Forecasts for BIPV Walls
    3.1 Forecasting Methodology
    3.1.1 Macroeconomic and Regulatory Assumptions
    3.1.2 Sources of Information
    3.1.3 Assumptions About Pricing and Units of Measurement
    3.1.4 Alternative Scenarios
    3.2 Regulatory and Subsidy Factors Impacting BIPV Walls
    3.2.1  BIPV Walls and Zero-Energy Buildings
    3.2.2 Building Codes, LEED and BIPV Walls
    3.2.2 BIPV Subsidies and BIPV Walls
    3.2 BIPV Walling and the Question of Aesthetics
    3.2.1 Restrictions on Conventional PV
    3.2.2 Aesthetics and WAPV
    3.2.2 Aesthetics Considerations in "True" BIPV Walling
    3.3 End-User Markets by Type of Building
    3.3.1 The Importance of Prestige Buildings for BIPV Markets:  Impact on  BIPV Walls
    3.3.2 BIPV Wall Markets for Commercial and Industrial Buildings
    3.3.3 Residential Buildings:  Multi-tenant, Single Tenant and BIPV Walls
    3.3.4 Retrofit and New Installations for BIPV Walls
    3.4 Forecast of BIPV Roofing's Share of the BIPV and General PV Market
    3.5 Eight-Year Forecasts by Type of Wall and Functionality
    3.5.1 WAPV Walls:  End-User Markets and Type of PV Technology Used
    3.4.2 Roofing BIPV Repurposed for Wall Applications:  End User Markets and Type of PV Technology Used
    3.4.3 BIPV Curtain Walls:  End User Markets and Type of PV Technology Used
    3.4.4 Dedicated BIPV Siding:  End User Markets and Type of PV Technology Used
    3.5 Preliminary Thoughts on the Size of BIPV Wall Markets of the Future:  Solar Paint and Integrated Lighting/Wall Panels
    3.6 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of BIPV Wall Markets
    3.6.1 Breakout by Type of BIPV Wall Product
    3.6.2 Breakout by Type of Building
    3.6.3 Breakout by Type of PV Technology
    3.7 Eight-Year Forecasts of BIPV Walling by Region
    3.8 Key Points Made in this Chapter
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Summary of Available Opportunities and Products for BIPV Walling
    Exhibit E-2: Firms to Watch in the BIPV Walling Space
    Exhibit E-3: BIPV Walling Markets by Type of BIPV Wall Product ($ Million)
    Exhibit 2-1: Advantages and Disadvantages of Major PV Absorber Materials for BIPV Walling
    Exhibit 2-2: CIGS PV Competitors in 2011
    Exhibit 3-1: Common Building Requirements for BIPV
    Exhibit 3-2: Aesthetic Advantages and Disadvantages of BIPV Walling by Type of PV Technology
    Exhibit 3-3: BIPV Walling:  Share of Worldwide PV and BIPV Markets
    Exhibit 3-4: WAPV Wall Shipments by End User
    Exhibit 3-5: WAPV Material Shipments by Type of PV Technology Used ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-6: BIPV Walls Using Repurposed BIPV Roofing Products:  Shipments by End Users
    Exhibit 3-7: BIPV Walls Using Repurposed BIPV Roofing Products: Shipments by Type of PV Technology Used ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-8: BIPV Curtain Walls: Shipments by End Users
    Exhibit 3-9: BIPV Curtain Walls: Shipments by Type of PV Technology Used ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-10: BIPV Siding: Shipments by End Users
    Exhibit 3-11: BIPV Siding Products: Shipments by Type of PV Technology Used ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-12: BIPV Walling Markets by Type of BIPV Wall Product ($ Million)
    Exhibit 3-13: BIPV Walling Markets by Type of Building ($ Million)
    Exhibit 3-14: BIPV Walling Market by Type of PV Technology ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 3-15: BIPV Walling Market by Region ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-559 PUBLISHED August 08, 2012
Transparent Conductor Markets 2012
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • SUMMARY

    NanoMarkets believes that the next few years will be a turning point for the transparent conductor (TC) business.  We foresee opportunities for novel TCs where, for the first time, newer materials have unquestionable market advantages over ITO.  This report provides the necessary strategic insight into how TC firms can best generate new business revenues from the rapidly changing business environment in the display and solar panel sectors. It also provides insight into niche applications such as smart windows, BIPV, etc.

    Manufacturers of alternative TCs have looked toward the day when flexible displays hit the market, since ITO cannot be used in such displays.  That day is now at hand with the first flexible displays from Samsung hitting the market within a year.  In this report, we examine how the revenue opportunities will play out for alternative TC makers in this exciting new application area.

    TC makers can also look to this report for guidance on opportunities in the OLED display and lighting sector.  ITO is not a very effective TC for OLEDs.  In this new report, we show how firms offering TC solutions other than ITO can benefit from the considerable growth expected for OLED industry.

    Other high-growth display markets for TCs are also analyzed in this report.  For example, we see transparent displays as having considerable potential for growth for both signage and augmented reality applications. And we expect transparent displays – almost by definition -- to have special requirements for the TCs that they use.  In fact, the report discusses a broader range of opportunities for TCs in the “transparent electronics” sector such as those in smart windows and BIPV glass.

    In addition, this report examines opportunities for TCs in more established parts of the display sector.  It takes an in depth look at the use of touch-screen technology which is highly suitable for novel TCs.  However, there are so many TC firms crowding into this sector that a legitimate question is whether this relatively small market is about to become saturated.  This is a question that this report answers.  And it also tackles the thorny issue of whether novel TCs can ever displace ITO in the LCD business.

    The comprehensive coverage of this report extends beyond the display sector and includes pinpointing the best prospects for TCs in the solar industry.  Recently, PV opportunities have been constrained by the influx of low-cost c-Si panels from China with limited need for TCs.  In this report, NanoMarkets discusses how the logic of Chinese industrial policy now suggests a revival in the thin-film PV market that will create new opportunities for TCs.

    In this report, Chinese industrial policy is also examined for what it will mean for ITO pricing and availability. Whether indium prices really have an impact on the TC market has been a controversial subject and this report cuts to the chase and shows how the ITO supply chain is really likely to evolve going forward in context of what is planned for the Chinese display, PV and indium industries.

    Finally, this report analyzes important developments on the TC materials front and it takes a peek at what the next generation of transparent conductors will look like and how these materials will extend addressable markets.  This study also contains detailed eight-year forecasts in volume (square meters) and value terms.  For each of the applications covered there are breakouts of demand for ITO, other TCOs, ITO/TCO inks, carbon nanotube films, silver-based transparent conductors, other nanometallic transparent conductors and conductive polymers.  And there is also a forecast of ITO products by type (sputtering targets, films, coated glass, etc.).  Finally, the strategies of the leading TC firms are also assessed in the context of the latest market developments.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Transparent Conductors:  In Need of a Strategic Reboot?
    E.2 Touch-Screen Sensor Markets Reevaluated: Room for Just So Many TC Providers?
    E.3  Flexibility:  A Paradigm Change for the Transparent Conductor Industry?
    E.3.1 Do Flexible Displays Represent a Growth Market for Alternative Transparent Conductors?
    E.4 What the OLED Explosion Means for Transparent Conductor Makers
    E.4.1 Transparent Conductors for the OLED Market Explosion
    E.5 Will the LCD Industry Ever Open Up to Alternative Transparent Conductors?
    E.6 Better Times Ahead for Selling Transparent Conductors into the PV Space
    E.7 Firms and Materials to Watch in the Transparent Conductor Space
    E.7.1 For ITO Suppliers Looking for Something to Worry About
    E.7.2 Silver Linings:  The Rapid Rise of Silver and Metal Meshes
    E.7.3 Still Hope for Carbon Nanotubes?
    E.7.4 TCs of the Future:  The "Fourth Generation"
    E.8 Summary of Eight-Year Market Forecasts For Transparent Conductor Markets
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to this Report
    1.1.1 The Year 2012 Will Be A Quiet One for the ITO Alternative Business
    1.1.2 The Arguments Against ITO Should Be Reconsidered
    1.1.3 A Better Case for Alternatives to ITO in 2012 and Beyond
    1.1.4 OLEDs, Flexibility and the Transformation of the End-User Market for Alternative Transparent Conductors in 2013
    1.1.5 The Next Generation of Transparent Conductors:  Coming Soon?
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of this Report
     
    Chapter Two: Transparent Conductors—New Technology and Market Developments
    2.1 Developments in the ITO Market
    2.1.1 Status and Evolution of the ITO Supply Chain and ITO Technology
    2.1.2 The ITO Business:  Major Players
    2.1.3 Traditional Film Deposition Methods and Parameters
    2.2 Printed ITO, Sol-Gel, and Other Manufacturing Innovations
    2.2.1 ITO Inks:  Perhaps a Brighter Future?
    2.3 ITO Film Markets
    2.4 Indium and the China Factor
    2.4.1 Indium Production Trends
    2.4.2 Recent Changes in Chinese Government Policy and its Impact on the Indium Market
    2.4.3 Do Indium Prices Really Matter to the ITO Market?
    2.4.4 How Market Uncertainties Will Shape the ITO Markets:  A Final Word on China
    2.4.5 Recycling, Reclamation and Improved Processing of ITO
    2.5 Other Transparent Conducting Oxides:  Past Failures But Future Successes?
    2.5.1 Tin Oxide and its Variants
    2.5.2 Zinc Oxide and its Variants
    2.5.3 More TCOs for the Future?
    2.5.4 Are Other TCOs Really a Drop-In Replacement?
    2.2.5 Why Would PV Ever Leave TCOs?
    2.6 Silver Grids, Coatings and Inks:  Onwards and Upwards
    2.6.1 Silver and Other Metallic Coatings
    2.6.2 Silver Grids Large and Small
    2.6.3 Cambrios and the Others:  Nanosilver and Value-Added
    2.7 Are there Opportunities for Copper in the Transparent Conductor Market?
    2.8 Carbon Nanotubes:  Slow to Emerge but Could They Win in the End?
    2.8.1 The Advantages and Disadvantages of Carbon Nanotubes for  Transparent Conductors
    2.8.2 Limiting the Carbon Nanotube: Making Them "Just Conductors"
    2.8.3 Derivatization of Carbon Nanotubes
    2.8.4 Carbon Nanotube Transparent Conductors and Suppliers
    2.8.5 A Coda on the Future of Carbon Nanotube-Based Transparent Conductors
    2.9 The Latest on Where Graphene Stands as a Transparent Conductor
    2.10 Conductive Polymers as Transparent Conductors
    2.10.1 Transparent Conductive Polymers: How Far Can Performance be Pushed?
    2.10.2 Cost Trends for PEDOT:PSS
    2.10.3 PEDOT Suppliers for Transparent Conductor Applications
    2.10.4 Possible Technology Developments in Conductive Polymers
    2.11 Other Developments:  Fourth-Generation Transparent Conductors
    2.12 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Forecasting Methodology and Assumptions for Markets Analyzed in this Report
    3.1 Market Segments Covered in this Report:  Differences from Previous NanoMarkets Reports
    3.1.1 Adding Coverage of Transparent Conductors for Flexible and Transparent Electronics
    3.1.2 Other Coverage-Related Factors and Reconsideration of Likely Penetration by non-ITO Transparent Conductors
    3.2 Forecasting Methodology and Assumptions
    3.2.1 Materials Covered in the Forecast
    3.2.2 Assumptions About Materials Utilization, Wastage and Yields
    3.2.3 Cost Assumptions
    3.2.4 General Economic Assumptions
    3.2.5 Sources of Data
     
    Chapter Four: Display- and Lighting-Related Markets for Transparent Conductors:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    4.1 Conventional Liquid Crystal Displays: Stuck On ITO?
    4.1.1 Continued Limiting Factors on the Use of Novel Transparent Conductors
    4.1.2 How and When non-ITO Transparent Conductor Firms Will Break into the LCD Market
    4.1.3 Strategies for non-ITO Transparent Conductor Firms in the LCD Market
    4.1.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the Flat-Panel Display Industry
    4.1.5 Notes on Transparent Conductors in Plasma Displays
    4.1.6 A Note on the Impact of Transparent Displays on the Transparent Conductor Market
    4.2 Touch Screens:  Why Transparent Conductor Firms Love Them
    4.2.1 Why the Touch-Screen Sector Has Become So Important to Suppliers of Transparent Conductors
    4.2.2 Changes in the Transparent Conductor Customer Base in the Touch-Screen Sensor Industry
    4.2.3 Projected-Capacitive Touch Sensors as a Market for Transparent Conductors
    4.2.4 The Analog-Resistive Touch Sensors as a Market for Transparent Conductors
    4.2.5 Other Touch-Related Opportunities for Transparent Conductors
    4.2.6 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the Touch-Screen Sensor Industry
    4.3 Flexible Electronics Mythologies and Realities: Their Impact on the Transparent Conductor Market
    4.3.1 Flexible Displays:  Technology Constraints and Transparent Conductor Choice
    4.3.2 Types of Flexible Displays and Likely Market Acceptance:  Implications for Transparent Conductors
    4.3.3 Transparent Conductors for Roll-to-Roll Processing
    4.4 Transparent Conductors for the New OLED Market
    4.4.1 The OLED Industry Leaps Forward
    4.4.2 Unique Advantages of OLEDs
    4.4.3 How OLEDs Potentially Shrink the TC Market
    4.4.4 The Quest to Get Rid of ITO in OLEDs
    4.4.5 Transparent Conductors in Active Matrix OLED Displays
    4.4.6 OLED Lighting Markets for Transparent Conductors
    4.4.7 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the OLED Display and Lighting Market
    4.5 E-Paper and Transparent Conductors:  A Niche Market for the Alternative Transparent Conductor Business
    4.5.1 Varieties of E-Paper Displays and their TC Requirements
    4.5.2 Shifts from ITO in the E-Paper Space
    4.5.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the E-Paper Display and Lighting Market
    4.6 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Five:  Solar Panel Markets for Transparent Conductors:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    5.1 Thin-Film Photovoltaics: Where ITO has Already Met Its Match
    5.1.1 The Coming Renaissance for Thin-Film PV:  Implications for the Transparent Conductor Business
    5.1.2 Transparent Conductor Usage for the Thin-Film Silicon PV Sector
    5.1.3 CdTe PV:  Long-Term Changes in Transparent Conductor Usage
    5.1.4 CIGS PV:  A New Hope for Transparent Conductor Usage
    5.1.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the Thin-Film  PV Market
    5.2 Organic PV and Dye Sensitized Cells: A Worthwhile Market for Transparent Conductor Suppliers
    5.2.1 DSC and Transparent Conductors
    5.2.2 Organic PV and Transparent Conductors
    5.2.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductors in the OPV/DSC Market
    5.3 BIPV and Transparent Conductors
    5.4 Transparent Conductors and Flexible PV
    5.5 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Six:  Windows and Other Markets for Transparent Conductors:  Eight-Year Forecasts
    6.1 The Importance of Other Markets for Transparent Conductors
    6.2 IR and UV Protection Opportunities for Transparent Conductors
    6.3 Antistatic Applications for Transparent Conductors
    6.3.1 Antistatic Markets in the Building Products Industry
    6.3.2 ESD Applications for the Electronics Market
    6.3.3 Tin Oxide as an Antistatic Coating
    6.3.4 Zinc Oxide as an Antistatic Coating
    6.3.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Transparent Conductors for Antistatic Coatings
    6.4  Transparent Conductors in EMI/RFI Shielding
    6.4.1 Eight-Year Forecast of Transparent Conductors for EMI Shielding
    6.5 Smart Windows Applications for Transparent Conductors
    6.5.1 Low-E Windows
    6.5.2 Solar Control Films
    6.5.3 Electrochromic (EC) and Suspended Particle Device (SPD) Technologies
    6.5.4 PDLC Active On-Demand Smart Windows
    6.5.5 Thermochromic Smart Glass
    6.5.6 Self-Cleaning Windows
    6.5.7 Eight-Year Forecast of Transparent Conductors for Smart Windows
    6.6 Yet Other Markets for Transparent Conductors
    6.7 Key Points Made in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Seven:  Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductor Markets
    7.1 Eight-Year Forecasts of ITO and Other Transparent Conductors by  Material Type
    7.1.1 Eight-Year Forecast of ITO Markets
    7.7.2 Eight-Year Forecast of non-ITO TCO Markets
    7.7.3 Eight-Year Forecast of ITO/TCO Ink Markets
    7.7.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Carbon Nanotube-based Transparent Conductor Markets
    7.7.5 Eight-Year Forecast of Silver-based Transparent Conductors Film Markets
    7.7.6 Eight-Year Forecast of Other Metallic Transparent Conductor Markets
    7.7.7 Eight-Year Forecast of Transparent Conductive Polymer Markets
    7.7.8 Eight-Year Forecast of Other Transparent Conductor Materials Markets
    7.8 Summary of Market Forecasts by Material and Application Type
    7.8.1 Summary by Type of Material
    7.8.2 Summary by Applications
    7.9 Summary of ITO Forecasts by Type of ITO Product: Targets, Film and  Coated Glass
    7.10 Final Thoughts on Alternative Scenarios for Transparent Conductor Materials
     
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Author

     

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Addressable Markets for non-ITO Transparent Conductors
    Exhibit E-2: Potential Opportunities for non-ITO Transparent Conductors in the Flexible Display Market
    Exhibit E-3: Long-Term Issues that ITO Faces in the OLED Market
    Exhibit E-4: PV Trends and their Impact on the Transparent Conductor Market
    Exhibit E-5: Transparency of Transparent Conductive Material Types
    Exhibit E-6: Sheet Resistance of Transparent Conductive Material Types
    Exhibit E-7: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductive Materials by Material Type ($ Millions)
    Exhibit E-8: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductive Materials by Application ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 2-1: ITO Products in Current Use
    Exhibit 2-2: Refinery Production of Indium
    Exhibit 2-3: Selected Major Indium Firms in China
    Exhibit 2-4: Indium Price and Production Trends (Values in Metric Tons Unless Noted)
    Exhibit 2-5: ITO in the Display BOM:  A Thought Experiment ($, except final line)
    Exhibit 2-6: Markets for FTO Coated Functional Glass by Utilization
    Exhibit 2-7: Selected Projects and Collaborations in the CNT TC Space
    Exhibit 2-8: Agfa's Conductive ORGACON Coatings
    Exhibit 2-9: Heraeus' Clevios Material Properties
    Exhibit 2-10: PEDOS Properties
    Exhibit 3-1: NanoMarkets' Perspective and Expectations of Penetration of Selected Transparent Conductor Materials
    Exhibit 3-2: Cost of Transparent Conductive Material Types: NanoMarkets' Estimates for 2012
    Exhibit 4-1: Important Requirements for Transparent Conductors Used for LCD Displays
    Exhibit 4-2: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand in Flat-Panel Displays (LCD and PDP)
    Exhibit 4-3: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in Flat-Panel Displays
    Exhibit 4-4: Important Parameters for Transparent Conductors Used for Plasma Displays
    Exhibit 4-5: A Provisional Roadmap for Transparent Electronics
    Exhibit 4-6: Important Parameters for Transparent Conductors Used for Touch-Screen Sensors
    Exhibit 4-7: Why the Touch Sensor Business is Attractive for Transparent Conductor Makers
    Exhibit 4-8: Touch-Screen Technologies by Size and Multi-Touch Functionality
    Exhibit 4-9: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Requirements in Touch-Screen  Display Sensors
    Exhibit 4-10: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in Touch-Screen Display Sensors
    Exhibit 4-11: Flexibility of Transparent Conductive Material Types
    Exhibit 4-12: Selected Flexible Display Frontplane Technologies
    Exhibit 4-13: Important Parameters for Transparent Conductors Used for OLED Display Electrodes
    Exhibit 4-14: Important Requirements for Transparent Conductors Used for OLED Lighting Electrodes
    Exhibit 4-15: OLED Lighting Manufacturing Facilities by Selected Companies 135
    Exhibit 4-16: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Requirements in OLED Displays (Excludes OLED Lighting)
    Exhibit 4-17: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Requirements in OLED Displays (Excludes OLED Lighting)
    Exhibit 4-18: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Requirements in OLED Lighting
    Exhibit 4-19: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in OLED Lighting
    Exhibit 4-20: Important R for Transparent Conductors Used for EPDs
    Exhibit 4-21: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Demand in E-Paper Displays
    Exhibit 4-22: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in E-Paper Displays
    Exhibit 5-1: A Profile of the Thin-Film PV Industry Considered by Type of Absorber Layer
    Exhibit 5-2: Important Parameters for Transparent Conductors Used for PV Electrodes
    Exhibit 5-3: CIGS PV Competitors in 2011
    Exhibit 5-4: Known TCOs In Commercial CIGS/CIS
    Exhibit 5-5: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Requirements in Thin-Film and Organic Photovoltaics
    Exhibit 5-6: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in Thin-Film and Organic PV
    Exhibit 5-7: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials Requirements in OPV/DSC
    Exhibit 5-8: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in OPV/DSC
    Exhibit 6-1: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in Antistatic Coatings
    Exhibit 6-2: Forecast of Transparent Conductive Materials by Type in Electromagnetic Shielding
    Exhibit 6-3: Total High Quality Float Glass Market for Thermochromic, Photochromic Low-E Windows (Millions of m2)
    Exhibit 7-1: Summary of Forecast of ITO by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 7-2: Summary of Forecast of Non-ITO TCOs by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 7-3: Summary of Forecast of ITO and TCO Inks by Application  ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 7-4: Summary of Forecast of Carbon Nanotube Films by Application  ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 7-5: Summary of Forecast of  Silver Films and Grids by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 7-6: Summary of Forecast of Other Metallic Films by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 7-7: Summary of Forecast of Transparent Conductive Polymers by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 7-8: Summary of Forecast of Other TCs by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 7-9: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Transparent Conductive Materials
    Exhibit 7-10: Summary of Forecasts of  TC Market by Application ($ Millions, except for final line)
    Exhibit 7-11: ITO Market by End User Product/Process  ($ Millions)

PURCHASE OPTIONS
Basic (1-2 users) $1,995.00  
Advanced (Up to 10 users) $2,495.00  
Corporate (unlimited) $2,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-557 PUBLISHED August 07, 2012
OTFTs, OFETs and Organic Memory Markets– 2012
CATEGORIES :
  • Advanced Materials
  • Emerging Electronics
  • SUMMARY

    Improved materials and new applications have brought a renaissance of interest in the commercialization of transistors and memories built from organic materials.  This NanoMarkets report provides an analysis and forecast of the OTFT/OFET and organic memory markets over the next eight years.

    In this report, we identify where the genuine performance improvements in these devices are occurring and how fast they can be expected to grow in process power and storage in the future.  This analysis is provided through an in-depth assessment of current commercialization efforts for OTFT/OFETs, memories and related organic “chips.”

    This study also provides a complete exploration of the markets in which OTFT/OFETs and organic memories can be expected to generate new business revenues.  These include a rapidly growing list of low-performance electronics applications such as smart packaging, interactive media and tagging.  We also discuss, whether – as was once expected of OTFT/OFETs -- these devices will serve as a key enabling technology for flexible displays.

    This report contains a detailed eight-year volume and value forecast of shipments of products with organic “chips” inside.  It also includes an eight-year forecast of the materials required for next generation organic transistors and memories.  Finally, this report includes NanoMarkets’ assessments of the strategies of key firms and research institutions active in this area.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Taking Organic/Printed Logic and Memory Seriously: Lessons from the Success of the OLED Industry
    E.1.1 Increased Activity and Renewed Optimism
    E.1.2 How the Success of OLEDs May Help Organic Logic and Memory
    E.2 Key Opportunities for Organic Logic and Memory
    E.2.1 Low-Performance Electronics Applications
    E.2.2 Organic Backplane Applications
    E.3 Materials Needs for Organic Logic and Memory
    E.3.1 Expanded Markets Through Higher Mobility Semiconductors
    E.3.2 And…It All Has to Be Solution-Processable
    E.4 Players to Watch: Pioneers and What’s Next
    E.4.1 Materials Suppliers
    E.4.2 Logic and Memory Firms
    E.4.3 Display Manufacturers to Watch
    E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for Organic/Printed Logic and Memory
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to This Report
    1.1.1 A Changing Landscape—Finally
    1.1.2 But…Success is Far from Certain
    1.2 Objectives and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology of this Report
    1.4 Plan of This Report
     
    Chapter Two: Organic Transistors and Memories:  Devices and Materials
    2.1 Industry Trends
    2.1.1 Industry Cooperation
    2.1.2 OTFT/OFET Mobility Trends
    2.1.3 Trends in Polymer/Organic Memory
    2.2 Critical Materials Developments Enabling Maximum Performance at Low Cost
    2.2.1 Materials Choices
    2.2.2 Organic “CMOS”:  Now a Real Possibility
    2.2.3 The Promise of Room Temperature Solution Processing and Printing
    2.2.4 Ink and Coating Formulations Suitable for Manufacturing
    2.2.5 The Link Between Solution Processability and Thermal Stability
    2.2.6 Encapsulation Matters
    2.3 Commercialization Patterns for Organic Transistors and Memories
    2.4 Key Points Made in this chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Applications and Eight-Year Forecasts of OTFT/OFETs and Organic Memories
    3.1 Key Drivers for the Printed/Organic Device Markets
    3.1.1 Drivers for Printed/Organic Logic and Memory
    3.1.2 Technology is Still Important
    3.2 Forecasting Methodology and Assumptions
    3.2.1 Methodology and Information Sources
    3.2.2 Factors Influencing the Rate of Commercialization of OTFT/OFET and Organic Memory
    3.2.3 Device Performance and the Link to Addressable Market Size
    3.2.4 Economic Assumptions
    3.2.5 Pricing Assumptions
    3.3 Smart Packaging Markets: Eight-Year Forecasts of OTFTs/OFETs and Organic Memory
    3.3.1 Food and Personal Care Smart Packaging Applications
    3.3.2 Pharmaceutical and Healthcare-Related Smart Packaging
    3.3.3 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for OTFTs/OFET and Organic Memory in Smart Packaging
    3.4 Brand Image and Security Applications:  Eight-Year Forecasts of OTFTs/OFETs and Organic Memory
    3.5 Distribution Tagging:  Eight-Year Forecasts of OTFTs/OFETs and Organic Memory
    3.6 Smartcards:  Eight-Year Forecasts of OTFTs/OFETs and Organic Memory
    3.7 Interactiv