PURCHASE OPTIONS
Single User $595.00  
Advanced (up to 5 users) $995.00  
Grou (up to 10 users) $1,495.00  
Enterprise $1,995.00  
REPORT # Nano-239 PUBLISHED March 17, 2011
Smart Grid Sensing, Monitoring and Control Systems:  Market Opportunities 2011
CATEGORIES :
  • Smart Technology
  • SUMMARY

    Cisco's acquisition of the Smart Grid monitoring company Arch Rock highlights the key role played by sensing, monitoring systems in the Smart Grid.   To make them truly “smart” electricity grids require “ears and eyes” and this is exactly what Smart Grid sensing and monitoring systems provide.  Smart Grids also need “muscle” and this why sensing and monitoring systems also increasingly incorporate control functionality of various kinds

    Because of their core value to the whole Smart Grid concept, NanoMarkets/Smart Grid Analysis believes that Sensing, Monitoring and Control systems for the Smart represent a significant new revenue opportunity for firms to tap into. Furthermore we believe that these opportunities are available to a broad range of businesses, from specialist systems firms to value-added retailers to components and software firms.

    The research team at NanoMarkets/Smart Grid Analysis has been covering sensor related developments for many years and in 2009 we published a highly successful report on the market for sensors in the Smart Grid.  This year we are extending our coverage to include the related and rapidly expanding market for Smart Grid Sensing, Monitoring and Control systems.  (We will be covering the device-level opportunities for Smart Grid sensors in another soon-to-be released report.)

    This report provides insights and forecasts on the full range of sensing, monitoring and control systems that are – and will be – sold into the Smart Grid.  It covers the full range of systems, from those designed to add value to AMI networks, to those used in conjunction with transmission systems.  And it shows how new technologies are enabling such systems to add functionality to meet the very demanding needs of today’s Smart Grids.  

    We also consider the state of the art in such systems today, what new features and functions and features will be added in the future and who the leading suppliers and products will be in this rapidly emerging market.  As with all NanoMarkets/Smart Grid Analysis reports, this new report contains granular eight-year market forecasts.
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    Executive Summary
    E.1 Introduction
    E.2 Summary of Opportunities for Sensing and Monitoring Systems in the Smart Grid
    E.2.1 Energy Monitoring and Equipment Monitoring Applications for Sensors
    E.2.2 Sensors for Load Balancing for Alternative Energy Sources
    E.2.3 Sensors for Energy Storage Requirements in Smart Grids
    E.3 Smart Grid Sensing and Monitoring Opportunities for Firms Outside the  Electricity Industry
    E.3.1 Telecom Companies
    E.3.2 Software Companies
    E.3.3 Chip Companies
    E.4 Key Players in the Smart Grid Energy Sensor Space
    E.4.1 Firms to Watch from the T&D Space
    E.4.2 Firms to Watch in the HAN Sensing Space
    E.4.3 Firms to Watch in Smart Grid Sensor Networks
    E.4.4 Firms to Watch in the Sensor Hardware Space
    E.4.5 A Few Other Firms to Watch
    E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts for Smart Grid Sensing and Monitoring Systems
     
    Chapter One: Introduction
    1.1 Background to This Report
    1.1.1 Sensing Technology Trends in the Smart Grid
    1.1.2 Who Will Make Money from the Smart Grid Sensing Business?
    1.2 Objective and Scope of This Report
    1.3 Methodology of This Report
    1.4 Plan of This Report
     
    Chapter Two: Drivers and Technologies for Smart Grid Sensing, Monitoring and Control Systems
    2.1 Why Smart Grid Operators Will Buy Smart Grid Sensing,  Monitoring and Control Systems
    2.1.1 Need for Enhanced Grid Efficiency
    2.1.2 Avoidance of Disruption by Outages and Increased Reliability
    2.1.3 Impact of Renewable Energy Sources on T&D System Efficiency
    2.1.4 Sensors and FACTS
    2.1.5 Sensors and Energy Storage
    2.2 Current and Future Functional Requirements for Smart Grid Monitoring, Sensing and Control Systems
    2.2.1 Enhanced Maintenance Requirements
    2.2.2 Outage Management
    2.2.3 Load Forecasting and Systems Planning
    2.2.4 Improved Energy Trading Operations
    2.2.5 Improved Analysis of and Response to Consumer Needs and Behavior
    2.2.6 Simulation and Training
    2.3 Technical and Market Requirements for Sensors in the Smart Grid
    2.3.1 Consensus Views on Sensor Deployment Roadmaps for Smart Grids
    2.4 Smart Grids and Sensor Technology Advances
    2.4.1 Radio Backscatter Technology:  Splice Sensing and Insulation  Contamination Detection
    2.4.2  Piezoelectric Materials:  Inspection of Structural Members
    2.4.3  Conductive Polymers:  Electrochemical Analysis
    2.4.4  New Product Directions for Smart Grid Sensors
    2.4.5 Smart Grid Electrical Storage Specific Sensor Issues
    2.4.6 AMI and Sensing
    2.5 Software Trends and Monitoring/Control in the Smart Grid
    2.5.1 Evolution and Advances in Geographic Information Systems
    2.5.2 Software and Security Issues Associated with Smart Grid Sensors
    2.6 Smart Grid Sensor Opportunities in the Electrical Distribution Network (Substation- To-Customer Smart Meter)
    2.6.1 Role of Sensors: Current Opportunities and Future Evolution in the Distribution Network
    2.6.2 Smart Sensor Networks and Opportunities to Improve Efficiency and Reliability in the Distribution Grid
    2.6.3 Key Trends in Remote Equipment Inspection and Communication in the Distribution Network
    2.6.4 Sensors and the Integration of Distributed Generation, "Smart Grid Islands" and Grid Storage in the Distribution Network
    2.7 Smart Grid Sensor Opportunities in the Home Area Network (HAN)
    2.7.1 Role of Sensors, Current Opportunities and Future Evolution in HANs
    2.7.2 Smart-Sensor Networks and Opportunities to Improve Efficiency in HANs
    2.7.3 Time-of-Use (TOU) Pricing and Its Effect on Smart HAN Markets
    2.7.4 Integration of Micro-Generation, "Micro-Island" Grids, Plug-In Hybrids (PEHV) and Grid Storage in HANs
    2.8 Smart Grid Sensor Opportunities in Electrical Transmission (Generation Site to Substations)
    2.8.1 Role of Sensors: Current Opportunities and Future Evolution in the Transmission Network
    2.8.2 Smart-Sensor Networks and Opportunities to Improve Efficiency and Reliability
    2.8.3 Key Trends in Remote Equipment Inspection and Communication
    2.8.4 Integration of Distributed Generation, Renewable Assets, and Grid Storage in the Transmission Networks
    2.9 Smart Grid Standards and Monitoring Systems
    2.10 Key Points in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Three: Products and Markets for Smart Grid Sensing, Monitoring and Control Systems
    3.1 Next-Generation SCADA Systems
    3.1.1 Future Enhancements of SCADA Systems
    3.1.2 Leading Advanced SCADA System Products:  Some Examples
    3.1.3 Who are the Key Buyers for Advanced SCADA Systems?
    3.2 Remote Equipment Inspection and Control
    3.2.1 Transformer Monitoring Systems and Services
    3.2.2 Wide-Area Measurement Systems (WAMS)
    3.2.3 Leading Remote Inspection and Control Systems and Services
    3.3 Systems for Monitoring AMI Networks and HANs
    3.3.1 Leading Monitoring Systems for AMI Networks and Their Functionality
    3.3.2 What Kind of Grid Monitoring will be Required for HANS?
    3.4 Monitoring and Control in the Transmission Grid
    3.4.1 What Kinds of Monitoring and Control Does the Transmission Grid Need?
    3.4.2 Examples of Transmission Monitoring and Control Systems and  Their Functionality
    3.5 Specialist Systems for Monitoring and Control of Renewable Energy Systems
    3.5.1 Systems Used for Monitoring and Control of Wind Facilities
    3.5.2 Systems Used for Monitoring and Control of Solar Facilities
    3.5.3 Renewable Integration Monitoring Systems (RIMS)
    3.6 Monitoring and Control of Grid Energy Storage Systems
    3.7 Key Points in this Chapter
     
    Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts of Smart Grid Sensing, Monitoring and Control Systems
    4.1 Forecasting Methodology
    4.1.1 Data Sources
    4.2 Forecast of System Shipments by System Type and Functionality
    4.2.1 Transformer Monitoring Markets
    4.2.2 Advanced SCADA Systems
    4.2.3 Monitoring Systems for AMI and HANs
    4.2.4 Eight-Year Smart Grid Sensor Forecast for HAN Applications
    4.2.5 Renewable Integration Monitoring Systems
    4.2.6 Sensors for Distribution Networks
    4.2.7 Eight-Year Smart Grid Sensor Forecast for Transmission Network Applications
    4.3 Monitoring Service Revenue Forecasts
    4.4 Summary of Market Forecasts for Sensing and Monitoring Revenues
    4.4.1  Regional Shares of Market
    Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report
    About the Authors
     

    List of Exhibits

    Exhibit E-1: Smart Grid Monitoring: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts ($ Millions)

    Exhibit E-2:Smart Grid Sensing Devices and Subsystems: Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts  ($ Millions)

    Exhibit 2-1: Selected Sensor-Related Technical Developments and Trends in the  Smart Grid Industry. 

    Exhibit 3-1:Traditional Communications Used for SCADA. 

    Exhibit 3-2:Selected Advanced SCADA Projects in the U.S. With Buyers

    Exhibit 4-1: Smart Grid Transformer Monitoring Markets

    Exhibit 4-2: Advanced SCADA System Markets

    Exhibit 4-3: AMI Monitoring Markets

    Exhibit 4-4:Penetration of Smart Sensors in Home Area Networks (Percent)

    Exhibit 4-5:Global Smart Grid Sensor Volume for HAN by Sensor Type (Millions of Sensors)

    Exhibit 4-6: Revenue for Smart Grid Sensors in Home Area Network ($ Millions)

    Exhibit 4-7:Volume for Smart-Enabled Sensors in Home Area Network Applications by Region. 

    Exhibit 4-8: Revenue for Smart-Enabled Sensors in Home Area Network Applications by Region. 

    Exhibit 4-9:Renewable Energy Management Systems

    Exhibit 4-10: Volume of Smart-Enabled Sensors on Distribution Networks (Millions of Sensors)

    Exhibit 4-11: Revenue for Smart-Enabled Sensors on Distribution Networks ($ Millions)

    Exhibit 4-12: Volume for Smart-Enabled Sensors in Distribution Network Applications by Region.

    Exhibit 4-13: Revenue for Smart-Enabled Sensors in Distribution Network Applications by Region. 

    Exhibit 4-14: Volume of Smart-Enabled Sensors on Transmission Networks

    Exhibit 4-15: Revenue for Smart-Enabled Sensors on Transmission Networks ($ Millions)

    Exhibit 4-16: Volume for Smart Sensors in Transmission Network Applications by Region (Millions)

    Exhibit 4-17: Revenue for Smart Sensors in Transmission Network Applications by Region. 

    Exhibit 4-18: Smart Grid Monitoring Service Revenues

    Exhibit 4-19: Worldwide Smart Grid Sensors and Monitoring Revenues ($ Millions)

    Exhibit 4-20: Smart Grid Sensor Revenues by Region. 

Login

You have to be logged in to view the content you are requesting. If you are not a registered user please take a moment to sign up.

Remember me?

Forgot Password?

×