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REPORT # Nano-029 PUBLISHED September 13, 2007
Printed and Organic Sensor Markets: 2007-2015
CATEGORIES :
  • Emerging Electronics
  • SUMMARY

    The emergence of printed and organic electronics as an industry holds considerable promise for the sensor sector. Printing can help bring down costs of sensors and may also be the ideal way for creating multi-layered sensor products such as "electronic noses." The introduction of new organic materials increases the choices for sensor manufacturers. Finally, the ability of printed electronics to create large arrays of sensors on flexible substrates opens up possibilities for entirely new products such as sensors for biohazard detection, wearable computing or robotics. Nonetheless, printed and organic sensors are just beginning their commercial evolution.

    This NanoMarkets report analyzes the printed and organic sensor markets to show where such sensors can make their biggest contribution. As part of this analysis, the report assesses appropriate production technologies, system architectures and communications interfaces, as well as performance requirements and achievements for printed and organic sensors (switching speeds, sensitivity, flexibility, etc.) It also discusses important product types such as electronic noses, labs-on-a-chip, biochips and smart dust, for which organic materials and printing may make a considerable contribution.

    Applications of printed and organic sensors covered in the report include smart packaging, smart textiles and uniforms, medical diagnostics, genomics and proteomics, large area sensing for security apps, water and other environmental testing, robotics and smart skins. Eight-year forecasts are provided for printed and organic sensors in each of these applications. The report also provides market projections by type of sensors, e.g. gas sensors, temperature sensors, motion sensors biosensors, etc., along with an analysis of current activities of both commercial firms and major research groups at universities and research institutes.

    Key findings of the report include:

     

    • Environmental monitoring needs accurate and inexpensive long-term monitoring of environmental contaminants. Biosensors created with printed electrodes or organic transistors could offer an inexpensive solution and electronic noses using conductive polymers could provide real-time identification of contaminants. By 2015, environmental monitoring will be the largest single segment of the printed and organic sensor market at $925 million

       

    • Genetic testing, forensics, pharmaceutical manufacture and a broad range of academic disciplines have exploded following the completion of the Humane Genome Project. As a result there is a surging demand for microarrays and biochips, which are expected to reach $413 million by 2015. Agilent is already inkjet printing all of its microarrays.

       

    • The lowered costs associated with printing and organic electronics is also accelerating the trend towards replacing expensive centralized diagnostic equipment with lower cost point-of-care and home testing. Biosensors are a major part of the trend as are printed touch sensors which can be used to diagnose muscular and bone diseases. By 2015 the printed/organic medical diagnostic and therapeutic sensor market (microarrays and biochips excluded) will reach $414 million.

       

    • Smart textiles offer considerable potential for sensors. Applications include garments that adapt to changing temperature and body suits that monitor human physiological state and communicate to a central system. Smart fabrics would better allow the military to communicate, respond to emergencies and achieve informational and situational awareness advantages. The value of printed and organic sensors used in smart textiles is expected to reach $226 million by 2015.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Executive Summary

      E.1 Key Opportunities in the Organic and Printed Sensor Market: Devices
      E.1.1 Medical Diagnostics
      E.1.2 Genomics and Proteomics
      E.1.3 Environmental Monitoring
      E.1.4 Homeland Security
      E.1.5 Smart Packaging
      E.1.6 Smart Textiles
      E.1.7 Pervasive Computing
      E.1.8 Robotics
      E.2 Key Opportunities in the Organic and Printed Sensor Market: Materials
      E.2.1 Trends and Opportunities in Sensor Printing Technology
      E.2.2 Trends and Opportunities in Sensor Inks and Other Materials
      E.3 Firms to Watch
      E.4 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of Printed and Organic Sensors

     

    Chapter One: Introduction

      1.1 Background to Report
      1.1.1 Printed and Organic Sensors as Disruptive Technology
      1.2 Objectives and Scope of this Report
      1.3 Methodology of this Report
      1.4 Plan of this Report

     

    Chapter Two: Technology and Product Trends

      2.1 Introduction
      2.1.1 Making the Business Case for Organic and Printable Electronics in the Sensing Industry
      2.1.2 What Sensors Mean to the Organic and Printable Electronics Industry
      2.2 Materials Platforms for Printed and Organic Electronics
      2.2.1 Metals and Other Conductors for Organic and Printable Sensors
      2.2.2 Semiconductors for Printable and Organic Sensors
      2.2.3 Flexible Substrates for Organic and Printable Sensors
      2.3 Advantages to Printing Sensors and Types of Printing Used
      2.3.1 Jetted Sensors
      2.3.2 Screen Printed Sensors
      2.3.3 Traditional Printing Technologies
      2.4 Types of Printed and Organic Sensors Developed to Date
      2.5 Mechanical Sensors: Strain and Tactile
      2.5.1 Tekscan
      2.5.2 University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
      2.5.3 University of Tokyo
      2.6 Biosensors and Genosensors
      2.6.1 EcoBioServices
      2.6.2 University of Florence
      2.7 Chemical Sensors
      2.7.1 Carnegie Mellon University
      2.8 Optical Sensors
      2.8.1 NanoIdent
      2.9 Moisture Sensors
      2.9.1 Sensible Solutions
      2.10 Electronic Noses and Tongues
      2.10.1 NASA
      2.10.2 Universities of Warwick and Southampton
      2.11 Smart Skins
      2.11.1 University of Illinois
      2.11.2 University of Tokyo
      2.12 Labs-on-a-Chip, Biochips and Microarrays
      2.12.1 Labs-on-a-Chip
      2.12.2 Biochips and Microarrays
      2.12.3 Acrongenomics
      2.12.4 Agilent
      2.12.5 BioIdent
      2.13 Smart Dust and Sensor Arrays
      2.13.1 NanoIdent
      2.13.2 Tekscan
      2.14 Interface Technology for Organic and Printed Sensors
      2.14.1 Mid Sweden University
      2.14.2 Tekscan
      2.15 Key Points in this Chapter

     

    Chapter Three: Market Analysis

      3.1 Introduction
      3.2 Printed and Organic Sensors in Smart Packaging
      3.2.1 Sensors in Pharmaceutical Packaging
      3.2.2 Sensors in Food Packaging
      3.3.3 Firms and Research Organizations Developing Sensors for Smart Packaging Applications
      3.3 Smart Textiles and Uniforms
      3.3.1 Firms and Research Organizations Developing Printed and Organic Sensors for Smart Textile Applications
      3.4 Healthcare and Medical Diagnostic Applications
      3.4.1 Firms and Research Organizations Developing Printed and Organic Sensors for Healthcare Applications
      3.5 Genomics and Proteomics
      3.5.1 Firms and Research Organizations Developing Organic and Printable Sensors for Genomics and Proteomics Applications
      3.6 Homeland Security
      3.6.1 Firms and Research Organizations Developing Organic and Printable Sensors for Homeland Security Applications
      3.7 Environmental Monitoring
      3.7.1 Firms and Research Organizations Developing Organic and Printable Sensors for Environmental Monitoring Applications
      3.8 Robotics
      3.9 Future Applications
      3.9.1 Human Enhancement
      3.9.2 The Internet of Things
      3.10 Key Points in this Chapter

     

    Chapter Four: Firms and Research Groups Involved With Printed and Organic Sensors

      4.1 Commercial Firms Involved with Printed and Organic Sensors
      4.1.1 Acrongenomics Inc.
      4.1.2 Agilent Technologies
      4.1.3 BioDot
      4.1.4 Cypak
      4.1.5 EcoBioServices and Research
      4.1.6 Gas Sensor Solutions
      4.1.7 NanoIdent
      4.1.8 Ohmcraft
      4.1.9 Peratech
      4.1.10 Sensible Solutions
      4.1.11 Tekscan
      4.1.12 Other
      4.2 Research Groups Involved with Printed and Organic Sensors
      4.2.1 Infotonics
      4.2.2 Mid Sweden University
      4.2.3 National Centre for Sensor Research
      4.2.4 University of Arkansas
      4.2.5 University of Florence
      4.2.6 University of Tokyo
      4.2.7 VTT Research
      4.3 Key Points in this Chapter

     

    Chapter Five: Eight-Year Forecasts of Printed and Organic Sensors

      5.1 Forecasting Methodology
      5.1.1 Data Sources
      5.1.2 Scope of Forecast
      5.1.3 Comparison with Previous NanoMarkets Forecasts
      5.2 Eight-Year Forecasts of Organic and Printed Biosensors and Genetic Sensors
      5.3 Eight-Year Forecasts of Pressure, Motion and Physical Sensors
      5.4 Eight-Year Forecasts of Organic and Printed Sensors by Application and Type
      5.5 Eight-Year Forecasts of Organic and Printed Sensors by Material

    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in this Report

    About the Authors

     

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Summary of Market Forecasts for Organic and Printed Sensors
    Exhibit 2-1: Organic/Printable Electronics-Generated Opportunities in Sensing
    Exhibit 2-2: Activities of Selected Large Materials, Chemical and Electronics Firms in the TOP Electronics Market Through Strategic Investment and Partnerships
    Exhibit 2-3: Advantages Claimed for Nanoparticulate Silver Inks
    Exhibit 2-4: Characteristics of Organic Electronics Semiconductor Materials
    Exhibit 2-5: Opportunities for Flexible Sensors
    Exhibit 2-6: Organic Electronics: How Materials and Production Technologies are Matched
    Exhibit 2-7: Comparison of Processes Used for Printable Electronics
    Exhibit 2-8: Inkjet Suppliers for PE
    Exhibit 3-1: Roadmap for Adoption of Sensors in Smart Packaging
    Exhibit 3-2: Electronics in Smart Textiles
    Exhibit 4-1: Palm Instruments Partners
    Exhibit 4-2: Research Groups Involved in Printed and/or Organic Sensors
    Exhibit 5-1: Market Forecasts for Organic and Printed Biosensors and Genetic Sensors
    Exhibit 5-2: Market Forecasts for Pressure, Motion and Other Physical Sensors
    Exhibit 5-3: Market Forecasts by Type of Printed/Organic Sensor ($ Millions)
    Exhibit 5-4: Eight-Year Forecast of Materials for Printed and Organic Electronics Sensors

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